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ASS10N1ST 

BULLETIN of HOLY CROSS PROVINCE 




No. 1 



January 1949 



Vol. II, No. 1 



THE PASSIONIST 

Bulletin of Holy Cross Province 



January, 1949 



Published bimonthly at the Sacred Heart Retreat, 1924 Newburg Road, Louisville 5, Ky M U.S.A. 
Issued each January, March, May, July, September and November. Financed by free-will 
offerings from readers. There is no Copyright. The paper is a private publication "pro 
manuscripto." 



IN THIS ISSUE 



Mission and Spirit 1 

Thanksgiving 14 

Fr. Bonaventure 18 

Missionary Forum 23 

Ius Particulare 32 

Passionist and Prayer 36 

Passionist Customs 42 

Followers of the Crucified 45 

Acta Congregationis 47 

Sts. John and Paul 49 



Province of St. Paul 52 

Province of St. Michael 55 

Province of Holy Cross 61 

Lady of Holy Hope Province 76 

German Vice-Province 78 

Passionist Nuns 80 

Passionist Sisters 84 

Varia 86 

Works of the Ministry 90 

Who is Who 95 



"The Passionist" aims at a deeper knowledge of the purpose of our Congregation and at a 
closer attainment of said purpose. Cooperation is invited. Consequently, contributions by any 
member of the Congregation along the lines of news, past or present, of general or provincial 
interest; articles dogmatic, ascetical, canonical or of historical value for us, are welcome. Also 
photographs of recent or historic C.P. events are helpful towards the ideal "The Passionist' 
strives to reach. Especially at present does "The Passionist" wish to establish and conduct the 
Missionary Forum. 



cjHission ana <Spfoit 

of the 
L asslonlst Congregation 



'his letter has been referred to by 
lost Reverend Father General as the 
ery best ever written in the English 
mguage on the subject. 




One of the most important duties 
of every superior, especially the 
higher superiors, is to carry out 
the distinctive mission and preserve 
the peculiar spirit of his Order. 
Nothing is more vital to a Religious 
Order than its distinctive mission 
and its peculiar spirit. Religious 
Orders flourish or decay, stand or 
fall in proportion as they accom- 
plish or neglect their distinctive 
work — in proportion as they pre- 
serve or lose their peculiar spirit. 

Whilst every Religious Order is 



in danger of departing from its 
original purpose, of neglecting its 
distinctive mission and of losing 
its peculiar spirit, our Congrega- 
tion is for some reasons, in greater 
danger than others. As we all 
know, the mission and spirit of the 
Passionist Congregation require a 
careful blending of the active and 
contemplative lives. This is no easy 
task. There will always be danger 
of exaggerating the importance of 
one or other of these essential 
elements. Some, who arc naturally 



inclined to activity or who have 
an inordinate craving for noise and 
distraction, may give themselves 
overmuch to active work, to the 
neglect of solitude and prayer; 
whilst others, who are naturally 
inclined to the quiet of home-life, 
may neglect work, and justify their 
sloth and lack of zeal on the plea 
of the contemplative life. 

Hence, the necessity of having 
this matter brought home to us 
from time to time, and of thus 
nourishing our zeal both for work 
and for prayer. To this purpose 
my present remarks shall be direct- 
ed. I wish to explain the distinctive 
mission and peculiar spirit of our 
Congregation ; to show the sublime 
excellence of the Passionist voca- 
tion ; and to offer some practical 
suggestions for the accomplishment 
of our mission and the preservation 
of our spirit. 




I. 

The primary end or mission of 
every Religious Order is the per-' 
fection or sanctification of its own] 
members, for the religious state is 
nothing else than the natural out-l 
growth and development of those' 
counsels of perfection offered byl 
Jesus Christ to those who would 
attain not only salvation but sanc- 
tity or perfect union with God. 

From the earliest ages of thel 
Church, however, the Religious] 
Orders have also served another! 
purpose. Obeying the great Chris- 
tian precept of fraternal charity, 
they have, at all times, taken a 
most active part in the divine work] 
of saving the human race. Indeed,! 
the Church, in approving Religious- 
Orders, expects of them this workl 
for souls. She regards the Reli-I 
gious Orders as the grand auxili-l 
aries of the hierarchy and clergy inl 
the arduous enterprise of convert- 1 
ing and saving the world. They I 
are, in her eyes, picked battalions,] 
thoroughly disciplined and fully I 
armed to sustain the most violent] 
attacks of her enemies and to fight] 
her fiercest battles. 

Moreover, in this labor for souls 
the Religious Orders have each 
their own distinct mission or field 
of work, for the Church is a well 
organized body in which as in thej 
physical body of man every mem- 
ber has its own place to fill, its 
own part to play, its own function 
to perform. "As in one body we 



have many members, but all the 
members have not the same office, 
so we being many are one body in 
Christ," says St. Paul; and he con- 
tinues : "Now there are diversities 
of graces, but the same Spirit, and 
there are diversities of ministries 
but the same Lord, and there are 
diversities of operations, but the 
same God, who worketh all in all." 
"Now God," he goes on to say, 
"hath set the members, every one of 
them in the body, as it hath pleased 
Him. He hath set some in the 
Church, first Apostles; secondly 
prophets; thirdly doctors; after 
that miracles, graces of healings, 
helps, governments, kinds of 
tongues, interpretation of speech- 
es." I Cor. XII. 

All this is applicable to Religious 
Orders as well as to individual 
souls. Each Order has its particu- 
lar work, its special function in 
the Church, and its peculiar mission 
to the world. Each Order has also 
its corresponding gifts and qualifi- 
cations which go to make up what 
is known as the Spirit of the Or- 
der. There are Contemplative Or- 
ders destined to serve the Church 
and save the world by a hidden, 
austere life of prayer and penance ; 
and there are Active Orders called 
to go out among men and labor 
actively for their conversion and 
salvation. Some of these Orders 
engage in the corporal works of 
mercy and others in the spiritual 
works of mercy ; some are devoted 



exclusively to teaching, some to 
pastoral charges, and others to the 
Apostolate of preaching. 

To know what place the Pas- 
sionist Congregation fills in the 
Church, what is its distinctive mis- 
sion and its peculiar Spirit we have 
but to study our Rules and Con- 
stitutions, our Customs and Tra- 
ditions, and the life of our Holy 
Founder, St. Paul of the Cross. 
From these sources it is evident, 
beyond all doubt, that our Congre- 
gation is both contemplative and 
active ; that whilst its peculiar Spir- 
it is one of prayer, penance and 
solitude, it also engages in active 
works of the ministry — its distinc- 
tive ministry being the preaching 
of Christ Crucified. We are an 
Order of Apostles destined to carry 
the gospel message both to Chris- 
tian and to unbeliever; to preach 
by our life as well as by our words 
the hard lessons of the Cross — the 
poverty, humility, and mortification 
of Jesus. 

1. First as to the Active Element 
of the Passionist Congregation. We 
read in the first and fundamental 
chapter of our Rules : "This Con- 
gregation has the same object in 
view, which every Christian and 
more particularly every ecclesiastic 
ought to have, namely, that of ful- 
filling exactly the precepts of the 
divine law and evangelical counsels. 
Therefore the Religious ought in 
the first place to provide for their 
own salvation, in the manner pre- 



3 



scribed by these constitutions. They 
should devote themselves to offices 
of charity towards their neighbor." 
And it continues: "Since one of 
the chief objects of our Congrega- 
tion is not only to pray for our- 
selves that we may be united to 
God by charity, but also to lead 
others to the same point, instruct- 
ing them in the best and easiest 
manner possible: those members 
who may be considered fit for so 
great work, must endeavor, as well 
during Apostolic Missions, as other 
pious exercises, to teach the people 
by word of mouth, to meditate de- 
voutly on the mysteries, sufferings, 
and death of our Lord Jesus 
Christ." We go so far even as to 
take a fourth vow, which, for the 
missionaries at least, means a vow 
to preach Christ Crucified to the 
world. Our Rules and Regulations 
lay down minute directions for the 
conduct of Missions and Retreats. 

Our Holy Founder does not re- 
strict our ministry to the preach- 
ing of missions and retreats. In 
the thirty-fourth chapter of the 
Rules, he expressly ordains that we 
go out on other occasions, also, in 
order to instruct people in Chris- 
tian doctrine and impress on their 
minds the Passion of our Lord. 

"When a Retreat has in it Breth- 
ren who are judged fit for under- 
taking Apostolic Missions, or other 
pious offices to procure the salva- 
tion of their neighbor, the Superior 
may select one of the Priests or 



Clerks, to go on Feast Days into! 
the places near them, and instruct | 
the neighboring people in the doc- 1 
trines of Christian Faith, and their 
duties of piety, and promote among 
fhem an assiduous remembrance of I 
the life-giving Passion and Death 
of our Lord Jesus Christ." 

Again in chapter XXXIII, "On J 
the manner of performing a jour- 1 
ney," our Holy Founder reveals the I 
zeal for souls which burnt in his 
own heart and which he desires to 
see in his children. Whilst warn- 
ing against worldly diversions, he 
exhorts us to spend our free time 
in works for the neighbor. He 
says : "If there is time to spare 
they shall occupy themselves in ex- 
ercises of Christian mercy and 
charity, according to the prescrip- 
tion of the Institute. Let it not 
be permitted them to be distracted 
with unnecessary visits and secular 
affairs, but gladly fleeing from, the 
ways of the world they shall rather 
visit the sick poor in the hospitals 
and those cast into prisons." It is 
evident, then, that St. Paul of the 
Cross wishes his children to use 
every opportunity to minister to 
souls and not to restrict their la- 
bors to the giving of missions and 
retreats. 

As for foreign missions, our 
Holy Rules are most emphatic: "If 
Almighty God should please to call 
to our Congregation Brethren en- 
dowed with such learning that 
they may be considered qualified to 



refute heretics and to bring unbe- 
lievers to the Christian Faith, as 
soon as ever they shall be sum- 
moned to work for their salvation, 
either by the Sovereign Pontiff, or 
the Sacred Congregation for the 
Propagation of the Faith, they 
shall repair to whatever place de- 
mands them." 

The life of St. Paul of the Cross 
shows him preeminently an Apos- 
tle and Missioner. "No sooner was 
he clothed with the Passionist hab- 
it," says his biographer Blessed 
Strambi, "than he went about cate- 
chising the children and the poor. 
Going forth from his little hermit- 
age at San Stefano he would pass 
through the streets of Castellazzo, 
ringing a little bell and crying out: 
To the catechism in the Church. 
Fathers and Mothers send your 
children to Christian doctrine'." 
Then the bishop commissioned him, 
though still a layman, to go into 
the pulpit and preach the Gospel. 
Once ordained a priest, he with 
his first companions went up and 
down Italy with crucifix in hand, 
giving Missions, and Retreats, 
preaching everywhere — in the mar- 
ket-places, at the street corners, in 
village chapel and stately city 
churches. We are told in his life 
that he valued even one missioner 
more than a Retreat. "His ardent 
zeal for souls was manifested," says 
Bl. Strambi, "not merely by giving 
missions and retreats, but by using 
every occasion that offered for 



helping souls — hearing confessions 
for long hours, directing penitents 
by letter, visiting the sick, and 
seeking poor sinners to bring them 
back to God." Speaking of these 
first Passionists, his biographer 
says: "Every Sunday and festival 
they went to the neighboring 
church and catechised." 

For over forty years Paul con- 
tinued thus to labor for souls. And 
Bl. Strambi says : "When old and 
infirm and no longer able to go out 
on missions he exclaimed with tears 
in his eyes: 'Ah, if I could only 
work, but I am no longer able, I 
am no longer a laborer. If I were 
able I would wish to be still in the 
field for the wants of the Church 
are very great indeed'." 

After all this, can we doubt what 
place the Passionist Congregation 
is destined to fill in the Church, 
what is her peculiar vocation. I 
repeat. we are preeminently, 
preachers of the Gospel, missioners, 
apostles of Christ and Him Cruci- 
fied. We can say with St. Paul the 
Apostle: "Christ sent me not to 
baptize but to preach the Gospel. 
We preach Christ and Him Cru- 
cified." I Cor. I. 

So much for the active element 
of the Passionist Congregation. 
2. As to the Contemplative Ele- 
ment of our Congregation our Rules 
and Regulations are equally clear 
and emphatic. They establish as a 
fundamental principle that our spir- 
it is one of prayer, poverty, pen- 



ance, and solitude. Thus we read 
in the Regulations : "Let the re- 
ligious remember what our Holy 
Founder used to say, that the first 
idea with which God inspired him 
in founding the Congregation was 
this : to bring together men who 
should be detached from all crea- 
tures in order to be united with 
God; and how often, especially 
when dying, did he tell us : that 
our spirit was a spirit of prayer, 
of solitude and of poverty without 
which the Congregation would nei- 
ther prosper nor endure." 

All the minute prescriptions a- 
bout the solitary location of our 
Retreats; about the poverty of our 
dwellings and furniture, of our 
food and clothing are directed to 
the cultivation of this spirit. The 
prohibition against worldly amuse- 
ments and against unnecessary in- 
tercourse with seculars; the fasts 
and abstinence; the discipline, the 
straw bed; the sandals and rough 
habit; the midnight observance; 
the solemn choral chant and long 
hours of mental prayer are but 
means for cultivating the contem- 
plative spirit — for detaching us 
from creatures and uniting us with 
God. 6 v, 

3. The important point to note is 
that according to our Holy Found- 
er's teaching and example the con- 
templative life was not to be mere- 
ly an aid to our sanctification, but 
was to be the means through which 
we are to be enabled to accomplish 



our distinctive work of preaching 
[Christ Crucified to the world. By 

olitude and meditation, by prayer 
t nd penance, our Holy Founder in- 
tended that the minds of his chil- 
dren should be deeply imbued with 

he eternal truths of salvation and 
their hearts inflamed with ardent 
zeal, so that they might, later, go 
forth as men of God — as true Apos- 
tles to instruct the ignorant, to 
arouse the lukewarm, to convert 
sinners and to enkindle in all hearts 
that intense love for Christ Cruci- 
fied which burnt in their own. 

How clearly he draws out this 
interdependence of the two ele- 
ments of our life. Thus speaking 
of our monasteries he says: "The 
houses shall be constructed in re- 
tired places, that the devout breth- 
ren after their apostolic labors un- 
dergone for the glory of God, and 
the salvation of souls, may with- 
draw far from the society of men 
and the noise of the world to de- 
vote themselves in solitude to their 
own spiritual advancement, to 
prayers, fastings, and other pious 
exercises, by which they may be 
more and more inflamed with divine 
love, and being grown stronger in 
Christian virtues, may become bet- 
ter qualified and more ready for 
gathering abundant fruits of the', 
word of God, which they have to 
scatter, exciting in every place, to 
the utmost of their power, a lovej 
of piety and a grateful remem- 
brance of and veneration for the 



Passion and Death of Christ our 
Lord." Hence he calls our houses 
Retreats, i.e., solitary places to 
which we are periodically to retreat 
for rest and recuperation after 
seasons of labor and struggle in the 
warfare for Christ, — Retreats in 
which, removed far from the noise 
and distraction of the world, we 
may refresh our souls, and revive 
our spiritual strength for new la- 
bors and new battles. 

This twofold element of Passion- 
ist life was clearly revealed to St. 
Paul of the Cross from the very 
beginning of his career. His own 
statement is: "I, Paul Francis, a 
great sinner, about two years after 
God had converted me to a life of 
penance, was passing along the 
coast of Genoa, towards the West, 
when my heart was moved with a 
desire for solitude. After some 
time, though I do not clearly re- 
member the month nor the day, 
these constant inspirations to re- 
tire into solitude became more and 
more pressing. It was about this 
time that I was moved to wear a 
black tunic of coarsest wool, to go 
barefooted, to live in the greatest 
poverty, in fine, to lead a life of 
penance. The wish I then conceived 
never left me. I felt myself more 
and more powerfully impelled to go 
into solitude. It was then that 
another inspiration came into my 
mind, and this was to assemble 
companions that we might unite 
together in endeavoring to promote 



in the souls of others the holy fear 
of God, this being what I wished 
for most. 

"Let it be known, that this in- 
tention which God gives me in re- 
gard to this Congregation does not 
consist in anything but this ; that 
is, in the first place, that we should 
perfectly observe the law of our 
good God, adding to this the per- 
fect observance of holy evangelical 
counsels, and particularly the total 
detachment from all created things, 
and a strict practice of holy pover- 
ty, which is so necessary for the 
observance of the other counsels, 
and that we should maintain our 
fervor in holy prayer, be zealous 
for the honour of God, promote in 
the souls of others the holy fear 
of God, seeking to destroy sin; and 
in fine, that we should labour in- 
defatigably in holy works of chari- 
ty, so that our dear Lord may be 
loved, feared, served, and praised 
by all for ever and ever, Amen. 
Sit nomen Jesu Benedictum!" 

Thus we see from our Rules and 
Regulations and from the life of 
our Holy Founder that there en- 
ters into our Congregation a two- 
fold element — a contemplative ele- 
ment and an active element. St. 
Paul of the Cross would have us 
be, like himself, both Apostles and 
Contemplatives — laboring, as he 
says, "with all our strength in the 
Lord's vineyard" yet at the same 
time, leading a life of prayer and 
intimate union with God. 



II. 

Need I now say much to prove 
the sublime excellence of this Pas- 
sionist standard of religious life — 
this close union and alliance be- 
tween the active and contemplative 
elements. Can we doubt the per- 
fection and superiority of such a 
life? Was not this the life of the 
God-Man upon earth, Who after 
spending thirty years in solitude 
and communion with His Father, 
went forth into the noisy wicked 
world, to save men; and Who even 
during His public life and active 
ministry, was wont to retire at 
night into solitude to spend hours 
in prayer. 

Indeed, if love of God and love 
of the neighbor are the two great 
precepts of the New Law, then 
both the contemplative and the ac- 
tive elements must enter into every 
Christian life, for in what does the 
love of God consist, but in a state 
of intimate union and communion 
with Him? And in what does love 
for neighbor chiefly consist but in 
zeal for his salvation? No man 
can remain a fervent Christian who 
habitually neglects prayer and 
union with God, and no man can 
be called a true Christian who is 
indifferent to the salvation of his 
neighbor. 

It is, however, particularly for 
priests — the ministers of Christ — 
that this union of the active and 
contemplative lives is indispensable. 
On the one hand, the priest has a 



special obligation to labor for souls. 
He is a priest not for himself but 
for others. "Sacerdos pro populo.' 
On the other hand, he will not and 
cannot labor successfully unless he 
leads a life of prayer and union 
with God. "Concaluit cor meum in- 
tra me et in meditatione mea ex- 
ardescet ignis/' (Ps. 34.) says the 
Psalmist. In meditation and con- 
templation and prayer is the heart 
inflamed with love for God and 
zeal for souls. Only by a life of 
habitual communion with God can 
the priest acquire that vivid realiz- 
ation of eternal truths so indispens- 
able for effective preaching of the 
gospel ; only through continual 
prayer will he receive those super- 
natural graces by which alone he 
can convince human minds, touch 
human hearts, move human wills 
and convert souls to God. Finally, 
only by prayer and union with God 
can he preserve his own soul pure 
from the contamination of the cor- 
rupt world midst which he must 
labor. 

How admirable then the Congre- 
gation founded by Paul of the 
Cross! How wise this union and 
alliance between the active life of 
the apostolate and the contempla- 
tive life of solitude and prayer! 

III. 
But if this Passionist standard 
of life is so beautiful and sublime, 
it is, also, as I said, very difficult 
to maintain. This delicate blend- 
ing of the active and contemplative 



elements is no easy task. There is, 
therefore, a special danger in our 
Congregation of neglecting our dis- 
tinctive mission and of losing our 
peculiar spirit. Allow me, now, be- 
fore concluding, to offer some prac- 
tical suggestions for the perfect 
accomplishment of our mission and 
for the faithful preservation of our 
peculiar spirit. 

1. First in regard to the Active 
Element in our Life. As our Con- 
gregation is active as well as con- 
templative, it follows that labor for 
souls is a strict duty binding every 
member of the Congregation. 

(a) It obliges the priests to go 
wherever and whenever sent by 
Superiors to give Missions and Re- 
treats, and in other ways to preach 
the word of God. Speaking of Mis- 
sions and Retreats, the Rule says: 
"Those who are called and sent by 
the above-named Superiors on serv- 
ices of this kind will be bound to 
undertake and perform them with 
a ready and willing mind, whether 
they be cities or towns to which 
they have to go, or rural districts, 
villages, islands, and poor, incom- 
modious, troublesome places, and 
subject to the inclemencies of the 
air. Let them consider theirs as 
the Divine Will and rejoice, for 
Christ's sake, with better reason, 
when it is their lot to labor for 
the salvation of souls in places more 
neglected, and of no consideration." 
This duty of laboring for souls 
obliges all the priests of the Con- 



gregation. There is no provision in 
the Rule for the type of priests 
who are to do nothing but keep the 
choir observance. Our Congrega- 
tion is not divided into two classes, 
Contemplatives and Apostles. All 
are to be Contemplatives, and all 
are to be Apostles. All take the 
vow to make Christ Crucified known 
and loved by men. Speaking of the 
novice taking his vows, the Holy 
Rule says: "He shall also promise 
that to the utmost of his power, 
he will promote among the faithful 
a grateful remembrance of and de- 
votion towards the Passion and 
Death of Our Lord Jesus Christ." 
According to the Rule, the priests 
are to fulfill this vow by giving of 
missions and retreats and by other- 
works of the ministry. For the 
fulfillment of this vow by those not 
destined for missions, the Rule 
says : "Let priests who are not des- 
tined for preaching, study to pro- 
mote this good in other ways, which 
will give the readiest occasions, 
particularly when hearing the con- 
fessions of sinners, when they give 
catechisms, or hold conferences on 
spiritual things; and on other oc- 
casions which they meet with in 
the performance of their duties, or 
from circumstances." 

As to the students, the duty of 
laboring for souls means, for the 
time being, hard and diligent study, 
so that they may acquire that sound 
learning and higher education need- 
ed to speak effectively to the en- 



9 



lightened age and country in which 
we live. "In every Province, one 
or more houses shall be set apart 
for study, where young men shall 
apply to Philosophy and Theology, 
that they may become fitter for 
the care of souls, and may labor 
with all their strength in our Lord's 
Vineyard." 

As to the Brothers, it obliges 
them to a life of prayer and manual 
work — prayer for the success of 
the missions, and manual work to 
give the missioners a comfortable 
home after their labors abroad. In 
a word, all are to labor, either 
directly or indirectly for souls. All 
must share in the twofold element 
of Passionist life — work and 
prayer. 

(b) Furthermore, as our distinctive 
ministry is the Apostolate of 
Preaching it follows, that we must 
devote to this our greatest care 
and best efforts. Hence the strict 
duty for our priests to fit them- 
selves for their ministry by pre- 
paring diligently all the instruc- 
tions, conferences, and other ser- 
mons required for all kinds of mis- 
sion and retreat work. According 
to our Rules and Regulations the 
time not devoted to the regular 
observance is to be spent in this 
manner. We read in the Regula- 
tions: 

"All the choir religious by reason 
of their state and according to our 
Holy Rule are obliged to employ in 
study the time marked out for it 



in the table of hours. The observ- 
ance of this point is most earnestly 
recommended as being an indis- 
pensable means of attaining the 
end of our vocation, which is to 
attend not merely to our own sanc- 
tification, but to that of our neigh- 
bor; and it is enjoined in a special 
manner upon the younger Religious 
in order that they may correspond 
with the care expended upon them 
by the Congregation in their in- 
struction, and so render them- 
selves fit to discharge well the du- 
ties proper to our Institute." 

The Passionist Congregation has 
been specially raised up by God to 
aid the clergy and hierarchy in the 
office of preaching. We are special- 
ists in this branch of the ministry 
— called to preach not merely to 
the laity but to religious souls and 
even to the clergy — "to feed the 
sheep" as well as "the lambs." What 
a shame if any one of our Fathers 
should, through indifference, be un- 
fit for this ministry. How pointed 
the warning of our Holy Founder, 
in the Rules: "Above all things," 
he says, "we admonish the Reli- 
gious to weigh well the sanctity, 
the responsibility and the object 
of their ministry; and never to 
omit anything so as to seem want- 
ing in their duty and to bring on 
themselves the blame for its prov- 
ing less perfect and useful to the 
people." 

Let me not be misunderstood. I 
fully realize that some have no 



10 



gift for preaching, and others — 
much to their regret — are held in 
offices, or engaged in home-work, 
which deprives them of the time 
and opportunity of giving missions, 
or of even preaching God's word. 
Let them not be discouraged, nor 
dissatisfied. There are various 
works and various offices in Christ's 
Church, each serving in its measure 
towards the Salvation of Souls. 
Perfect success depends upon each 
member being faithful to the work 
or office assigned to him — superiors 
of Communities, professors of stu- 
dents, chaplains and pastors as well 
as missioners. If all cannot go 
on missions, all can and must be 
faithful to their respective office — 
all can, besides, find numerous other 
ways and means of helping souls. 

Let me add a word particularly 
to that large number of Fathers 
among us who are engaged in 
parish work or chaplaincies. This 
ministry, whilst not the distinctive 
work of the Congregation, is per- 
mitted by our Holy Rules when 
superiors find it necessary, and the 
Rule that permits the work ipso 
facto empowers Superiors to as- 
sign some Fathers to the work. 
These Fathers, in obeying authori- 
ty, are doing God's Will as much 
as the missioners, and deserve all 
praise for their obedience. Let 
them, however, ever remember their 
distinctive vocation of Apostles of 
Christ Crucified, and use every op- 
portunity afforded them in their 



charge, of preaching the Gospel. 
Passionist parishes should be re- 
nowned especially for the care be- 
stowed upon the ministry of 
preaching. 

2. Now a few practical suggestions 
in regard to the Contemplative 
Element of our Life. If the Spirit 
of our Congregation is one of 
prayer, poverty, penance and soli- 
tude, and if this spirit is the in- 
dispensable qualification or means 
for the accomplishment of our dis- 
tinctive Passionist vocation, then 
it should be the highest ambition 
and constant care of every one of 
us to preserve this spirit in the 
Province at large, and in our own 
hearts, in particular. Hence the 
necessity of constant vigilance a- 
gainst the inroads of modern in- 
dulgence and worldly distraction. 
Above all, is it of supreme impor- 
tance to cling tenaciously to our 
choir observance and to be faithful 
to mental prayer. 

It is so easy to neglect all this — 
so easy for relaxation to creep in. 
The arguments for mitigating the 
austerity of the Rule, for allowing 
worldly diversions and for shorten- 
ing the time of prayer are so plausi- 
ble that unless we are well grounded 
in supernatural principles and ani- 
mated by supernatural faith, we 
shall most certainly relax first our 
conduct and then our standards 
and principles. Thus, one after the 
other of Passionist ideals and prac- 
tices will disappear, until, in the 



11 



end, our peculiar spirit will be lost 
and nothing will remain but the 
name and garb. 

Whilst indeed there is danger 
of exaggerating the importance of 
the contemplative element of our 
life — or, rather, danger of excus- 
ing spiritual sloth and lack of zeal 
by the plea of the contemplative 
life, the danger of exaggerating 
the active element is far greater. 
Human nature shrinks from the 
monotony of our home-life with its 
austerity and solitude, and wel- 
comes the noise and distraction and 
diversion afforded by the active life. 

Fr. Stanislaus. C. P. 




If we are to believe the warnings 
of Christ's Vicar there are pecu- 
liar dangers in this direction for 
the clergy of our day and country. 
Leo XIII in his condemnation of 
Americanism sounded the warning 
and the saintly Pontiff Pius X in 
his admirable "Letter to the Cler- 
gy" repeats a similar warning. He 
says: "There are those who think, 
nay even proclaim aloud, that the 
merit of a priest should consist in 
the fact that he is entirely occupied 
in working for others, so that pay- 
ing but little heed to the virtues 
by which a man is perfected him- 
self (and which they thus call pas- 
sive virtues) they proclaim that 
all a man's strength and zeal should 
be put forth in fostering and ex- 
ercising the active virtues. This 
teaching is utterly fallacious and 
pernicious." 

In conclusion, let us all resolve 
to treasure and nourish in our own 
souls both the active element and 
the contemplative element of our 
Congregation. Thank God, our 
Province has until now aimed con- 
sistently and struggled earnestly 
after the true Passionist standard 
of religious life. Indeed if this 
Province of St. Paul of the Cross 
is today so blessed by God, it is 
because we have been faithful in 
the two essential elements of our 
life — we have striven hard to keep 
the monastic observance at home, 
and we have devoted ourselves 
zealously to our distinctive mission 



of preaching the gospel. We have 
earned for ourselves with the laity, 
with the clergy and with the hier- 
archy, the reputation of being the 
most successful missionary body in 
the country. And now, in these 
latter days, much to the joy of 
the Holy See, and the admiration 
of the American Church, our 
American Province is sending 
bands of missionaries to pagan 
China to preach the Gospel to the 
poor benighted heathen. 

Ah, let us strive to uphold this 
standard at home, and let us es- 
tablish it also in the Field Afar, 
which has been entrusted to us by 
Christ's Vicar. Let us be big and 
fearless in planning and energetic 
in the execution of our plans for 
the development of our mission- 
field in China. If big expenditures 



are necessary then big begging 
must boldly be had recourse to. It 
is all part of the glorious enter- 
prise. If more apostles are de- 
manded, then more volunteers must 
be called for; aye, if martyrs are 
needed surely the Passionst Order, 
— the children of St. Paul of the 
Cross — will not shrink from the 
sacrifice and the glory. 

Only, in the midst of all this 
work, let us not lose sight of the 
interior life; let the missioners at 
home and the missioners in the 
Field Afar aim, above all, at the 
cultivation of our distinctive spirit 
— the spirit of prayer and solitude, 
of poverty and penance. 
Time of Canonical Visitation 1925 
Stanislaus of the 

Most Holy Redeemer. 
Provincial. 



THE HEART OF MARY 

Written to place under a picture of 
the Heart of Mary. 

Holy the womb that bore Him, 
Holy the breasts that fed, 

But holier still the royal heart 
That in His passion bled. 

— Cardinal Newman 



13 



Gratias agamus Domino! 



TLhanhsQiving witb St. ZTbomas 
anb St. paul of tbe dross 



Fr. Joseph Mary of the Incarnate Word. 



IN his beautiful letter to the Col- 
ossians, St. Paul gives thanks 
to the God and Father of our Lord 
Jesus Christ for their faith and 
love and hope. He is praying for 
their spiritual wisdom and under- 
standing, that they may walk wor- 
thily, "bearing fruit in every good 
work, and growing in the knowl- 
edge of God." 1 Then he reminds 
them of the source of all these 
blessings and hopes: the Father 
has made them "worthy to share 
the lot of the saints in light . . . 
transferred . . . into the kingdom of 
his beloved Son, in whom ... re- 
demption, the remission of . . . 
sins." 2 "For it has pleased God 
the Father that in him (Christ) 
all his fullness should dwell, and 
that through him he should recon- 
cile to himself all things, whether 
on the earth or in the heavens, 
making peace through the blood of 
his cross." 5 Finally, he urges them: 
"Show yourselves thankful. Be as- 
siduous in prayer, being wakeful 
therein with thanksgiving." 4 

A grateful remembrance of 
Christ's Passion, which makes pos- 
sible and actual our membership in 
the Mystical Body/ 1 is a fundamen- 



tal Christian attitude — "joyfully 
tendering thanks to the Father, 
(who has made us worthy to share 

he lot of the saints in light . . . 

ransferred us into the kingdom 
K>f his beloved Son, in whom we 
lave our redemption, the remission 

f sins." 6 How truly meet and 

proper, then, it is for Passionists 
jfco cherish this grateful remem- 
brance of the Cross and Passion 
!of our Lord Jesus Christ. Let us 
recall together some things from 
;>ur Holy Rule and our Spirit that 
.are calculated to perfect in us the 
spirit of gratitude. 

As a framework for our thoughts, 
We can take the "unshaken doc- 
trine of the Angelic Doctor." 7 St. 
Thomas distinguishes 8 three de- 
grees in the virtue of gratitude: 
first, to recognize the favor re- 
ceived; the second, to express one's 
appreciation and thanks ; and the 
third, to repay the favor at a suit- 
able place and time according to 
one's means. 

Certainly every Passionist by his 
profession recognizes the benefit of 
redemption. The fundamental chap- 
ter of our Holy Rule impresses 
upon us that the Sacred Passion of 



14 



our Lord Jesus Christ is the "foun- 
tain from which proceedeth all our 
good" ; and meditation thereon is 
indicated as "a most efficacious 
means of withdrawing the minds 
of men from iniquity and for lead- 
ing them on to the Christian per- 
fection at which we aim." 1 ' 

"Meditation," says St. Thomas, 
"strengthens memory." 10 St. Paul 
of the Cross as "our tutor in 
Christ," 11 has provided well for our 
memory training. Hours of medita- 
tion are to be spent in considering 
"the Divine attributes and perfec- 
tions, and also . . . the Mysteries of 
the Life, Passion, and Death of our 
Lord Jesus Christ, from which 
chiefly all religious perfection and 
sanctity take their rule and in- 
crease." 12 On the day of profes- 
sion, a cross is placed on the 
shoulder of the novice and a crown 
of thorns on his head, "according 
to the distinguishing custom of the 
Institute." Then is attached to his 
breast the "sign of salvation." 13 
The Passionist can now say: "With 
Christ I am nailed to the cross. It 
is now no longer I that live, but 
Christ lives in me. ... I live in the 
faith of the Son of God, who loved 
me and gave himself up for me." 14 
Passionist life is lived in the recog- 
nition of Christ's Passion, is lived 
in grateful remembrance. 1 "' 

To express one's appreciation 
and thanks is the second duty of 
gratitude. From the novitiate, we 
have been encouraged to use such 



invocations as that of our Holy 
Founder: "Lord, I give Thee thanks 
for that Thou didst die upon the 
Cross for my sins." 10 Before longer 
recreations, we adore and bless 
Christ for the redemption wrought 
by His holy Cross. On Friday, we 
"bear some voluntary mortification 
of the body or give some example 
of virtue, especially in the refec- 
tory." 17 Indeed, our holy habit, our 
sign, our Holy Rule, all are out- 
ward signs of our inner apprecia- 
tion and thanks for our Savior's 
Passion. When our Holy Rule or 
our Superiors ask what is hard to 
weak human nature, we seem to 
hear the Master saying: "Do this 
in remembrance of me." 18 Can 
there be a finer appreciation, a 
more grateful remembrance than 
"to bear the Cross of Christ with 
constancy and with a cheerful 
spirit?" 10 

Finally, gratitude calls for a re- 
payment of the favor received at 
a suitable place and time according 
to one's means. "What shall I ren- 
der to the Lord for all the things 
that he hath rendered to me? I 
will take the chalice of salvation : 
and I will call upon the name of 
the Lord."- We can, indeed, repay 
at a suitable place and time. 
"Thanksgiving in the recipient", 
says St. Thomas, "corresponds to 
the favor of the giver. . . . when 
there is greater favor . . . greater 
thanks arc due." 21 "Now of all the 
gifts." the Angelic Master points 



15 



out in another place, "which God 
has vouchsafed to mankind after 
they had fallen away by sin, the 
chief is that He gave His Son . . . 
consequently the chief sacrifice is 
that whereby Christ Himself de- 
livered Himself." 22 Now, "the Eu- 
charist is the perfect sacrament of 
our Lord's Passion, as containing 
Christ crucified." 23 Therefore, in 
the Holy Mass, we make suitable 
and perfect return for the benefits 
of redemption. Not in one place 
and at one time, but almost liter- 
ally, "from the rising of the sun 
to the going down", the name of 
Christ crucified "is great among" 
the sons of St. Paul of the Cross; 
and "in every place there is offered 
... a clean oblation." 24 Passionist 
priests, with minds recollected and 
composed, "devoutly offer up the 
Sacrifice of the Mass", and after 
its completion "give due praise 
and thanks to God." 25 

In the Holy Mass, indeed, we can 
make our best return ; but we have 
too, another way. By our Fourth 
Vow, by the ministry of our priests, 
by the labors and prayers of our 
students and brothers, we are dili- 
gently endeavoring, according to 
our strength, to promote in the 
hearts of the faithful devotion to 
the Passion of our Lord. St. Paul 
of the Cross established a mission- 
ary order; and he left to his chil- 
dren the "ingenious" 26 zeal of the 
missionary as the characteristic 
mark of them that live in the knowl- 



edge and love of the Savior of 
men. 

"No man is excused from in- 
gratitude through inability to re- 
pay," says St. Thomas, 27 "for the 
very reason that mere will suffices 
for the repayment of the debt of 
gratitude." But surely our will can 
and does find a way. Our Holy 
Founder is confident that our "pi- 
ous desire and purpose" will find 
"numerous" ways of accomplish- 
ment. 28 Let us stand "on the ways, 
and see, and ask for the old paths, 
which is the good way." 29 "Behold 
I have described it to thee three 
manner of ways . . . pass not be- 
yond the ancient bounds which thy 
fathers have set." 30 How often and 
especially when dying, did our Holy 
Founder tell us "that our spirit 
was a spirit of prayer, of solitude, 
and of poverty." 31 

Our spirit of prayer is a loving 
return for the redeeming love of 
Jesus Crucified. "In my medita- 
tion a fire shall flame out" 32 to 
consume all earthly desires and to 
light the royal way of the Cross 
for a grateful pilgrim. Thinking on 
Jesus crucified, the spirit seeks 
generously the will of the Master. 

Our solitude is sweet and rich 
when we remember that it is in- 
tended and designed to make us 
"stronger in Christian virtues . . . 
better qualified and more ready to 
preach the word of God with more 
abundant fruit, stirring up in every 
place, to the utmost of their power, 



16 



the practice of piety and a grate- 
ful remembrance of and veneration 
for the Passion and Death of Christ 
the Lord." 33 

The spirit of poverty grows from 
the memory of Christ's Passion, 
as Most Reverend Father Silvius 
reminded us in his letter on the 
Passionist Spirit. 34 Our Holy 
Founder's first idea, as given him 
by God, was a congregation of 
"men who should be detached from 
all creatures in order to be united 
to God." 35 Our Holy Founder's 
last word to us on the vow of 
poverty is the contemplation of our 
crucified Savior dying "naked on 
the Cross." 36 



As Passionists, then, in our lov- 
ing meditations upon the Passion 
of Jesus, by our fidelity to our Holy 
Rule and to our Spirit, through 
our sacred ministry, above all in 
our worthy celebration of the Holy 
Masb, we are ever keeping in grate- 
ful remembrance the Cross and 
Passion of our Lord Jesus Christ. 
We must not fall from our good 
hope of one day hearing these 
words from our Crucified Master: 
"Son of St. Paul of the Cross, Pas- 
sionist, thou hast done well by me. 
What reward will you have?" 
Through the efficacy of His Sacred 
Passion, we shall be able to answer: 
"Nothing but Thyself, Savior 
Crucified." 



l Coloss. 1:3-10. 2 Ibid. 13-14. 3 Ibid. 10-20. 4 Tbid. 3:17; 4:2. 5 Cfr. Pius XTT. Myst. 
Corporis, n. 35-38. 6 Coloss. 1:12-14. 7 Holy Rule, n. 177. 8 S. Theol., II-II, 107, a. 2. 9 Holy 
Rule, nn. 3, 4. 10 I-II, 51, a. 3. n Galat. 3:24. 12 Holy Rule, n. 170. 13 Holy Rule, nn. 79, 
17. 14 Galat. 2:20. 15 Cfr. St. Thorn, in Galat. 2:20. 16 Raccolta, n. 162. 17 Holy Rule, 
n. 305. 18 Luke 22:20. 19 Holy Rule, n. 37. 20 Ps. 115:12-13. 2111-11, 106, a. 2. 22 I-II, 102, 
a. 3. 23 HI, 73, a. 5 ad 2. 24 Cfr. Malach. 1:11. 25 Holy Rule, nn. 163, 197, 164. 26 Cfr. 
Holy Rule, n. 132. 27 107, a. 1, ad 2. 28 Holy Rule, n. 132. 29 Jer. 6:16. 30 Prov. 22:20.28. 
31 Regul., n. 94. 32 Ps. 38:4. 33 Holy Rule, n. 10. 34 Letter, p. 4. 35 Regul., n. 94. 36 Holy 
Rule, n. 120. 




17 



Requiescat in Pace! 



Bonaventure of the 



UOLY CROSS community was 
* awakened from normal routine 
on the evening of Monday, Novem- 
ber 15, 1948, by the death sum- 
mons which came to one of its 
members. 

Father Bonaventure of the As- 
sumption, superior of the Retreat 
at Bethany in Palestine, and mem- 
ber of Holy Cross Province, was 
sojourning at our Retreat of Holy 
Cross awaiting the propitious mo- 




Fr. Bonaventure, shortly before en- 
tering the Passionists, wearing his 
graduation medals. 



Assumption 

ment when he might return to his 
community in Palestine. By God's 
inscrutable design, it was ordered 
that he should not again leave the 
United States on earthly mission, 
but instead, return to his Father 
in heaven. 

For several years this good Fa- 
ther had been a sick man. Sup- 
posedly recovered from a series of 
operations performed in St. Louis 
during 1944, he carried the heavy 
cross of an abdominal misery. In 
early November of this year, he 
complained of a bowel constriction 
and upon advice of the Doctor went 
to Good Samaritan Hospital in Cin- 
cinnati for observation. Diagnosis 
indicated that an immediate oper- 
ation was necessary, to which he 
submitted. Hope was entertained 
that, should no infections set in, 
he would soon be restored to normal 
function. However, a fit of cough- 
ing over which he had no control, 
burst open the wound of the former 
operation, and surgery again be- 
came imperative. This was Sunday 
afternoon, November 14. From 
then on, grave doubts were ex- 
pressed by both Doctors and nurses 
that he would rally. He did not, 
and on the evening of Monday, the 
15th, he calmly breathed his last. 



18 



The Fathers who attended at his 
bedside tell us that he was con- 
scious to the end, repeating after 
them tender ejaculations to our 
Crucified Lord and His Blessed 
Mother. On being handed the cru- 
cifix, he pressed it earnestly to his 
lips. 

The Province of Holy Cross, as 
well as the Order at large, has 
given back to God a religious and 
priest of whom we may well be 
proud. On whose record there 
stands no stain, and whose virtue 
stood forth to edify. His title he 
carried aloft, and was never a- 
shamed. In all probability, there 
has never been an American Pas- 
sionist better known throughout 
the Provinces of the Order. His 
missions took on the nature of the 
international, so that he became a 
veritable cosmopolite. What with 
assignments in Rome, Palestine, 
and canonical visitation of Prov- 
inces in Italy, England, Ireland, 
Australia, Poland, etc., his con- 
tacts with Passionist personnel 
were indeed on a wide scale. 

Kentucky was the native State 
of this very large and imposing 
man. Paul J. Oberst was born in 
Owensboro, October 14, 1881. 
Through a chum at Christian 
Brothers College, St. Louis, by the 
name of Charley Kendrick, later 
known among us as Father Stephen 
of the Holy Ghost, Paul came to 
learn of the Passionist Order. As 
Charley was well on the way to 



enter, both decided to cast their 
lots together and entered the no- 
vitiate at Pittsburgh in the year 
1900. 

Ordained to the priesthood in 
1907, the active career of this tal- 
ented youth got under way. Lector 
and spiritual director of students 
for approximately eight years, he 
was elected to rectorship of our 
community at St. Paul, Kansas; 
then, of our Retreat in Chicago : 
1914-1920. After serving as Vicar 
for three years, the Chapter of 
1923 chose him as 2nd Consultor. 
About this time the foundation in 
Germany stood greatly in need of 
priests and he was appealed to. 

Fr. Bonaventure, on the day of his 
profession. 




In the Chapter of 1926, Father 
Bonaventure surrendered his pas- 
sive voice, in order that he might 
volunteer for this mission. He re- 
mained in Germany, serving in 
various offices, until summoned to 
Rome to attend the General Chapter 
in 1931. There he was elected 1st 
General Consultor. Six years hence 
he was chosen the 2nd General 
Consultor, in which office he con- 
tinued for nine years, until the 
Chapter of 1947. 

Again, the call of the needy 
found him willing to accept the as- 
signment by Father General to take 
over as superior at Bethany. This 
cosmopolitan community, though 
small, called for a leader of genius 
and understanding. The political 
and highly confused condition pre- 
vailing in Palestine made this office 
one of serious moment. Struggling 
in impoverishment and with scarce 
a response to appeals made to his 
brethren in America, Father Bona- 
venture was left to carry the double 
load of caring for bodily needs of 
his brethren and responsibility for 
spiritual maintenance. 

So tense became the political sit- 
uation about him, that, as an 
American citizen, he was forced to 
leave, much as he wanted to stay. 
He returned to his Province in May 
of this year, to await the oppor- 
tunity when it would be feasible 
to return. Up until the time of 
his death he remained their supe- 
rior and directed from this dis- 



tance as best he could. He cher- 
ished the thought that soon he 
would return and cast in his lot 
with their hardships for the rest 
of his life. However, God was sat- 
isfied, and terminated the service 
of this zealous Passionist after al- 
most forty-two years of priestly 
activity, spent practically without 
interruption in one or other office 
of responsibility. 

Rather emboldened he becomes 
who would take to himself the right 
to appraise and classify the charac- 
ter of a brother. We know Father 
Bonaventure as we saw him, ob- 
served his thought, in word and 
conduct. Of this only may we speak. 
Time and calm judgment will no 
doubt bring to light much that at 
the moment seems obscured, if not 
confused. When we notice the faults 
of one against the backdrop of his 
virtue, there is begotten a chari- 
tably mild interpretation, the prin- 
ciple and motive assert themselves, 
and the otherwise glaring blunder 
becomes so often but a matter of 
mistaken judgment. 

The patent fact of continued ser- 
vice in offices of responsibility at- 
tests that his worth was recog- 
nized by Capitular Fathers both in 
Provincial and General assembly. 
Indeed, he was not popular as we 
attribute the term to the good-fel- 
low, the easy-going and easily-dis- 
pensing superior. Father Bonaven- 
ture was a disciplinarian, and con- 
sistent to the point of observing 



20 



the restrictions he expected of oth- 
ers. Trained in the old school, he 
could not adjust himself to the new 
ideologies becoming more and more 
prevalent. Any letdown to the en- 
croachments of the modern and 
worldly mind found him alert and 
outspoken in defense of what he 
believed the spirit of St. Paul of 
the Cross. The old traditions, cus- 
toms, regulations and rules he 
learned so well, were jealously cher- 
ished. It pained him to witness 
innovation or surrender in what- 
ever form. Embarrassment and 
fear of criticism were not weak- 
nesses to which he would give in. 
Indeed, he was sensitive of soul, 
which tells us that to maintain 
what he believed to be the right 
course, caused him no little suf- 
fering. 

Withal, this juridical attitude, so 
noticeable, did not lessen the chari- 
ty £.nd kindness one would expect 
from a superior. Those living un- 
der his administration, be they 
priests, students, or brothers, 
found him to be ever considerate 
and solicitous. This is emphatically 
true of the sick and infirm. Noth- 
ing was spared to promote their 
comfort. 

Father Bonaventure was not en- 
dowed with the virtue, if it be a 
virtue, of suavity of manner, that 
so often clothes real sentiment un- 
der pleasantries and double talk. 
His sincerity was true. It could 
easily be detected in his dealings 



with others. As a superior, he could 
say Yes and he could say No with 
equal emphasis, as the case might 
warrant. Prayerful vigilance in 
upholding the spirit of the Order 
gave him courage to blend the vir- 
tues of fairness and kindness. He 
played no favorites and harbored 
no particular friendships. Because 
of this he so often stood alone, 
misunderstood. 

Friends and benefactors of our 
monasteries found in him a grati- 
tude that did not cease upon his 




Very Rev. Fr. Bonaventure, 1943, 
when he was General Consultor. 



21 



giving up of local office. The little 
card or letter from time to time 
bespoke his thought of those who 
were kind to the Passionists. He 
would inquire after their well-being 
and impart to them bits of inter- 
esting news as he journeyed over 
the world. With his multiple cares 
and heavy correspondence, the bene- 
factors, however slight their bene- 
factions, were never slighted. 

Father was gifted with a splen- 
did mind and loved books. Studi- 
ous inclination was manifest from 
earliest student days. Never an 
idler, there were always fields of 
knowledge to explore, that thus he 
might equip himself the better for 
his particular work. Here in Cin- 
cinnati, right up to the end, in his 
spare moments he was applying 
himself to gain a good working 
knowledge of the Arabic language 
against the day he would return 
to Palestine. With little taste for 
the sports and recreations normal 
to youth, exercise served only one 
purpose, to keep him physically fit. 
Being of more serious turn, he 
would enjoy conversation on sub- 
jects of moment, while the lighter 
chat of the brethren left him flat. 

His attitude of recollection be- 
spoke a spirit of prayer, so essen- 
tial to the religious who would 



excel in the monastic way of life, 
and so paramount a requisite for 
him who would essay the role of 
superior to a religious community. 
The choir was not a burden, nor 
meditation a thing to be shunned. 
One may say, that herein he led 
his brethren, and was ever num- 
bered among those present. He was 
a community man, living in and 
with his brothers in family concern. 
And, when head of the family, he 
would seek to foster the family 
spirit. 

It would seem that Providence 
had not marked him to be a mis- 
sionary in our sense of the word. 
Retreats and conferences to reli- 
gious communities engaged him 
only intermittently. Monastic vir- 
tues were salient qualities. With 
truth may we call him the "Good 
Monk". 

In the heavenly choir there are 
blended voices, for "omnis spiritus 
laudet Dominum". Our Father 
Bonaventure has gone to take his 
place in the category chosen by 
himself, in the group led by our 
Holy Founder. Should his entrance 
be delayed, let us his brethren still 
in the flesh, beseech in prayer for 
his speedy release. 

May he rest in peace! 




22 



%e 

Missionary 

FORUM 

• IDEALS 

• TRADITIONS 

• TECHNIQUES 

• LETTERS 

• EXAMPLES 

• SUGGESTIONS 



+ 




RESOLUTIONS and RECOMMENDATIONS 

MISSIONARY CONFERENCE 
ST. LOUIS, JULY 31— AUGUST 2, 1945. 



FOR the convenience of the mis- 
sionaries and as an easy refer- 
ence we have formulated the resolu- 
tions and recommendations of the 
delegates to our first Missionary 
Conference in Holy Cross Province. 
In his Foreword to the report 



published in the Bulletin, Oct. 28, 
1945, Father Provincial (Herman) 
remarked: "Since the Missionary 
Conference possessed no legislative 
power, its resolutions or decisions 
have no binding force unless they 
are confirmed by the General or 

23 



FORUM 



Provincial Curia or by Provincial 
Chapter. But they do furnish a 
valuable guide in drawing up any 
necessary legislation." 

There being no official confirma- 
tion by the General or Provincial 



Curia or our late Provincial Chap- 
ter, as of this date, the findings 
of this Conference may be regard- 
ed only as valuable aids to an ap- 
preciation of Passionist mission 
procedure in Holy Cross Province. 



ADVERTISING FOR MISSION WORK 

(Committee: Frs. Cyril, Maurice, Pius). 



1 — A discreet publicity for our 
work is recommended, such as in- 
formative articles in papers about 
the Passionists, their history, their 
spirit, their work. 

2 — The Conference expresses 
general disapproval of advertising 
in the obnoxious sense, of ballyhoo, 
of high-powered salesmanship. The 
word "advertising" is frowned up- 



on, "promotion" is the term rec- 
ommended. 

3 — Fieldmen soliciting missions 
is unanimously rejected. 

4 — Once a mission has been ac- 
cepted, it is the mind of the Con- 
ference that the widest publicity 
be given it in local papers and by 
other available means. 



SACRED ELOQUENCE 

(Committee: Frs. as above). 



1 — It is strongly recommended 
that our student priests receive a 
full year of Sacred Eloquence, and 
that they be assigned no office until 
the completion of said full year. 

2 — External works that might 
interfere with this course are dis- 
approved. 

3 — Formal training of the lector 
of Sacred Eloquence is not favored, 



but the Conference urges that op- 
portunity be given him to seek 
whatever he deems necessary or 
helpful to his teaching. 

4— To the lector of Sacred Elo- 
quence is left the option of select- 
ing a course of reading for his 
students, but such a selection im- 
posed for one or two years after 
the course is deemed impracticable. 



PREPARATION FOR THE MINISTRY 

(Committee: Frs. Alexander, Valentine, Elmer) 
1 — The recommendation of the five years following ordination, 
committee, that for a period of priests be obliged to submit their 



24 



FORUM 



sermons for approval is not ac- 
ceptable, because, the Holy Rule, 
Ch. XXIV. Sec. 193, sets no time 
limit, thus leaving the Father Pro- 
vincial free to call for examination 
and approval of sermons at any 
time agreeable to him. 

2 — In order to stimulate mission- 
ary "morale," the Conference ur- 
ges the revival of the old custom 
of the missioners meeting our pre- 
paratory and professed students, 
and addressing them even though 
informally. 

3 — Missionaries are recommend- 
ed to use the "Treasury of Spiritual 
Works" blanks to be found in all 
our retreats. 



4 — The study of Spanish is heart- 
ily recommended, in view of our 
expanding work in the southwest- 
ern States. Young priests inter- 
ested in this type of missions 
should be given opportunity to 
learn Spanish. 

5 — It is recommended that the 
Father Rector and others con- 
cerned, submit to the Father Pro- 
vincial at the time of Visitation, 
the names of the young priests 
deemed qualified for missions, sub- 
mitting at the same time a state- 
ment as to the quantity of sermons 
and the quality of the immediate 
preparedness. 



PRELIMINARIES TO THE CONDUCT OF MISSIONS 

(Committee: Frs. Ignatius, Emmanuel, Clarence) 



1 — Is is recommended that the 
appointing of missionaries be re- 
turned to the hands of the Father 
Provincial. 

2 — A special secretary whose sole 
duty is to handle mission matters 
is suggested. Said secretary should 
be a priest of age and experience, 
preferably, and not a member of 
the Curia. 

3 — Missionaries may continue to 
accept personal requests for their 
services, dependent always on the 
permission of the superior con- 
cerned. 



4 — In order to expedite applica- 
tions for work, the missionaries 
should have on hand application 
blanks for this purpose. 

5 — When two or more are as- 
signed to a mission, the superior 
selected for the mission should be 
promptly corresponded with by the 
others. 

6 — The suggestion to withhold 
from mission work priests who hold 
offices of any kind, is disapproved 
as being contrary to Our Regula- 
tions, Sec. 157. 



25 



FORUM 



PRIVILEGES 

(Committee: Frs. Eugene, Basil, Philip) 



1 — Exemptions, called "Literary 
Privileges," when deemed advisa- 
ble, are to be regarded as within 
the jurisdiction of the local supe- 
rior, with the implied hope that 
he will be generous. 

2 — Literary Privileges are inter- 
preted as legitimate when prepara- 
tion is necessary for preaching as- 
signments, such as Novena, Special 
retreats, etc. 



3 — Privileges of rest following 
mission and retreat work, occa- 
sional parish work, days of recol- 
lection, Holy Week, especially when 
a Tre Ore is preached, confessions 
of and conferences to sisters, late 
Masses on week days, are to be 
submitted to the next Provincial 
Chapter (August 1947) for inter- 
pretation and suitable legislation. 



CEREMONIES 



1 — Wearing of mantle on retreats 
in winter time remains optional. 
It should not be worn in the sum- 
mer. 

2 — Should a missionary be un- 
able to wear sandals during time 
of mission let his companions do 
likewise. 



3 — Candles are to be lighted on 
the altar during the rosary; at the 
Cross on the platform during mis- 
sion services. 

4 — Religious articles may be 
blessed after both morning and 
evening services. 



MISSION LITERATURE 

(Committee: Frs. Benedict, Stanislaus, Valentine) 



1 — It is recommended that a 
committee be appointed by Father 
Provincial to revise all our mission 
literature, viz: application forms, 
instruction to pastors, dodgers ad- 
vertising mission, Station leaflets, 
Calvarian leaflets, remembrance 
leaflets, responses for opening and 
closing of the mission. 



2 — It is desirable that the Co- 
operative Press (Normandy) han- 
dle the printing, and the Provincial 
Office the distribution in advance 
of each mission. An exception is 
made for Remembrance leaflets or 
cards which will continue to be 
provided by the firm supplying the 
religious goods for the mission. 



26 



FORUM 



3 — A committee to revise the 
"Manual for Missionaries" in ac- 
cordance with exact wording of 
Indults, is recommended. 

There should be incorporated in 
this revision a clear statement of 



faculties to grant indulgences, dis- 
pensations, absolutions. 

A theology of the "Little Office" 
should be compiled and added to 
the proposed new Directory. 



PROCEDURE DURING MISSIONS 

(Committee: Frs. Charles, Alban, Richard) 



1 — The alternating by preachers 
each night rather than each week 
should be left to the discretion of 
the missionaries. 

2 — All levity and novelty in ser- 
mons is to be reported to the Fa- 
ther Provincial for suitable action. 

3 — The practices of using stories 
and jokes just for the sake of a 
laugh ; of missioners bantering and 
kidding one another on the plat- 
form; of seeking stage effects, and 
using freak sermons and titles, are 
condemned. Announcements should 
be curtailed. 

4 — We should keep to our preach- 
ing material. Any change in sub- 
ject matter should be rejected, — 



not, however, excluding new ap- 
proaches which should be constant- 
ly sought. 

5 — The old custom of dividing 
the morning instructions, allowing 
three for the Commandments and 
three for the Passion should be 
maintained. An equal division on 
a two weeks' mission, with the 
option of the schedule for one week, 
or the first week given to the Com- 
mandments and the second to the 
Passion, is advised. 

6 — It should be permitted to de- 
vote the sermon period on one eve- 
ning to an enlarged instruction on 
the Commandments if advisable. 



8 
INSTRUCTIONS ON SACRAMENT OF PENANCE 

(Committee: Frs. Matthias, Roland, Paschal) 



1 — When two or more are con- 
ducting a mission, the instructions 
on the Sacrament of Penance 
should be given on the customary 



evenings by him who preaches the 
sermon. 

2 — It should be optional with the 
missionaries to give these instruc- 



27 



FORUM 



tions at our usual time, or to com- 
bine them into one in place of an 
evening sermon. 

3 — The length of time occupied 
by evening services should extend 
to approximately one hour on City 
missions, and one and a quarter 
hours in country places. 



4 — If desired, a short sermon 
after Masses, not designated as 
Mission Masses, may be given, with 
the caution, however, that the regu- 
lar motives and instructions fol- 
lowing the mission Masses be not 
omitted. 



THE DIRECTORY 

(Committee: Frs. Charles, George, Lambert) 



1 — It is recommended that either 
a new Directory or a supplement 
thereto be prepared, following a 
trial period and a discussion by 
the missionaries of the Province, 
of the recommendations of this 
Conference. 

2 — Regarding the platform used 
on missions, it is proposed to strike 
out the words "four or five feet 
high" in the Directory (No. 16. 
page 23). That both size and height 
of platform be determined by cir- 
cumstances of church and sanctu- 
ary, however, adhering to the cus- 
tom of not exceeding the level of 
the communion rail. Where the 
sanctuary floor is approximately as 
high as the communion rail, it 
should be used in place of a plat- 
form. 

3 — The prohibition of wholesale 



autographing of prayer books in 
order to stimulate sales is recom- 
mended to be incorporated into the 
Directory in paragraph 25, page 
27. 

4 — A change is advised in par. 
No. 25. page 27, to permit the 
hearing of confessions during the 
regular mission Masses. No time 
limit should be set for hearing 
confessions after the evening ser- 
vices, thus striking out no. 29. 
page 29. Part 5. of the Directory. 

5 — In order to permit blessing 
of religious articles after the eve- 
ning services, par. No. 37. page 34. 
should be reworded. 

6 — An alteration of par. 46. page 
38 should be made so as to allow 
notices in newspapers without a- 
waiting the Provincial's permission. 



10 
MISSION OPENING 

(Committee: Frs. Ignatius, Stanislaus, Clarence) 
1 — The opening procession should carry the Mission Cross, let one 
never be omitted. If the local of the missionaries do so. 
clergy be unable or unwilling to 



28 



FORUM 



11 
MISCELLANEOUS 

(Committee: Frs. Ambrose, Basil, Pius) 



1 — Whilst wholeheartedly prais- 
ing the Stations of the Cross book- 
let by Father Maurice, C.P., of our 
Province, and endorsing its pro- 
motion, the mind of the Conference 
is that it is not to replace our 
customary Stations leaflet, which of 
course, the author never intended. 

2 — Mission trunks for personal 
use are approved of, and it is 
urged that some arrangement, with 
Provincial endorsement be worked 
out in order to realize it. 

3 — With the understanding of 
the superior of the mission, it 



should be left to the missionaries 
when to start hearing confessions. 
However, the Saturday before the 
mission should be excluded. 

4 — Street preaching is given ap- 
proval and encouragement for those 
so inclined and gifted. 
Editor's note: Since the above Res- 
olutions and Recommendations have 
not as yet been officially approved, 
further observation and comment 
would seem to be in order. We 
invite discussion in the pages of 
the Forum. 



One View ok a Passicnid Ulissienalu 



N 



outburst of 



I in an excessive 
' descriptive extravaganza, a pop- 
ular fiction writer portrayed a Doc- 
tor character in one of his novels 
as an individual who "slept medi- 
cine, lived medicine, thought medi- 
cine, ate medicine, breathed medi- 
cine, drank medicine, talked medi- 
cine, and dreamed medicine." 

Naturally, this hyperbolic rhetor- 
ic intended to convey the extent 
to which the love, study, and prac- 
tice of the medical profession dom- 
inated the man's life. It became 



an obsession, or perhaps even a 
fetish with him. 

All of which is merely express- 
ing the idea that some one passion 
can become so dominating a factor 
in one's life as to drive the indi- 
vidual relentlessly to devotedness 
and achievements which lesser en- 
thusiasm cannot appreciate. 

This was also the significant mo- 
tif behind the Scriptural reference 
to St. Paul before his conversion, 
here it is said of him that "he 
breathed threats against the Chris- 
tians." 



29 



FORUM 



St. Paul was a man of vehement 
contrasts. Whatever he did, he did 
vigorously, and even violently. 

We can visualize him mercilessly 
rowelling his lathering mount to 
top speed in his headlong gallop 
to Damascus with letters of arrest 
in his saddle bags. 

The belabored beast's forelegs 
suddenly stick in the earth, somer- 
saulting the rider over his head 
to have him crash to the ground, 
knocking the wind out of him. 

With the return of conscious- 
ness, still enveloped in a cloud of 
desert dust, Saul hears a voice. 
He wondered how long he had been 
unconscious and who could have 
caught up with him out on the 
desert. But the voice came from 
the apparition seen only by the 
horse, that made him so unexpect- 
edly stiffen to an abrupt and jar- 
ring halt. Saul saw no one. 

But when the voice of the un- 
seen presence asked quietly and 
softly: "Saul ... Saul, why do you 
persecute me?", Saul's resourceful- 
ness and daring were ready. Fear- 
lessly he responded: "Well, Sir, 
speak. Who are you?" The answer 
to that was a metamorphosis. "I 
am the Jesus of Nazareth whom 
you are persecuting." 

By the time Saul got shakily to 
his feet and the dust cloud cleared, 
a transformation was in the mak- 
ing. A new man rose from the 



ground, a blind man. But it was 
a blindness that was exchanged for 
a sight that was also light of a 
different kind, a light so dazzling 
and piercing that It blinded him 
to everything else in the world but 
the source from whence the light 
emerged. Saul became a man of 
new vehemence and new passion. 
In this new experience and new 
discovery, the new man Paul was 
born, who envisioned unlimited 
possibilities of devotedness, attach- 
ment, and achievement. The wild 
intensity of his nature rendered 
him even impotent of adequately 
expressing his thoughts and in- 
spirations. For what he wanted to 
tell beggared even angelic powers 
of word coining. He could break 
through that baffling barrier only 
by characteristically resorting to 
reckless extremes in opposites and 
contrasts. In his new-found over- 
mastering love for the Crucified 
whom he first met unseen in the 
desert, he was expressing an epito- 
me of the entire scheme of crea- 
tion, redemption and salvation : 
"We preach Christ and Him Cru- 
cified!" To his synthesizing mind, 
this embraced and expressed every- 
thing. The initiated in the Passion 
would understand. 

But to make his attitude unmis- 
takable to any who might doubt 
his sincerity, he recklessly and al- 
most rashly, though none-the-less 
bluntly, declares that he considers 



30 



FORUM 



everything else in the world as 
just so much manure by compari- 
son with the high knowledge of 
Jesus Christ Crucified. 

Here we have the ideal Passion- 
ist spirit; reducing everything to 
the applicability of the Passion and 
Death of Christ. For as the Apos- 
tle says, the Passion of Christ is 
the manifestation of the Power 
and the Wisdom of God. It is the 
source of all being, and therefore, 
the embodiment of the entire 
scheme of God's Providence. Every- 
thing must be reducible to the 
Passion and Death of Christ. 

Just as St. Paul "breathed 
threats" against the Christians, so, 
after he felt the full impact of that 
Power and Wisdom in his soul, he 
went off the deep end for the Chris- 
tians. Floundering about for a 
sufficiently vigorous phrasing of his 
meaning, he declares that he would 
be willing to go to hell for them! 
Thus obsessed was he with the 
idea of Christ Crucified and what 
that Crucifixion and Death meant 
to human souls. This obsession 
was the leaven that impregnated 
the whole substance of his being, 
which made him avow: "I live, but 
it is not I who live, it is Christ 
Who lives in me." "For me to live 
is Christ." 

So a Passionist Missionary can 
color and condition every statement 
of Dogma, Morals, Devotion, with 



the Passion of Christ. The perfume 
of the Passion can give a heavenly 
aroma to all his sermons. The Pas- 
sion can be the vitalizing and vivi- 
fying principle of all his utter- 
ances, as it was with St. Paul the 
Apostle and St. Paul the Founder. 
He need but be imbued with the 
Passion of Our Lord to the extent 
that he too, can say : "For me to 
live is Christ." 

Fr. Hilary, C.P. 




Father Timothy, Silver Jubilarian. 



31 



Regarding our Rules 



lus Particulate C.P. 



In the preceding titles we have considered the material element of the Congregation. Now 
we turn to the formal element, or government. First we shall treat of the Rules, Regulations, 
and Customs. 

Rules, Regulations and Customs. 

(Pt. 7, T. V., Ch. I) 




EXISTENCE 



103. 



Article 3 
The Obligation of the Rules. 

Rules 



are not 



mere counsels, they 
are laws; and the effect of law is 
obligation. "Law", says St. Thom- 
as, "takes its name from ligando 
(binding), because it binds one to 
the performance of something." 14 
And Suarez affirms that the inten- 
tion of making a law and that of 
binding through it are one and the 
same thing, because the essential 
act required in the mind of the 
legislator is the will to oblige those 
subject to him. 15 Thus, each and 
every Religious, Superiors as well 
as subjects, are bound by the ob- 
ligation of "living according to the 
Rules and Constitutions of their 
Institute." 16 

104. The obligation 
inherent in a law 
regards either the 
mere placing or omitting of an 
action, or of undergoing a penalty, 



OBLIGATION 
OF OUR RULE 



or of both. In the first case, the 
law is merely a moral law, and 
its transgression carries with it 
guilt, but it is not punished in the 
external forum ; in the second case, 
the law is merely penal, and obli- 
ges only to the submission to the 
penalty; in the third case, the law 
is called a mixed law, and is for- 
tified by the sanction both of sin 
and of undergoing the penalty. 17 

But because the quality of the 
obligation depends on the mind of 
the legislator, which is most often 
manifested in the words of the 
law itself, we must look into the 
content of the Rules themselves, 
whenever there is question of de- 
termining the obligation of a Rule. 

Now our Rule excludes obligation 
under pain of mortal sin; ls but it 
neither affirms nor denies an ob- 
ligation under venial sin. Further- 
more, there is nothing to be found 



32 



in decrees of General Chapters re- 
garding this question. Taking com- 
mon principles into consideration, 
it seems that we must admit that 
our Rules bind under venial sin, 
and therefore that they are not 
merely penal laws. For, in fact, 
every law binds under pain of sin, 
unless the legislator restricts the 
obligation solely to the penalty. 
Now such a restriction is not to be 
found in our Rules. The argument 
based on the doctrine of St. Thomas 
is mentioned in the letter "De Spiri- 
tu Congregationis" of Father Gen- 
eral Leo of the Sacred Heart of 
Jesus, in these words : "We have 
called religious discipline obliga- 
tory . . . because it is the teaching 
of St. Thomas (II,II,q.l86,a.6) that 
the precepts of every Rule bind of 
their very nature, either sub gravi 
or sub levi, unless the Rule itself 
asserts the contrary. Thus, it fol- 
lows that our Rule obliges at least 
sub levi." 10 

This conclusion is confirmed by 
a comparison of the text of 1746 
with that of 1741. In the latter, 
all obligation under pain of sin is 
excluded : "These Rules do not 
oblige under any sin whatever" ; 
however, there was a special penal- 
ty for each transgression, as is 
evident from the whole 38th Chap- 
ter. Therefore, at that time, the 
Rules were merely penal. In the 
text of 1746, however, the chapter 
on penalties was completely sup- 
pressed, and there was inserted, 



with regard to the quality of the 
obligation : "The Rules and Con- 
stitutions do not make the Breth- 
ren guilty of mortal sin", as we 
read today. 2 " It is evident from 
the parallel passage which speaks 
of fasting that this change in the 
text was made deliberately and in- 
tentionally. For, in the 1741 text, 
Chapter 20 is thus inscribed : 
"Concerning the observance of the 
fast, though without any obligation 
under sin, except when it is com- 
manded by Holy Mother the 
Church" ; whereas, in the 1746 text, 
concerning the same fast it is stat- 
ed: "There is no fast prescribed 
in the Congregation which makes 
transgressors guilty of mortal sin." 
It is evident therefore that in 
the new text the will of the legis- 
lator was to exclude an obligation 
under mortal sin, but not under 
venial sin. Nevertheless, to remove 
all doubt, the decision of competent 
authority would be desirable. 

105. There is a- 



OBLIGATION 
PER ACCIDENS 



greement among 
authors, says Ver- 
meersch, 21 that there are several 
causes on account of which the 
violation of the Rules, though not 
in themselves binding under sin, 
yet may incur venial sin. For this 
there is a three-fold reason: 

1) From the concurrence of an- 
other law, or a vow. Thus a viola- 
tion of the Rule for keeping the 
fast can be a sin against temper- 
ance or against the law of the 



33 



Church. Likewise a sin against a 
vow is always present whenever 
the Rule is violated "in those mat- 
ters which touch closely upon the 
religious vows." 22 

2) From the sinful internal af- 
fection of the agent. Thus, for ex- 
ample, if the transgression comes 
about through negligence, passion, 
contempt, etc. . . . 23 

3) From the consequences: name- 
ly, on account of scandal, for ex- 
ample, if by your deed you lead 
others into sinful violations ; and 



because of the upsetting of the do- 
mestic order, and the relaxed re- 
ligious discipline which follows. 
For a religious, Sanchez remarks, 24 
is bound under pain of sin to con- 
duct himself in such a way that 
he will not be a danger to his in- 
stitute, inducing others by his bad 
example to relax the Rule, such as 
if he were unwilling to keep si- 
lence, or pray, or maintain an or- 
derly conduct, or if he entered the 
cells of all the religious, or trans- 
gressed such like precepts. 



Article 4 
Reading and Interpretation of the Rules. 



PRIVATE 
READING 



106. The Rules and Con- 
stitutions cannot be 
rightly observed unless 
they are perfectly known. To ob- 
tain this necessary knowledge is 
ordained first of all private read- 
ing, to be made from the time of 
the novitiate, as Canon 565 and 
Question 18 of the "Relatio Quin- 
quennalis" direct. 

St. Paul of the Cross often com- 
mended private reading of the 
Rules. On August 16, 1759, in a 
letter sent to all the retreats of 
the Congregation, he commanded 
that each religious, not excepting 
those lay brothers who knew how 
to read, should have a written copy 
of the Constitutions, and read them 
often. 2 "' In the text of the Rule 
itself, n. 321, all religious are ex- 
horted to read them with simple 
and sincere eyes. 



PUBLIC 
READING 



Those brethren, therefore, are 
worthy of praise, who, continuing 
the custom of the novitiate, never 
omit to make their daily reading of 
some passage of the Rules. 26 

107. Public reading of 
the Rules, to be made 
on specified days, is im- 
posed by precept. 27 The obligation 
directly affects Superiors. 

Among us, this reading is made 
in the refectory, on two days of 
the week, Thursdays and Sundays, 
towards the end of the evening 
meal ; saving the power of the 
Chapter of each Province to ordain 
otherwise, as long as the reading 
takes place twice a week. 28 

108. A law 
should be mani- 
fest, says Gra- 
tian, and should not be so obscure 



INTERPRETATION 
OF LAW 



34 



as to lead into error. But it is 
impossible to obtain this absolute- 
ly, and for that reason, lest the 
efficacy of the law be frustrated, it 
is necessary to interpret the law. 

Interpretation is a declaration 
of the genuine meaning of the law. 
It is called authentic, if it is made 
by a person possessing public auth- 
ority; private, if made by private 
persons, and usual, if made by 
legitimate custom. 

Authentic interpretation can be 
given by means of a judicial sen- 
tence, or by rescript, and by means 
of a law. However, this can be 
declarative, extensive, restrictive, 
or explanatory, inasmuch as it de- 
clares a law which is certain in 
itself, or extends it, restricts it, 
or explains a doubt about the law. 

Interpretation by means of law 
has the same force as the law it- 
self; but, aside from the declara- 
tive interpretation, it is not retro- 
active, and requires promulgation. 
However, when given by means of 
a sentence or rescript, it obliges 
only the persons to whom it is 
directed. 29 

Private interpretation, proposed 
by learned men and those skilled 
in law, is commonly called doctrin- 
al, and its weight rests entirely on 



the arguments brought forward. 

Usual interpretation, made by 
custom, which is the best inter- 
preter of the law, 30 has the force 
of law, if all the conditions of legiti- 
mate custom are in evidence. 

109. Besides the 



INTERPRETATION 
OF OUR RULES 



Roman Pontiff 
and the Sacred 
Congregation of Religious, the Gen- 
eral Chapter, and, outside the time 
of Chapter, the General and his 
Consultors, can authentically inter- 
pret our Rules. 31 

However, the General Chapter 
and the General are unable to give 
restrictive or extensive interpreta- 
tions of the Rule; for "if there is 
anything in the Rule, which ex- 
perience shows should be changed, 
added, or suppressed" they can de- 
cide only to have these things re- 
ferred to the Apostolic See. 32 

Religious are forbidden to in- 
terpret the Rule privately; for it 
is their duty to read them with 
simple eyes and fulfill them with a 
simple heart. 33 Nevertheless, it 
seems that these words, which refer 
to the practice of religious perfec- 
tion, do not forbid a doctrinal in- 
terpretation, which is made accord- 
ing to the norms of the doctors 
and the practice of our elders. 



i» St. Thomas. Summa Theol. Il.II.q.nO. ait.."). U8 Suarez. De Letfibus, lib. Ill, c.20. n. 5. 
18 Can. 59:5. 17 Veimeersch, Epitome Iur. Can. (Romae 1929) I. n. 7:;. 18 Regola n. 320. 
li» Bollotino, VIII, p. 227 in nota. 20 Rejmla n. 320. 21 Vermeersch De Rellg. Instit. et. Person is 
(Bragis 1907) I, n.232. 22 Regola n. 820. 28 S. Thomas, Summa Theolog. II. II. q. 186, a. 9. 
ad 1. 24 Sanchez. In Decal.. lib. 6. cap. 94. n.lS. 25 Lettere. IV., p. 254. Cfr. Annali. III. 
p. 304. 28 Sylloge, n.3li. 27 Can. 509. 2.1. Reg. n. 32:'.. 28Statuta, n. 152; Sylloge, n.811, 
2t»Can.l7. 30 Reg. n.322. 32 Bulla Supremi A post. Tar. 5. 88 Regula. n. 321. 



35 



Semper Orate! 



iJi ^Lasslonist and zLtayer 



THERE are few of us who would 
question the fact that there 
is such a thing as 'progress in 
prayer'. Our common acceptance 
of such books as Tanquery's SPIR- 
ITUAL LIFE, with its degrees of 
prayer, both Leen's and Lehody's 
books, PROGRESS IN MENTAL 
PRAYER, Scaremelli, Poulain, Sau- 
dreau, Lagrange, — all of whom 
treat of the 'three ways' of the 
spiritual life and 'progress' in men- 
tal prayer, — I say the common ac- 
ceptance of such books would make 
it rash for anyone to deny that 
there is such a thing as 'progress' 
in mental prayer. 

Now the purpose of this article 
is to show that for a Passionist, 
progress in mental prayer and prog- 
ress in the spiritual life itself are 
practically identical. Subsequent 
articles will outline some of the 
principal directions that the saints, 
and especially our Holy Founder 
give us for leading a life of prayer. 

Let us start out with the gen- 
eral description of the progress 
of a soul in the ways of prayer 
according to the commonly accepted 
teaching. 

If you were to ask a beginner, 
"How are you coming along in the 
spiritual life?", he would probably 
question himself somewhat as fol- 
lows : "How am I keeping the 

36 



rules? How is my obedience? my 
charity ? mortification ? patience ? 
etc." He would think principally 
of his observance of his rules and 
the practice of the virtues. With- 
out making the distinction, he 
would have in mind principally the 
moral virtues. And that is as it 
should be. The first years of the 
spiritual life are taken up prinr 
cipally with the practice of the 
(moral) virtues. 

But even from the beginning the 
soul has started out on the way of 
meditation and mental prayer. At 
first the prayer was meditation, — 
much reasoning and reflection. But 
as time goes on, less attention is 
given to reason and reflection and 
more time is given to affections 
or acts of the will, acts of con- 
formity to the will of God, acts 
of humility, acts of the love of 
God. If the soul has been faithful 
to the practice of recollection and 
the practice of virtue, these acts 
become progressively less involved, 
less varied and less numerous. The 
soul comes to have an almost single 
disposition towards God. A dispo- 
sition that might be expressed as 
a consuming desire for God. 

When the soul has attained to 
this state of prayer, this is what 
happens : one's prayer slips out be- 
yond the bounds of the time of 



formal prayer and pervades the 
entire day. He has attained to the 
spirit of prayer, the spirit of rec- 
ollection. Needless to say, this is 
a matter of some years, not a mat- 
ter of months. 

From then on RECOLLECTION 
becomes the 'form' of one's whole 
spiritual life; his ordinary state of 
soul. (Aridities and difficulties 
come in, but we are by-passing 
them for the moment.) Recollec- 
tion is everything! a loving atten- 
tion to ... a great thirst for God ! 
Not that the soul ceases to prac- 
tice the virtues, — obedience, frater- 
nal charity, mortification, etc. It 
is more faithful than ever to the 
practice of virtue. But these acts 
of virtue require but little atten- 
tion, and often, but little effort. 
They follow as a natural conse- 
quence of one's prayer. But prayer, 
recollection is everything! One's 
whole spiritual life is a constant, 
earnest "going to God." God is 
everything ! the supreme attraction. 

If God so'wills, it is at this time 
that the soul receives what might 
be called the first graces of prayer. 
These graces consist, usually, in a 
great awareness of the presence of 
God in the soul, or an awareness of 
His working in the soul, or an a- 
wareness of the reality of His at- 
tributes, — an awareness that is 
distinctly different from anything 
that it has ever experienced before. 

These first graces of prayer have 
a deep effect on the soul. They 



make great detachment from crea- 
tures and worldly attractions very 
easy. They go far towards center- 
ing the soul upon God alone and 
increasing in the soul the real love 
of God. 

This is not to suggest that the 
special graces spoken of in the 
last two paragraphs are necessary 
at all, in order that they should 
reach high sanctity. According to 
some authorities (Sandreau, Garri- 
gou, Lagrange, de la Taille, S.J., 
Marechal, L. Peeters, S.J., de 
Jaegher, S.J., Joret, O.P., Arintero, 
O.P., Louismet, O.S.B.) these high- 
er graces are necessary and the nor- 
mal way for all. According to oth- 
ers, (Guibert, S.J., Garges, de Mau- 
migny, Poulain, S.J., Billot, S.J., 
Lejeune) these higher graces are 
merely a normal way, — the normal 
way for some. BUT they are ALL 
agreed that the normal way for 
ALL is the WAY OF PRAYER; 
that without a deep interior life 
of prayer and recollection one can- 
not attain to a great love for God. 

"There is only one road that 
reaches God," says St. Teresa of 
Avila, "and that is prayer; if any- 
one shows you another, you are 
being deceived." 

If this "way of prayer" is the 
normal course to Christian perfec- 
tion, — the inevitable way that 
every Christian must go, be he 
layman, priest or religious, — it is 
preeminently the way that God is 
calling us Passionists to walk. This 



37 



is clearly shown : a) from the 
words of our Holy Founder; b) 
from our rule itself; and c) from 
the whole organization of our life. 

We are probably all familiar with 
that quotation from our Holy 
Founder taken from his letter to 
a Canon of the church of Fras- 
cati, (L III, p. 417) : 'The Con- 
gregation, according to the light 
God mercifully vouchsafed to me, 
was established in a spirit of 
prayer, penance and true solitude. 
The Congregation rests upon that 
foundation ; remove it and the 
whole building must collapse as no 
longer resting on the vocation given 
to me by God." 

And we know how when dying, 
an old man of 81, in the presence 
of the Blessed Viaticum, he said : 
"I admonish the fathers ... to pre- 
serve in the Congregation the spir- 
it of prayer, the spirit of solitude, 
the spirit of poverty. If this spirit 
it preserved, the Congregation will 
shine as the sun in the sight of 
the Lord and before the nations 
and for all eternity." 

In his first regulations, he wrote: 
"Let the religious take care not 
only that they make prayer, but 
that they apply to it 'ex professo', 
giving it first place in their heart, 
for on prayer depends all good for 
them and through it the Lord di- 
rects them and infuses grace in 
them. All know that the principal 
and only design of the devil is to 
steal away from the hands of re- 



ligious this most powerful weapon 
of prayer that he may overcome 
them and cast them into the depths 
of tepidity. For this reason, under 
no pretext of color whatever should 
they dare to omit prayer. Let the 
Rector diligently watch over this 
matter especially, for the devil 
tries everything to hinder prayer; 
so let the superior use all care and 
look around even a hundred times, 
lest anyone omit it." Can any 
statement be more explicit or more 
emphatic? 

In his circular letter to the 
brethren for the feast of Pentecost, 
1750, our Father exhorted his re- 
ligious : "As dead to all things 
which are not God, remain in the 
most perfect detachment from all 
created things. . . . Direct all your 
zeal to this end : to be recollected 
in interior solitude, and then you 
will become true adorers of the 
Sovereign Good. . . ." 

One of the early Passionists at- 
tests in the Processes: (2,506,80) 
"In order to animate us to the 
practice of prayer, the servant of 
God was accustomed to tell us that 
all our religious, from the fact of 
professing an austere, retired and 
solitary life, are called to a very 
high prayer. I myself have heard 
him say this many times." 

One can hardly weigh even these 
few quotations of our Holy Found- 
er, (and we could give many 
more), without being convinced of 
the tremendous importance that he 



38 



attached to the exercise and the 
life of prayer. 

This same conviction becomes 
even more emphatic when we turn 
to our Holy Rules and Regulations. 
In the very first chapter of our 
Rule, prayer is mentioned inciden- 
tally, but as our PRIMARY END: 
"Since one of the chief objects of 
our Congregation is not only to de- 
vote ourselves to prayer, that we 
may be united to God by charity, 
but also to lead others to do the 
same . . ." etc . . . 

Consider, moreover, that besides 
the amount of time set aside for 
mental prayer, we are urged to 
"strive with all diligence to be rec- 
ollected in the presence of God 
during the day (Reg. 27) ; and es- 
pecially in the cell (Reg. 44) ; the 
choir (Reg. 9) ; in recreation (Reg. 
89); in the refectory (Rule 240)." 
Even in our traveling (and we 
Passionists spend a great deal of 
time in this way) we are to travel 
"with the mind as much as in us 
lies, fixed on God." (Rule 288). 
Surely all this supposes a state of 
recollection, a spirit of prayer. 

Our present regulations say, in 
regard to formal prayer, "Mental 
prayer is at once the strongest and 
most necessary prop which sustains 
religious orders in the church of 
God, and also the most important 
and efficacious means which the in- 
dividual religious can make use of, 
in order to advance in the way of 
virtue and evangelical perfection. 



It is difficult to employ stronger 
language than this to express the 
importance of prayer! 

Our former Fr. General, Titus 
of St. Paul, in his excellent analy- 
sis of the Rule and its spirit, says 
(Letter on the Second Centenary 
of Our Rule) : "Before all else, 
as regards prayer, we can say with- 
out exaggerating, that it consti- 
tutes the soul and substance of 
the whole Rule. To be indefatiga- 
ble in holy prayer, this is the pri- 
mary end that he (St. Paul of the 
Cross) assigns to the religious." 

By our vocation as Passionists 
we are called to high perfection . . . 
a life of prayer and union with 
God. The whole set up of our life 
— the time given to prayer, the ex- 
hortations to recollection, our soli- 
tude, our penance and poverty, our 
silence — all are admirably designed 
to lead us quickly to Christian per- 
fection, the ways of prayer, the 
ways of more intimate union with 
God. 

The very nature of our active 
work fits in admirably with this 
design : on our missions and re- 
treats we work earnestly and zeal- 
ously for souls; then we return to 
our solitude ; there is no distract- 
ing follow up. We are as completely 
detached from the place and the 
people among whom we worked, as 
if we had never been there. Such 
active work, if it is truly the spon- 
taneous overflow of our prayer life, 
far from being incompatible with 



39 



or interfering with our prayer life, 
will be a great help to it. 

On the other hand, the Passion- 
ist whose apostolate does not rest 
on a life of deep prayer, would be 
simply "sounding brass and a tink- 
ling cymbal." Such, certainly, was 
the conviction of our Holy Founder. 

Writing to a young rector who 
was working assiduously in prepar- 
ing himself for the missions, St. 
Paul wrote : "Study, yes ; but there 
is even greater need of a deep 
spirit of recollection, profound hu- 
mility and diffidence in self." This 
he was accustomed to write to 
many of his missionaries. 

Again he wrote: "To become a 
worthy apostolic minister, you must 
cultivate an interior life, keeping 
yourself from distracting occupa- 
tions and frequently, indeed if it is 
possible even a thousand times a 
day quickly placing yourself in the 
bosom of God through faith and 
love." (L. Ill, 146) Such quota- 
tions could be multiplied a dozen 
times. 

"One worker for the Gospel who 
has spurned earthly things and giv- 
en himself over to prayer and soli- 
tude will bring forth richer fruit 
than six hundred others who lack 
these virtues." (L. Ill, 418) 

In all this, of course, our Holy 
Founder is simply following the 
teachings of the saints and doctors 
of the church. St. Gregory the 
Great said, (I Reg.,l,III,ch.v,No. 



30) : "He who is acquainted with 
the examples of the saints or is 
versed in the knowledge of Holy 
Scripture, yet is not favored with 
the light of contemplation cannot 
be a perfect preacher. To possess 
fully the gift of preaching it is 
necessary to walk by humility in 
the footsteps of the saints, to dwell 
on the instructions in holy books, 
but above all, to take extreme care 
to arrive, by purity of heart, at 
contemplation, in order to learn 
from it what best to say." 

Not, of course, that we are to 
give ourselves to the contemplative 
life merely as a means to our ac- 
tive life of preaching. The object 
of the contemplative life, as St. 
Thomas says, is the perfect love 
of God. That should be the motive 
for giving ourselves to a life of 
prayer. Then from this life of 
prayer, one of its effects will be 
an overflow of some of this love 
for God into our active work of 
preaching, giving, as St. Thomas 
says, "something of that which is 
contemplated to others." 

Our conclusion is quite clear, 
quite inevitable. The way for us 
Passionists to come to the love of 
God is by a life of prayer. If our 
life is not a growing life of prayer 
and recollection, may we not sus- 
pect that our spiritual life is a 
stunted thing; that we have per- 
haps lost the way? 

Not that we will find sweetness 
in prayer every day. No. There 



40 



may be — there will be weeks at a 
time when we seem to derive but 
little profit from our prayer. We 
may seem to be doing little more 
than putting in time. But let us 
persevere, and know that that is 
the way that God is calling us 
Passionists to Himself. 

Obviously, it is up to the in- 
dividual to so live his life that it 
will be in accordance with his 
Passionist vocation. If some fail, 
the reason is not to be found in 
this, that the active work is in- 



compatible with the contemplative 
life. Our Rule calls for action. The 
failure is that such a one has not 
first gained the contemplative spir- 
it, the spirit of prayer; or, having 
had it, fails to preserve it.. A 
first obligation of our vocation, 
therefore, is to strive to dispose 
ourselves for a spirit of prayer, to 
avoid the things that hinder its 
success and progress, and above all, 
to seek God earnestly through the 
persevering practice of prayer and 
recollection. 




Mr. Michael Possenti, brother of St. 
Gabriel, the physician, who in his later 
days would send his patients to his saintly 
Brother with their ills. 



41 



Master of Novices 



PASSIONIST CUSTOMS 

Summary: I. Re'at.ions with the local Superior. II. Correspondence. III. When to celebrate 
Mass. IV. Relations with the community. V. The culpa of the novices. VI. Confession of 
novices. VII. The novices and mental prayer. VIII. The duties of the Vice-Master. 



I. The Master of Novices ranks 
in dignity with the Superiors of 
our Congregation, but he has no 
jurisdiction whatever over the pro- 
fessed religious. Only in the ab- 
sence of all Superiors or for some 
urgent necessity would his position 
allow him to issue an order or 
grant a permission to a professed 
religious. In matters directly per- 
taining to himself the Master is 
under the authority of the local 
Superior, just as much as the other 
religious. Though he is completely 
in charge of the training and spir- 
itual direction of the novices, he 
must comply in all things with the 
Superior's orders regarding food, 
clothing, lodging, and the regular 
observance. It is extremely impor- 
tant, then, that the Rector and the 
Master keep in their proper spheres 
of action and always maintain com- 
plete harmony for the welfare of 
the novitiate and the entire re- 
ligious community. 

II. The Master of novices enjoys 
the title of Very Reverend and the 
privilege of a private key for his 
cell and desk. Any mail addressed 
to Father Master or the novices 
must be delivered to him unopened. 
The Rector supplies him with sta- 
tionery and stamps, though the 



higher Superiors may allow him to 
procure such items for himself. 
Father General or Father Provin- 
cial ordinarily allows the Master to 
use his weekly free-mass stipend 
and also any small donations from 
other sources ; however, such sums 
must be kept within the limits set 
by the Superiors; Furthermore, the 
Master may not appropriate any 
money paid him for performing 
ministerial duties ; such sums must 
be given to his Rector. The funds 
allowed the Master of novices must 
be used for any little items neces- 
sary or useful to the novitiate, and 
employed with the same care and 
caution required of a Director of 
students. 

III. Father Master usually cele- 
brates Mass during the first half- 
hour of prayer that he may finish 
his thanksgiving in time for the 
novices' chapter. If at all possible, 
he should say Mass either in choir 
or at some altar where the novices 
may attend by themselves. Here 
the Master should notice how they 
conduct themselves and how de- 
voutly they serve Mass. Unless 
other arrangements have been 
made, the cleric novices should at- 
tend and serve the Superior's Mass 
on feast-days. In distributing man- 



42 



ual offices to the novices Father 
Master ought, of course, to take 
into consideration the recommenda- 
tions of Father Rector. Under no 
circumstances, however, must the 
novices be assigned to places where 
they may associate with seculars 
or the professed religious. In train- 
ing the novices Father Master re- 
serves for himself whatever per- 
tains to their spiritual direction, 
novitiate life, and discipline, but 
without relaxing his vigilance in 
any way, he delegates to Father 
Vice-Master the charge of their 
exterior training. 

IV. Father Master makes culpa 
in the refectory only to the Rector, 
or in his absence, only to the higher 
Superiors. If Father Vicar should 
ever happen to hold the Friday 
Chapter during the Rector's ab- 
sence, the Master leaves the choir, 
but Father Vice-Master remains 
with the novices. On Fridays and 
the vigils of feast-days he does 
not ask the Vicar for a mortification 
in the refectory, but he performs 
what is given to all. When no 
Superiors are present in the re- 
fectory the Master may receive the 
culpa of the professed religious, 
but he is not to correct them nor 
impose extraordinary penances. 
When the Vicar delivers the eve- 
ning sentiment in the absence of 
the Rector, Father Master does not 
attend ; but if the Vicar is away 
too and no other higher Superior 
is present, then the Master im- 



parts his blessing to the brethren. 
If Father Master should ever hap- 
pen to be temporary Superior, he 
should give the evening sentiment 
with a certain reserve about giv- 
ing any orders or making any ar- 
rangements. 

V. Besides receiving the culpa 
of the novices the Master corrects 
their public reading in the refec- 
tory and choir. Only in the absence 
of all Superiors, including the 
Vicar, does it appertain to Father 
Master to ring the little bell at 
meals. On Fridays and the vigils 
of feasts he imposes a special mor- 
tification on the novices, either col- 
lectively or individually, after the 
local Superior has given one to 
the professed. While he makes cul- 
pa, the novices stand until the 
Superior imposes the mortification. 
They also rise whenever the Master 
enters or leaves the refectory dur- 
ing the course of the meal — pro- 
vided that Father General or Fa- 
ther Provincial be not there. 

VI. It is Father Master's duty 
to assign names to the novices, to 
designate their cells and the books 
they are to read, and to arrange 
the distribution of their time; he 
also assigns their manual offices, 
changes or imposes other duties, 
prescribes for each a companion 
and a place in choir. All permis- 
sions, exemptions and penances 
must have his approval, and he 
holds all spiritual conferences with 
the novices. In short Father Mas- 



43 



ter cares for anything that per- 
tains to the efficient administra- 
tion of the novitiate. In his ar- 
rangement of affairs the Master 
must try to preserve a proper un- 
derstanding with the Vice-Master, 
that all may proceed harmoniously 
and any disagreement, which might 
disedify the novices, may be elim- 
inated. Canon 891 forbids the Mas- 
ter or Vice-Master from being the 
usual confessor of the novices, but 
in cases of particular seriousness 
this permission is allowed — pro- 
vided the novice asks it of his own 
accord. Of necessity, then, Father 
General or Father Provincial must 
assign one or more ordinary con- 
fessors for the novices, besides des- 
ignating an extraordinary confes- 
sor at least four times a year. 
Usually it is considered more pru- 
dent for a Master not to notice 
(in fact, to approve of) a novice's 
having spiritual conferences with 
the Vice-Master, especially if no 
evil results from it. 

VII. The Master and Vice-Mas- 
ter must work hand-in-hand in 
training and instructing the nov- 
ices. Ordinarily the Master re- 
serves for himself the Chapter on 
prayer, all spiritual direction, the 
explanation of our Holy Rule and 
Regulations, and one of the daily 
classes. Father Vice-Master holds 
Chapter once or twice a week, in- 
structs the novices in catechism on 
days designated by the Master, 
trains them in the rubrics of the 
Mass and other liturgical ceremo- 
44 



nies, and teaches them how to ful- 
fill the daily acts of the regular 
observance properly. He should al- 
so see to it that their breakfast 
is prepared, that they are instructed 
how to do their manual offices and 
that they do them that way. The 
Vice-Master conducts one of the 
daily classes, and accompanies the 
novices while they recite the ro- 
sary after Vespers and while they 
are on walk before Compline. It 
is his duty to instruct them in their 
manners, neatness, and religious 
modesty. He should likewise con- 
cern himself with procuring any 
clothes the novices may need or 
whatever they need for their cells 
and offices. Finally, Father Vice- 
Master should make all the neces- 
sary preparations at the time of 
vestition and profession. 

VIII. Father Vice-Master is sub- 
ordinate to the Master of novices 
in everything that regards the no- 
vitiate, and he should issue orders 
and make changes only with the 
advice and permission of Father 
Master. Occasionally he may im- 
pose some slight penance on the 
novices, but nothing serious. In 
the absence of Father Master the 
Vice-Master receives the culpa of 
the novices in the refectory and 
corrects their public reading. If 
the Master is away from the re- 
treat, the Vice-Master takes his 
place, but prudently avoids any- 
thing that would militate against 
the arrangements of the Master of 
novices. 



Obituary Notices 19 Ul 




Followers of the Crucified 

VIII. 
Brother Marcellus of St. Anne 

Brother Marcel'us of St. Anne (Pietro Adolfo Vannucci) of the Province of the 
Presentation, died at the Rct.reat of the Presentation, on Monte Argentaro (Groseeto) on the 
30th of March, 1941, in the 89th year of lie. and the 6rith of his profession. 



DROTHER MARCELLUS was 
the dean of the Brothers of 
the Congregation ; for several years 
he was infirm, but his strong phy- 
sique and the loving assistance of 
the brother infirmarian lengthened 
his earthly existence. 

The vocation of Bro. Marcellus 
must be attributed to the good ex- 
ample given by our questing broth- 
ers, whom he so admired in his 
countryside home of Matraia, near 
Lucca, a country eminently Catho- 
lic and which has given to our 
congregation many good religious. 
He entered the Novitiate at the 
Retreat of The Angel at the age 
of 22, was vested in the holy habit, 
and exchanged the name of Pietro 
Adolfo Vannucci for that of Bro. 



Marcellus of St. Anne. The fervent 
novice passed the year of trial in 
a praiseworthy manner, and by 
unanimous vote he was admitted 
to profession on July 28, 1875. 

From the Retreat of The Angel, 
he was sent to that of St. Angelo 
on Mt. Fogliano and with the re- 
ligious who were expelled shortly 
afterward, he fled to Ronciglione. 
Later he went to the Retreat of 
the Presentation on Monte Argen- 
taro, where he lived his long life 
as a Passionist Brother with truly 
edifying piety. 

Endowed with great aptitude for 
manual labor, it can be said that 
he exercised all the trades, and with 
much competence: for he was, ac- 
cording as circumstance demanded, 



45 



plumber, carpenter, mason, tinner, 
saddle-maker, shoemaker, wagoner, 
and a cooper. There was no burden 
from which he excused himself. 
The Superior made use of him to 
the great material advantage of the 
Retreat, especially through the 
quest, in which he spent himself 
with diligence in the nearby Marsh- 
es and on the Isle of Elba, where 
he was well known and esteemed 
and loved. But the offices which he 
performed for the longest time with 
a great spirit of sacrifice and fra- 
ternal charity, were those of baker 
and poulterer. 

The noble program of the great 
Patriarch of Monks of the west, 
ova et labora was fully realized by 
our Brother Marcellus ; for him 
never did an instant pass without 
prayer or manual labor. The writer, 
who knew him for many years, can 
in all truth say that except for the 
hours spent in the choir or in rec- 
reation, never did he see him sit- 
ting down. 

He was always present at the 
acts of the observance, and most 
exact in all the duties of the good 
Passionist Brother. For him the 
Rule was most holy, and when he 
spoke of it, it was with profound 
devotion and reverence. Of a lively 
and deep faith, he sought every 
opportunity to visit the Blessed 
Sacrament ; and it was a wonderful 
sight to see this holy old man, 
almost hidden, in a corner of the 
church, propped up as best he could, 



who because he was ailing, occu- 
pied himself many hours of the day 
and often during the night ador- 
ing the Blessed Sacrament. 

He always had the greatest re- 
spect for his Superiors, and never 
took it upon himself to do anything 
without their permission. During 
his last years, although he was un- 
able to move by himself, he made 
the Stations daily either in the 
church or in choir, accompanied by 
the infirmarian. He always wanted 
to be present with the community 
and although he was half-deaf, he 
wanted to hear all the exhortations 
given by the superiors, in short, 
we can surely believe that the days 
of his mortal career were virtuous 
and meritorious and that our Holy 
Founder recognized him as a wor- 
thy follower. 

The infirmity which accompanies 
old age was the cause of his death, 
not disease. In the last year his 
life was often despaired of, so that 
he received Viaticum several times. 
Finally on the evening of the 30th 
of March, with all the religious 
about his bed, after being com- 
forted by the holy sacraments, the 
blessing and the prayers for the 
dying, he died peacefully. Now he 
reposes in peace in our cemetery 
on Monte Argentaro, together with 
our other brethren, awaiting the 
resurrection of the just. May the 
Lord send us many brothers with 
the spirit and the virtue of Brother 
Marcellus. 



46 




ACTA CONGREGATIONS 

(Partial Resume of September 1948 issue) 



The "Osservatore Romano" in its 
July 2nd issue, announced that His 
Holiness Pope Pius XII nominated 
His Excellency, the Most Reverend 
Archbishop Leo Peter Kierkel, C.P., 
Apostolic Internuntio at Delhi, India. 
Address: Apostolic Internuntiature, 8 
Alipurr Rd., New Delhi, India.) 



9th, 1948) Prelature Nullius in Moyo- 
bamba, San Martin, Peru, was con- 
fided to the Spanish Passionist Fa- 
thers in view of the zealous work in 
that territory during the past years. 



The Apostolic Constitution by which 
the Holy Father accurately and clear- 
ly denned the "matter and form" for 
the Orders of Diaconate, Priesthood 
and the Episcopate is given in full. 

An excerpt of the Motu Proprio is 
given in which the same faculties for 
administrating the Sacrament of 
Penance are given as the Codex Iuris 
Canonici gives to those traveling on 
the sea. 

A letter from the Sacred Congrega- 
tion of Extraordinary Ecclesiastical 
Affairs to Most Reverend Father 
General announces that the new (May 



The Sacred Apostolic Penetentiary, 
in answer to a request made by our 
Very Reverend Father Procurator, 
grants a plenary Indulgence to all 
members of the Congregation when 
reciting the Act of Consecration of 
our Congregation to the Immaculate 
Heart of Mary for the first time and 
on the anniversary, under the usual 
conditions. Also a plenary indulgence 
every month after having devoutly re- 
cited it daily. A partial Indulgence of 
500 days every time the "Act" is re- 
cited with a contrite heart. This 
grant was given for seven years. 



The same Sacred Penitentiary 
again conceded the special faculties 



47 



(vide COLLECTIO FACULTATUM 
C.P. p. 215 et seqq.) to our Most 
Reverend Father General with the 
power as before of subdelegating. The 
grant was dated June 12th, 1948 and 
was given for three years. Most 
Reverend Father Malcolm, Vice 
General, communicated these faculties 
to the General Consultors, the Procu- 
rator, the General Secretary; to all 
Provincials and their Consultors; to 
all Rectors and Missionaries; to all 
Fathers of the Congregation who 
have enjoyed these faculties before. 



NOTA BENE : Number VIII of these 
faculties has been corrected to the 
effect that when using this faculty to 
dispense from the irregularity "ex 
homicidio voluntario aut abortu" re- 
course must be had to the Sacred 
Penitentiary within a month, at least 
by mail, by either the penitent him- 
self or the Confessor. Also the de- 
cision of the Sacred Tribunal must be 
followed, and both recourse and abid- 
ing by decision are under pain of sus- 
pensio a divinis ipso facto incurrenda. 



GENERAL CURIA 



In accordance with Canon 587 and 
Decree 23 of the Thirty-fifth General 
Chapter of our Congregation, the 
General Curia, in a meeting of March 
30th, 1948, decided that in each Pro- 
vince two Retreats be designated as 
houses of formal study: one for Phi- 
losophy, the other for Theology. These 
houses are to be designated by the re- 
spective Provincial Chapter and once 
having been designated cannot be 
changed without the consent of the 
Most Reverend Father General. In 
Provinces where the Provincial Chap- 
ter has been held, the designation of 
said houses devolves upon the Pro- 
vincial Curia and its decision is to be 
approved by the General Curia. 



Since the death of Very Reverend 
Father Martin of the Holy Family 
left the office of fourth General Con- 
suitor vacant, the General Curia, ac- 
cording to number 254 of Holy Rule, 
met June 17th, 1948 to elect a new 
General Consultor. By secret ballot 
Father General and the General Con- 



sultors with Father Procurator unani- 
mously elected on the first ballot the 
Very Reverend Father Vincent of the 
Sorrowful Mother, Rector of the Re- 
treat of St. Catharine in Wavre, Pro- 
vince of St. Gabriel, Holland. Fr. 
General, who was absent from Rome, 
sent his ballot by mail — vide n. 53 of 
Collectio Facultatum C.P. 



In the same meeting of the General 
Curia, June 17th, in harmony with 
Decree 12 of the Thirty-fifth General 
Chapter, a new Curia for the Vice- 
Province of Germany and Austria was 
elected for one year, by secret ballot. 
By unanimous vote the Very Reverend 
Father Walter of the Sorrowful 
Mother was elected Vice-Provincial; 
his First Counselor, Very Rev. Fr. 
Paul of the Passion; the second 
Counselor, Very Rev. Fr. Victor of St. 
Nicholas. 



In two letters, dated April 5th, 
1948, Most Reverend Father General 
requested the Very Reverend Father 



48 



Giles of the Sacred Hearts, Postulator 
General of our Congregation, to in- 
troduce and supervise the processes of 
beatification of several of our Breth- 
ren who have died in the fame of 
sanctity, namely: 1) The Servant of 
God, Father Joseph of Jesus and 
Mary, of the Province of Mater Do- 
lorosa; 2) The Servant of God, Fa- 
ther Innocent of the Immaculata, who 
was martyred in Turon, Spain, with 
eight Christian Brothers, member of 
the Precious Blood Province; 3) the 
Twenty Six Servants of God, Fathers, 
Students and Brothers of the Retreat 
of S. Cristo de la Luz, Damiel, Spain, 
Province of the Holy Family, mar- 
tyred in 1936. 



GENERAL POSTULATION 

The Office of the Postulator an- 
nounces with great joy that the Cause 
of Bl. Vincent Mary Strambi, C.P. has 
been taken up again and asks the 
prayers of all the Brethren that noth- 
ing will impede the probable Canoni- 
zation in the Jubilee Year of 1950. 



Looking over the list of offerings to 
promote the beatification and canoni- 
zation of our Saintly Brethren, all 
save one (from Brazil) were received 
from Curias and Retreats in Italy. 
The offerings that were made with a 
special purpose were all in favor of 
the cause of Fr. Bernard Mary, C.P. 



STS. JOHN AND PAUL 



Sunday, October 17, 1948, marked 
the formal opening of the new wing 
for our University Students. This 
new wing has been under construction 
since early spring (cf. Vol. I, N. 2 of 
The Passionist). It has been built to 
the right of the entrance, along the 
Via di S. Paolo della Croce. On the 
ground floor are new parlors, a small 
but growing library for the Universi- 
tarians, and other public offices. The 
second floor is reserved for the 
General Curia — with ample room for 
cells, offices, archives etc. The third 
floor contains the rooms for the Uni- 
versity Students — with well-equipped 
wash-room facilities. 

This year is noteworthy also for the 
large number of university students 
here at Sts. John and Paul. Alto- 
gether there are 32 Passionists doing 
post-graduate work in Rome. And 
once again almost every part of the 



world is represented — with eleven 
from the Italian Provinces, ten from 
the Spanish provinces, three from the 
English province, three from the Irish 
province, two Australians, two Ameri- 
cans, and one Hollander. The two 
from America are Fr. Justin of the 
Eastern Province, who is studying 
Church Music, and Fr. Roger of our 
Province, who is working in Sacred 
Scripture. 

Many of the educational institutes 
here at Rome have Passionists en- 
rolled among their students — includ- 
ing the Angelicum, the Gregorianum, 
the Lateran, the Biblicum, the Pon- 
tifical Institute of Music, and the Va- 
tican Library. Great diversity is 
found also among the subjects being 
studied; philosophy, theology, canon 
law, Sacred Scripture, history, jour- 
nalism, music, and library science. 

The Passionist wishes to express its 



49 




University Students at Sts. John and Paul, at the dedication of the new 
wing. Seated, from right to left: V. Rev. Fr. Alfred, Procurator 
General; V. Rev. Fr. Vincent, 4th General Consultor; V. Rev. Fr. Mal- 
colm, 1st General Consultor; V. Rev. Fr. John Mary, 3rd General Con- 
sultor, and Director of the Universitarians; V. Rev. Fr. Fidelis, Rector, 
and Rev. Fr. Stanislaus, Vice-Prefect of Studies, and assistant Director 
of the Universitarians. 



hope that world conditions will con- 
tinue to permit the students from all 
over the world to use this new wing 
at Sts. John and Paul's, erected by the 
foresight and with the generosity of 
Most Rev. Fr. General and his Curia. 



May 21st, 1948, Solemn Funeral 
Services were held in Sts. John and 



Paul Basilica for the deceased Father 
Martin of the Holy Family, Fourth 
General Consultor. The church was 
drapped in mourning. Many of the 
faithful, besides the Major Superiors 
of quite a few Orders and Congrega- 
tions, assisted. News of his tragic 
death was relayed to our General 
Curia, May 16th, 1948, by the Secre- 
tariate of State of His holiness. 



PROVINCIAL CURIA 



The following have been appointed 
to give the Community Retreats this 
year. Cincinnati, January 2-9, Fr. 
Matthias; Detroit, January 2-9, Fr. 
Kenneth; Sierra Madre, January 2-9, 
Fr. Roland; Sacramento, January 16- 
20, Fr. Roland; Normandy (Fathers 



and Brothers), January 30-February 
3 and Louisville, February 6-13, Fr. 
Felix Hackett; Chicago, Feb. 20-27, 
Fr. Felix Hackett; Des Moines, Feb- 
ruary 6-13, Fr. Berchmans Lanagan; 
St. Paul, February 22-March 1, Fr. 
Berchmans Lanagan ; Birmingham, 



50 



February 6-10, Fr. Daniel; Houston, 
February 20-24, Fr. Daniel. 



Because of conditions in North 
China our Fathers left Peiping on 
November 5th and the language- 
school there was closed. About a week 
later a message was received in 
Shanghai from Bishop Cuthbert and 
Father Provincial Gabriel that the 
eight young Fathers who had recent- 
ly left the States should return home. 
This was the only logical and prudent 
step under the circumstances, es- 
pecially when we consider their lack 
of knowledge of the Chinese language, 
their lack of experience, and the 
danger of a crisis in Hunan in the 
near future. On account of the para- 
lyzing strike along our Pacific coast 
it seemed that the only possible man- 
ner of travel was by air. In conse- 
quence of this our Fathers Carl and 
Paul were back home for Thanks- 
giving day. Later, however, Frs. 
Thomas, Hilarion and Justinian suc- 
ceeded in getting back on the Evacua- 
tion Ship "Republic." December 5th, 
the Provincial Curia received a cable 
to the effect that Frs. James Lambert, 
Ernest Cunningham, Michael Camp- 
bell, Leo Bernard, Linus McSheffrey, 



Aloysius O'Malley, and Wendelin 
Moore were aboard the Evacuation 
Ship "Anderson". From other sources 
it was learned that Fr. Provincial 
Gabriel would be back in the States 
December 10th. 

The whole thing adds up to a dis- 
tressing picture. The future of mis- 
sionary work in China, as far as hu- 
man eyes can see, is definitely sty- 
mied. Fr. Cyprian Frank, who spent 
many years in China, thinks it will be 
a good seven years before work can be 
taken up again in China. The Church 
in that country is suffering by a 
special plan of Providence for the best 
of the Chinese people. After having 
tasted Communism for a few years, 
they will be very receptive to the doc- 
trines and blessings of the Catholic 
Faith. We hope and pray that this 
mental picture of Fr. Cyprian be true. 

All this is in sharp contrast to the 
joy that must have prevailed among 
our Chinese Missioners on the Feast 
of Christ the King when the Most 
Reverend Bishop Cuthbert ordained 
Rev. John Felix Nien to the Holy 
Priesthood in St. Augustine's Cathe- 
dral, Yuanling, Hunan, China. Fa- 
ther Nien is the first Native priest of 
the Passionist Chinese Mission. 



MATER DOLOROSA PROVINCE 



(Naples) 



The Preparatory Seminary at Calvi 
Risorta is still struggling to efface the 
damage of war and to make accomo- 
dations for budding vocations to the 
Congregation. Five thousand lire will 
buy a bed for a "Prep Student". 
Thus we read in the "L'Araldo del 
Crocifisso". The same periodical 
gives us a picture of the missionary 



work of the Province: In 1945 thirty- 
three missions were given by our Fa- 
thers; in 1946, sixty-eight; in 1947, 
forty-two; in 1948, fifty-three. Fa- 
thers of the Province working in 
foreign fields also have a page in the 
"L'Araldo". 

Probably the greatest joy for the 
Province within the past months was 



51 



occasioned by a letter from Most 
Reverend Father General in which 
His Paternity acceeded to the request 
of the Capitular Fathers to open the 
informative Processes about the life 
and virtues of the Servant of God, 
Father Joseph of Jesus and Mary, 
C.P., a member of the Province who 
died in the odor of sanctity, January 
12th, 1929. Father Joseph was born 
in 1853 in the village of Filettino, 
South Latium, Italy. He entered the 
Congregation in 1877 and therein per- 



fected the life of virtue begun under 
the care of his good parents. Soon 
after his ordination he was appointed 
Lector, which office he held for ten 
years. In the course of his life he 
also held the Offices of Rector, Master 
of Novices, Provincial Consultor and 
for eight years Provincial. His fame 
as a holy man during his life time in- 
creased after his death so that now 
many are awaiting the official decision 
of the Church to give him the honors 
of the altar. Quod Faxit Deus. 



THE PROVINCE OF ST. PAUL OF THE CROSS 

(East United States) 



The alarming news from China's 
civil war and the obvious success of 
the Reds in pushing further and fur- 
ther south suggests the gloomy pros- 
pect that all China may be in the 
hands of the Communists in the not 
very distant future. Our missionaries 
were not slow to re-act to the immi- 
nent peril. Several weeks ago a joint 
cablegram was received in Union City 
from Bishop O'Gara and the Pro- 
vincial of our province, bringing the 
news that the nine priests who were 
living at our language school in 
Peiping had to flee to Shanghai. It 
was further reported that they were 
advised by the American Consul in 
Shanghai to get out of China alto- 
gether. However a different expedient 
was under consideration for a while. 
It was thought possible to send these 
nine priests to our various missions 
in China but the plan was later aban- 
doned as impracticable. The result 
was that eight of these priests were 
ordered to return home. Two of the 
western Fathers arrived back home at 
western airports and three from the 



East arrived safe at La Guardia field 
on Monday, November 11th. The 
other three Fathers will soon follow 




Fr. Anthony Maloney, C.P., who cele- 
brated his Silver Jubilee in China. 



52 



them. It is hoped that in due time 
these Fathers may be able to return 
to their post in China. In the mean- 
time plans are under consideration to 
have them continue their study of the 
Chinese language here at home. The 
reopening of our house of studies in 
Washington is now under considera- 
tion. 

On Nov. 11th our community of St. 
Michael's, Union City, N. J., received 
with joyful enthusiasm the pilgrim 
statue of Our Lady of Fatima. It 
was brought there from Englewood, 
N. J. where services had been held in 
honor of Our Lady in the church of 
the Carmelite Fathers. The statue 
was accompanied by Msgr. McGrath 
of the Scarborough Foreign Mission 
Society of Canada. The statue was 
met at the church door at 8:00 P.M. 
by the entire religious community and 
a large gathering of the parish Holy 
Name Society. It was escorted in pro- 
cession to the sanctuary and there en- 
throned amid a sumptuous bank of 
flowers. To the capacity congregation 
of the faithful, Msgr. McGrath de- 
livered a beautiful sermon on his 
chosen theme, the compassion of Our 
Lady. After the sermon solemn bene- 
diction was imparted and there was 
veneration of the statue by the people. 

On the following three days there 
were continuous services in honor of 
Our Lady of Fatima. On Friday and 
Saturday morning a solemn high mass 
was celebrated and this was followed 
by a sermon, the recitation of the 
rosary and an act of consecration to 
Our Blessed Lady. Every hour on 
the hour for the rest of the day until 
evening there was a special service, 



which consisted of sermon, rosary and 
act of consecration. The evening ser- 
vice at 8:00 o'clock concluded with 
solemn benediction. On Sunday, May 
14th, the last day of the public devo- 
tions solemn high mass was celebrated 
at 11:00 o'clock. For the rest of the 
day, from 2:00 P.M. on, hourly ser- 
vices were held at the solemn closing 
of the triduum there was solemn 
benediction and a sermon by Msgr. 
McGrath. 



On Monday, Nov. 15th, the religious 
community held a special private de- 
votion in honor of Our Lady of Fa- 
tima. In the forenoon of that day the 
statue was carried in procession 
through the whole house, including 
the novitiate, the entire community 
participating and reciting the Rosary. 
This devotion was offered to Our Lady 
of Fatima as a special act of thanks- 
giving for all the graces and blessings 
that had been bestowed during the 
three days' devotion held in her honor. 
The statue was enthroned in our choir 
until later that day when it continued 
on its journey, it being then removed 
to Jersey City. 

Immediately after this procession of 
thanksgiving there came to the Rec- 
tor word of a temporal blessing, 
which seemed like a special farewell 
favor on the part of the Queen of 
Heaven. The first telephone call the 
Rector answered on returning to his 
room after the service brought the in- 
formation that the city had lifted 
from the monastery a heavy burden 
of taxation which had been payed for 
many years and many efforts to ob- 
tain redress had been made without 
success. No wonder that in the cir- 



53 



cumstances it is believed that Our 
Lady of Fatima herself took care of 
the matter as a mark of her special 
favor and benediction. 



The Acta Congregationis (Septem- 
ber 1948) takes cognizance of the 33rd 
anniversary of "America's Passion 
Play"— Veronica's Veil— in St. Jo- 
seph's Parish, Union City, N.J., under 
the auspices of the Fathers of St. 
Paul of the Cross Province. Present 
Pastor in St. Joseph's is Father 
Benjamin, C.P. 



In our November issue of THE 
PASSIONIST we were happy to give 
an account of the dedication cere- 
monies of the new Church in Mother 



of Mercy Mission, Washington, N. C. 
We are happy to present our readers 
with a picture of it. It is a grand 
tribute to the zeal of Fr. John Joseph. 
Since then our attention has been 
called to the twenty-years' noble work 
of his twin-brother, Fr. Julian, C.P., 
also among the colored in St. Joseph 
Mission, New Bern, N.C. In 1928 Fa- 
ther started to work at the mission 
with "oldshacks, wild children, help- 
less Sisters and twelve dollars". In 
spite of a disasterous fire in 1943 St. 
Joseph's Mission now has 250 instead 
of 12 members, a model plant, in- 
cluding an accredited High School 
and things running smoothly, as 
things run in that kind of work. We 
hope and pray that Father will be 




Our Lady of Mercy Mission, 
September 24, 1948. 



Washington, North Carolina, dedicated 



able to continue at his post for many 
a year to come, in spite of his some- 
what impaired health. 



Fifty-nine officers and men of the 
U.S. Airforce lately made a retreat 
in the Jamaica Monastery Retreat 
House. The soldiers were flown to 
L.I. as on training flights and during 
the retreat were considered on tempo- 
rary duty. An arrangement has been 
made so that every man in the Air 
Force is entitled to spend three days 
a year in any retreat-house of his 



choice and during those three days be 
considered on duty. This Air Force 
Retreat Movement is considered as a 
part of the character guidance pro- 
gram. The Retreat in Jamaica seems 
to have been the first one under this 
arrangement. Men were flown to 
Jamaica from Ohio, Virginia, Wash- 
ington, D.C., etc. During the retreat 
the men were televised by station 
WPIX as they made a public act of 
consecration to the Immaculate heart 
of Mary in front of the grotto in the 
monastery garden. 



PROVINCE OF ST. MICHAEL 



(France) 



For various reasons, the principal 
being greater facility in vocational re- 
cruiting, our Preparatory School of 
Merignac (Gironde), more or less dis- 
banded during the last years of the 
war, had been transferred temporarily 
to Melay (Vendee). It has been now 
reopened twenty km. from Melay, in 
the diocese of Angers, at Longeron. 

It was on the feast of St. Michael 
that the new house of studies, placed 
under the patronage of our Lady of 
Holy Hope, was blessed. A goodly 
number of religious from Melay were 
able to take part in the ceremony, 
thanks to the kindness of one of our 
benefactors who had them brought 
there that morning. Very Reverend 
Father Dominic, Provincial, proceeded 
to bless the chapel and the different 
quarters. Immediately afterwards, 
the solemn Mass began. Very Rever- 
end Father Provincial was assisted 
by Very Reverend Father Paul 
Joseph, first Consultor and Superior 
of the new Community, and by Rev- 
erend Father Michael, former Su- 



perior of the Preparatory School at 
Merignac. After the gospel, Very 
Reverend Father Provincial addressed 
the gathering, calling upon those pre- 
sent to recognize once more the good- 
ness and providence of God in a way 
that certain difficulties were able to 
settle themselves, which were at times 
seemingly unextricable. Repeating 
again once more the great confidence 
of all, Father Provincial said: Is not 
our patroness our Mother, the Mother 
of Holy Hope? After Mass, all voices 
united in singing the Te Deum. 

At the breakfast which followed, be- 
sides the Religious, there were present 
also the Pastor of the parish and his 
Assistant, and several benefactors. 
Very Reverend Father Provincial 
wished to express his gratitude to 
God, to the most Blessed Virgin, and 
to His Excellency the Bishop of An- 
gers whose life-long interest in our 
Congregation was manifested in a 
very fatherly way by our admission 
into his lovely diocese; to the clergy 
present, and to all our benefactors, to 



all, too small in number, who were 
able to respond to the invitation, to 
those also who were not able to be 
present, and everyone who, in one way 
or another, helped in the realization of 
this new work for the glory of Jesus 
Crucified. 

The location and environment of the 
new Preparatory School are as fol- 
lows: Situated on the banks of the 
Sevre, at the extreme south-west of 
Maine and the Loire, to the borders of 
Vendee, from the lower Loire and the 
Two Sevres, in the midst of a people 
profoundly christian and sympathetic, 
this property offers, along with the 
solitude befitting our religious life, an 
ensemble of those qualities which cor- 
respond very well with its purpose. 
With much strenuous labor during re- 



cent weeks, the ground work was far 
enough in advance to permit comfor- 
table occupation.. 

It is narrated in the life of St. Paul 
of the Cross that when the first house 
of the Congregation was being built, 
Saint Michael, by a sudden appari- 
tion, put to flight men who had de- 
termined to destroy from top to bot- 
tom the work undertaken. For those 
who are cognisant with the vicissi- 
tudes, trials and difficulties of all sorts 
through which the French Province 
of St. Michael has passed for well 
nigh a century, this new foundation 
is a new and manifest proof of the 
efficacious protection of its glorious 
patron. 

"Champblanc" is the name of the 
new property. Its origin is unknown. 







■■' 



Champblanc, the new Preparatory Seminary of St, Michael Province, France, 
56 



It: 



St. Martha's Retreat, Bethany. Lelt to right: Fr. Barnabas, the late Superior 
Fr. Bonaventure, Fr. Albert, Fr. John, and their brother and family, Fr. 
Euthyme, and Bro. Michael. 



Who knows but that it is one of those 
providential names whose significance 
becomes clearer only with time. 
Champblanc! as though one were to 
say "New Land" where the seed made 
fertile by the sacrifices of long years, 
by the hopes which, despite all, de- 
termined to hold fast and hang on, 
by countless prayers (for God knows 
how much we have prayed), shall at 
last rise up and bring forth abun- 
dant and lasting fruit. Champblanc! 



as though one were to say "Page 
Blanche", at the heading of our Lady 
of Holy Hope, under the seal of the 
Holy Archangel Michael, under whose 
patronage so high and powerful shall 
be inscribed great combats for the 
reign of Jesus Crucified. 

May our Father St. Paul of the 
Cross deign to bless our enterprise, 
and grant that his children may ever 
serve with fervor the Divine King of 
the Cross and his Afflicted Mother. 



PALESTINE 



The death of Fr. Bonaventure, as 
we see it with our natural insight, 
was a hard blow to the Bethany Re- 
treat and also to its sole Passionist 
inhabitant, Fr. Albert. Within six 
months the Retreat lost two of its 
mainstays, first Father John, shot by 
a Zionist, May 19th, and now Fr. 
Bonaventure. We sincerely offer our 



sympathies to Fr. Albert on the loss 
of his own brother and now of his 
Superior. Since 1936, and even be- 
fore, Fr. Bonaventure was a most 
strong prop, morally and materially, 
for the Palestine Retreat. 

In a letter dated November 30th, 
Fr. Albert writes that things are a bit 
quiet now, but a person can never tell 



57 



what the next day will bring. Up to 
that date Bethany was still unharmed, 
thank God. 

But general conditions in Palestine 
are most deplorable. The refugees in 
Jerusalem are absolutely destitute, 
sleeping under trees, without food, 
without clothing, without blankets 
etc., and quite a percentage of these 
individuals formerly lived in compara- 
tive opulance. Father Albert BEGS 
for gifts, e.g., clothing, to enable him 



to help his fellow-countrymen. It is 
heartrending for him to see men and 
women in such circumstances and not 
be able to assist them. Letters and 
packages can be sent to Fr. Albert 
with the following address : Fr. Albert 
Salah, C.P. c/o Latin Patriarchate — 
AMMAM — (Transjordan) — In Pales- 
tine our Lord said: "Amen I say to 
you, as long as you did it to one of 
these my least brethren, you did it to 
me." (Matt. 25, 40). 



IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY PROVINCE 

(N. Italy) 



The Very Reverend Father Pro- 
vincial, Jeremias, could not let the 
Silver Consecration Jubilee of Bishop 
John Baptist Peruzzo, C.P. go by 
without a fitting recognition to the 
Jubilarian who once held the office of 
Provincial and is also the founder of 
the Preparatory Seminary in Cara- 
vate, the Provincial House. Septem- 
ber 6th was the day chosen for the 
celebration. A solemn Pontifical High 
Mass was celebrated by the Jubilarian 
in the forenoon and the Solemn Te 
Deum closed the official celebration of 
the day. Very Reverend Father Mal- 
colm, representing Father General 
was preseent, as well as all the Rec- 
tors of North Italy. The boys from 
the two Preparatory Seminaries of 
the Province supplied the music for 
the occasion. Even Professors and 
Seminarians from the Diocesan Semi- 
nary of His Excellency in Sicily came 
to pay homage to their Ordinary. 
Although born in 1878 it was noted 
how well preserved the voice of the 
Bishop was during the singing of the 
Mass and his eloquent sermon. In- 
teresting to note is the fact that the 



diocese His Excellency governs dates 
back to the first century according to 
the latest Annuario Pontificio. 



Naturally Molare, the birthplace of 
Bishop Peruzzo, could not refrain 
from doing their part in showing their 
respects to the Silver Jubilarian also. 
They did this on a magnificent scale. 
The program for September 8th was 
so compact that parts of it had to be 
dropped on account of the unexpected 
big crowds and the lack of time. No 
efforts were spared to make the day 
both a civic and ecclesiastical solemni- 
ty. In Molare our Fathers have a Re- 
treat and the pilgrimage church of 
N.S. delle Rocche. But not only Sep- 
tember 8th was a big day at Molare. 
Pilgrims are there almost continually, 
often waiting at the church door at 
early morn. Old and young come, 
some on foot others on bicycle, etc. 
Noteworthy on August 15th was the 
fact that the pilgrims themselves sang 
for the High Mass, modo gregoriano. 



In the Provincial House of the Pro- 
vince at Caravate opportunity is of- 



fered for closed Laymen's Retreats. 
It is the only Retreat of North Italy 
that does this. In the past year five 
such Retreats were conducted and the 
praises from the men as to the ideal 
location for a Retreat and the manner 
of conducting them is in the superla- 
tive; especially mentioned was the 
out-door Way of the Cross as being 
very helpful. 



Truth' is being received very highly in 
the Province, even to the extent that 
permission has been sought (and 
granted) to translate the work into 
Italian. 



Fr. Brice's book, 'In Spirit and in 



The two students publications of 
the Province, Gabriel and Dominicum 
are flourishing and improving and, we 
can say, are bringing a closer bond 
between the Passionist Students the 
world over. 



IMMACULATE CONCEPTION PROVINCE 

(Argentina) 



The "Santa Cruz", October 24th, 
offers a most enthusiastic welcome to 
Most Reverend Father General. The 
cover-design consists of a large pic- 
ture of His Paternity. The first page 
of the issue in question contains pic- 
tures of the Community of Sts. John 
and Paul with Fr. General and also 
the picture of the laying of the 
corner-stone of the new building at 
our Motherhouse in Rome. It is quite 
natural that the Fathers in Argentina 
should rejoice at Fr. General's visit. 
Father General is not only a member 
of the Province but by his many acti- 
vities there, before elected to the 



Generalate, earned for himself the es- 
teem and love of both his Brethren in 
religion and of the laity at large. It 
is our prayer that Fr. General will, in 
spite of his duties, feel a bit relaxed 
from his burdens in his "patria". We 
have heard that soon after the begin- 
ning of the new year Father will be 
on his way to Australia via Cali- 
fornia. 



Our Father Kenny Lynch got a full 
page and a half in the "Santa Cruz" 
via an article on Teresa Neumann 
which he wrote for THE CROSS 
some time ago. 



HOLY FAMILY PROVINCE 



(Spain) 



Readers of THE PASSIONIST, if 
they pray hard, may have an oppor- 
tunity to meet an old acquaintance in 
the person of Very Reverend Father 
Innocent, C.P., Provincial of the Holy 
Family Province, former Consultor 
General. Some of the Brethren have 
met Father as Consultor, others will 
remember him from his sojourn in the 



USA as a refugee from Mexico some 
32 years ago. God willing, Father in- 
tends to fly from Madrid to Havana 
December 23rd. Father intends to 
make the visitation of the three 
houses under his jurisdiction in Cuba: 
Havana, Santa Clara and Holguin. 
From Cul:a he hopes to visit his con- 
vents in Mexico, namely Tacubaya, 



59 



VISITATION 

(Right) Most Rev. Fr. Albert 
found awaiting his arrival in 
Chicago, an old friend of South 
America days, Rev. Fr. David 
Knott, C.P. (Below) Posing with 
the Students and Brothers, and 
their Director, Fr. Roger. 
(Above) The program of wel- 
come featured this display ar- 
ranged by the Students. 





Mi 






m 



11 ■ 




i ii 



a a b u 1 1 1 



Passionist Retreat and 
the Chapel of St. Gem- 
ma, Barcelona, Spain. 



Toluca and Guadalajara. From Mexi- 
co he will try to see the houses in 
Venezuela, namely Valencia, Barquisi- 
meto and Caracas. From these coun- 
tries to the USA is not so far, so we 
have hopes that His Paternity will 
decide to pay his old friends a visit. 
In Havana our Fathers opened a new 
large and very beautiful church last 
September 8th. Accompanying pic- 



ture gives a view of the St. Gemma 
Retreat and chapel opened May 14th 
1945 in Barcelona. There is a pic- 
ture of the Spanish Martyrs in transit 
to the PASSIONIST. We hope it will 
have arrived when we prepare the 
next issue so as to be able to present 
it to our readers. They are members 
of the Holy Family Province. 



PROVINCE OF THE HOLY CROSS 

(Chicago) 



Our news is scant, but precious, this 
time. The Province now has fourteen 
more "minorites". The 1st and 2nd 
year Theologians received Tonsure 
and the Minor Orders on the first 
three Sundays of Advent. The cere- 
monies took place in St. Andrew's 
Church in the city, the resident parish 
of Bishop Bernard J. Sheil. His Ex- 
cellency officiated. Thus we have 
fourteen more members of the Con- 
gregation taking the first steps up to 
that "active" participation in the 
Priesthood of Christ; for, of course, 
ever since their profession have they 

Very Rev. Fr. Herman, C.P., Rector of 
Immaculate Conception Retreat, Chi- 
cago, celebrated his Silver Jubilee, 
December 22, 1948. 



not had the fullest possible "passive" 




61 



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participation in that Priesthood that 
any vocation below it can bestow? 

The mission given by Frs. Stanis- 
laus, Conell and Canute at the parish 
here during the first three weeks of 
November was a "mission" of grace 
for the Students also. Opportunity 
was given them to attend all the ser- 
mons' during the men's week, with 
"box seats" right in front of the plat- 
form. 

Thanksgiving eve brought a big 
surprise from China in the person of 
Father Carl. He and our Father 
Paul and our six young Chinese mis- 
sionaries from the East were ordered 
home "quam primum" after their 
evacuation from Peiping. So, home 
they came, disappointed but obedient. 
O well, what was it our Holy Founder 
used to say? — "Omnia fiant ut fiunt." 



HOLY CROSS RETREAT 

(Cincinnati) 
In the November issue of THE 
PASSIONIST it was mentioned that 
Fr. Bonaventure had been made a 
member of the Community. On No- 
vember 15th he joined the ranks of 
our Brethren in eternity. There is no 
doubt that Father had been a sick 
man for many a year, still the actual 
end came a bit unexpectedly. During 
the first part of November he felt 
particularly ill. For three days he 
could take no nourishment. On the 
5th of November it was considered ad- 
visable to take him to the Good 
Samaritan Hospital in the city. There 
his trouble was diagnosed as adhesion 
of the bowels and an immediate opera- 
tion was deemed imperative. The 
operation was undertaken on Novem- 
ber 7th. Father then began to im- 



prove nicely until some days after the 
operation during a violent coughing 
spell he ruptured the bowel that had 
been operated on. This necessitated a 
second operation which was performed 
at 9:30 P.M. Sunday November 14th. 
Dr. Connolly,, Father's personal doc- 
tor, came from Chicago and was 
present for this second operation. 
After the operation all looked favor- 
able till the morning of the 15th. At 
about 4:30 A.M. a sudden turn for the 
worse was noticed and then the end 
came fast. By 10:40 P.M. of that 
same 15th of November Father Bona- 
venture had gone to eternity. His 
brothers Frank and Andrew and his 
Sisters Josephine and Mary came 
about 45 minutes after he had passed 
away. Father's last moments were 
very edifying; he seemed to have been 




Most recent picture taken of Fr. Bona- 
venture. Taken from his Identification 
Card in Palestine. December 12, 1946. 



63 





1923 SILVER JUBILEE 1948 

Holy Cross Province and The Pas- 
sionst extends heartiest congratula- 
tions to these and other Jubilarians 
shown in the pages of The Passionist. 
(Top, left to right) Fathers William 
Westhoven (at present in China), 
Gerard Berry, and Urban O'Rourke, 
C.P. (Left center) Fr. Cyprian Frank, 
C.P. (Right center) Fr. Sylvester Ci- 
chanski, C.P. (Below, left to right) 
Fathers Gregory McEttrick, Malachy 
Farrell, and Mark Hoskins, C.P. 




conscious to the end. In fact, in the 
moment of death, when Fr. Daniel 
told him he was going to give him 
absolution, Father made his last 
effort and it was to try to make the 
Sign of the Cross. Father Bonaven- 
ture loved the Congregation much, he 
worked much for it and suffered much 
for it. May he now be receiving his 
reward with the rest of the faithful 
followers of St. Paul above. His 
Obituary appears in another section 
of this issue. 



December 8th marked the Golden 
Jubilee of the Ordination of good Fr. 
Aurelius. He was celebrant of the 
Solemn High Mass and preached the 
sermon for the occasion. In the 
course of the sermon he also men- 
tioned the fact that the Bl. Mother 
Grotto of the Monastery had been 
completed also exactly fifty years pre- 
viously and that by his own Father. 
The Community celebrated, and con- 
gratulated Fr. Aurelius, on the fol- 
lowing day. We could say many 
beautiful and meritorious things 
about Father, but we respect his 
modesty and humility. 



Father Sylvester celebrated his sil- 
ver Ordination Jubilee in his own 
quiet way. He spent his "vacation" 
with his good old Mother in Detroit. 
THE PASSIONIST would like to re- 
pay in part Fr. Sylvester's kind co- 
operation by offering sincerest con- 
gratulations. 



Charles is bringing the monthly lec- 
tures on the Divine Indwelling, spon- 
sored by the Knights of Columbus in 
the Cincinnati area, to a huge success. 
The first lecture in September had an 
audience of about 550 men; now the 
number has nearly reached the thou- 
sand mark. 



Besides the highly successful Re- 
treat work (there is an average of 
more than twenty men a week making 
these retreats in the Monastery) Fr. 



SACRED HEART RETREAT 

(Louisville) 

Since mid-October it has been a 
little difficult to convince some of the 
members of our community that Ken- 
tucky's feudin' days are over. One 
afternoon a .22 bullet shattered its 
way through a second floor corridor 
window and bounced off the wall op- 
posite. Those of us who knew of the 
frequent target practice engaged in 
by the neighborhood boys in our 
bottoms were all too aware of the 
source of the trouble. Someone had 
aimed too high — just what we had 
been fearing all along. 

The Feast of Christ the King wit- 
nessed the laying of the corner stone 
of the new St. Agnes School. It 
rained nearly all day but let up for 
the few minutes required for the 
actual ceremony. Due to the wet 
weather the ceremony took place 
under a tent and only a small number 
of parishioners were present. Very 
Rev. Father Rector officiated in lieu 
of Rt. Rev. Msgr. Earl Willet, who 
was prevented from doing so by a 
sudden illness. Someone in the crowd 
was heard to remark that apparently 
Father Julius had used a trowel be- 
fore. The Rev. Felix N. Pitt, Arch- 
diocesan Superintendent of Schools, 
delivered a short sermon. On the 
whole, the weather here has been very 



65 



ST. AGNES 
CORNERSTONE 

Very Rev. Fr. Julius, 
Rector of Sacred Heart 
Retreat, officiates at the 
laying of the corner- 
stone of the new St. 
Agnes School, while Fr. 
Felix Pitt, Diocesan Di- 
rector of Schools (left), 
and Fr. Anselm, Pastor 
of St. Agnes Church, 
(right) look on. 




olden Jubilarian Fr. Adalbert, C.P. 
Ad Mult os Annos! 






"Vi* 




favorable to the speedy erection of the 
new building. 

We were very happy to have Very 
Rev. Father Provincial with us for a 
few days in November. His visit was 
prolonged somewhat by the death of 
Father Bonaventure and the subse- 
quent funeral. 

Father Bonaventure's body was 
brought to Louisville on Nov. 18th for 
burial on the following day. The 
funeral was a rather large affair, at- 
tended as it was by a goodly number 
of clergy from both the Louisville and 
the Owensboro Dioceses, as well as by 
members of various religious Orders. 
Father Edwin, C.P., outdid himself in 
the funeral oration to the great praise 
of all. May Father Bonaventure rest 
in peace. 

The feast of the Immaculate Con- 
ception marked the Golden Jubilee of 
Father Adalbert's ordination to the 
priesthood. A private but very fitting 
celebration was held the next day, 
Dec. 9th. Very Rev. Father Rector 
celebrated a Solemn High Mass of 
thanksgiving at 8 o'clock with the 
Students as choir. Dinner was served 



in the professed recreation, and it was 
followed by a little program of music 
performed by the Students. The re- 
mainder of the day was given to 
general rejoicing and all were agreed 
that this celebration, though simple, 
was most satisfactory and appropri- 
ate. It is recognized by everyone that 
Father Adalbert was one of our 
greatest missionaries and it was easy 
to thank God for his long career. Fa- 
ther reports that he gave five hun- 
dred missions and over seventy re- 
treats during the period of forty 
years that he was on th'e missions. 
Truly this is an extraordinary record. 
Among the many congratulations 
which Father Adalbert received he is 
especially proud of a letter of felici- 
tations from the General Curia. 

On Dec. 18th Fathers Jordan, 
Owen, Rene, Warren, Columban and 
Alvin received the Diaconate at the 
hands of Most Rev. John A. Floersh, 
Archbishop of Louisville. The Most 
Reverend Archbishop graciously per- 
formed the ceremony of Ordination in 
our St. Agnes Church. 



MOTHER OF GOOD COUNSEL 
RETREAT 

(St. Louis) 
For many well-known reasons the 
Feast of the Presentation of our 
Lady, November 21st, is dear to the 
heart of every real Passionist. The 
last occurrence of the Feast was par- 
ticularly enhanced for our Brethren 
in St. Louis by the presence of His 
Excellency, Archbishop Joseph E. 
Ritter, with his Secretary, Monsignor 
Helmsing. His Excellency presided at 
Solemn Compline and then gave the 
Benediction with the Blessed Sacra- 



ment to the assembled Community. 
After a tasty supper, prepared by our 
good Brothers, the Archbishop spent 
the recreation period with the Fathers 
and again confirmed his reputation as 
an interesting and genial entertainer. 
His Excellency also spent some time 
with the Seminarians to their great 
joy and profit. To all of us he ex- 
pressed his great joy in being able to 
visit us, and thanked us for the help 
we are giving him in the Archdiocese. 
The Archbishop's 'suggestion' that in 
honor of his visit, we have a holiday, 
met with a hearty approval. Thus 
the following day, November 22nd we 
all celebrated His Excellency's visit 
with us. November 21st, 1948 will 
linger in our memory, because of this 
gracious visit of the worthy successor 
of the Apostles, Archbishop Ritter. 



In the course of 1947 Father Walter 
conducted a Novena at the Old Cathe- 
dral in the city. Some of his listeners 
suggested to Father Murphy, S.J., 
Director of the Sacred Heart Hour on 
Station WEW, that Father Walter 
would be a worthwhile choice as a 
guest-speaker on this program. Con- 
sequently on November 28th, First 
Sunday of Advent, Fr. Walter spoke 
during the Sacred Heart Hour on 
"The Beginning of a Christian New 
Year". He acquitted himself quite 
capably, and we Passionists feel hon- 
ored to have been chosen to contribute 
to a work so laudable as the Sacred 
Heart Program. 



ST. FRANCIS RETREAT 

(St. Paul) 
Favorable circumstances made it 
possible to honor Fr. Cyprian with a 



67 



triple Silver Sacerdotal Jubilee cele- 
bration. December 12th, the South 
Mound Parish honored its zealous 
Pastor, while Erie did so on December 
19th. His religious Brethren in St. 
Francis Retreat gave their official 
congratulations on December 22nd. 

These celebrations together with the 
Forty Hours Devotion and Christmas 
preparations gave the Novitiate hard- 
ly any time to make or write news. 



ST. GABRIEL'S RETREAT 

(Des Moines) 

The outstanding events here during 
the last two months all occurred on 
Nov. 12. In the morning Fr. Ronan 
fainted from a bad attack of stomach 
flu. He was supposed to leave the 
next day for a mission, but Fr. Jere- 
mias took his place. A few hours 
later Fr. Rector had a heart attack 
and was taken to the hospital. For- 
tunately it was nothing serious, and 
he was soon back with us. 

We thought we had enough excite- 
ment for one day, but the worst was 
yet to come. That evening we were 
sitting in recreation with the door 
closed, discussing the days happen- 
ings. When the door was opened at the 
end of recreation, smoke poured in. 
We scattered everywhere, trying to 
locate the fire. Finally we found it, 
in Fr. Thomas More's room. With 
the aid of four fire-extinguishers mat- 
ters were soon under control. But 
there were some very anxious mo- 
ments. For the past many months 
Fr. Thomas More had been working 
constantly on his thesis — and it was 
in there in that fire! But thank God 
it wasn't touched. There was a lot of 
smoke, but the damage was rather 



light; a section of the floor, some 
plaster, most of his clothes, and the 
student's wire-recorder (which was in 
his room for "safe-keeping") were the 
only things destroyed. 

A large vacuum pump has been in- 
stalled in the basement. The differ- 
ence in the heating is very noticeable. 
We have nothing to fear now from 
the severe Iowa winters. 

As the brethren may notice from 
the 'Works of Ministry' list, we have 
been kept busy. During the last three 
months alone we have given 47 forty- 
hours. 



MATER DOLOROSA RETREAT 

(Sierra Madre) 
By the time this notice appears in 
print several tons of concrete will 
have been poured into the new retreat- 
house. And if Father Neil does not 
obtain some kind of communication 
system, like a "walkie-talkie" he will 
be completely exhausted from his fre- 
quent calls to the parlor and the tele- 
phone. Contractors, plumbers, elec- 
tricians seem to be converging on the 
place from all Southern California. 



A new road has been run up to the 
site of the future retreat house con- 
necting directly with Sunnyside. 
Brothers Gerald and Patrick are busy 
these days putting in a sprinkling 
system in the land just below the 
chapel. This area had been leveled 
off and terraced when the bulldozer 
was here to work on the site of the 
retreat house. A new lawn to the side 
of the chapel would enhance the view, 
and also provide a place for next 
year's fiesta. 



68 






First, Father Carl, then a few days 
later, Father Paul, surprised the Com- 
munity by appearing unannounced 
from the other side of the globe. 
They came home from China via 
Alaska, then down the Pacific coast. 



At present, southern California is 
about 18 months behind schedule on 
rainfall. Until we had our first rain 
the early part of December, the 
Forest Rangers were seen up here 
checking the section behind the mon- 
astery several times a day, and even 
at night. Their anxiety is not ground- 
less; there have been several serious 
fires of late. One blaze burned almost 
a week through Santa Ana and 
Orange counties. Mt. Baldy was also 
swept with a serious fire. Both these 
fires could be seen at night from the 
Monastery. Although the house was 
crowded with retreatants the after- 
noon of Saturday, December 4th, 
when the earthquake shook our area, 
still there was no panic. No damage 
was done. 



A professional tailor, Mr. Joe 
Bruno of Sierra Madre, has been 
hired to make the habits this season. 
He spends a full day in the tailor 
shop at the Monastery. One of the 
first things he did was to set up a big 
steam pressing machine in the tailor 
shop. Besides turning our habits, Mr. 
Bruno has been busy repairing and 
rejuvenating pants and coats for 
brethren of the Community. 



Recollection days for the diocesan 
clergy have been resumed this Fall. 
A very gratifying crowd of some 35 
priests were here November 17th. A 



mid-week retreat was held the last 
week of November, for about 30 stu- 
dents of the school of journalism from 
Loyola University. 



Father Edward's pamphlet on the 
false claims of Protestantism "Que 
dice la Biblica?" is apparently reach- 
ing a large audience among the Mexi- 
can population in this area. So much 
of the pamphlet material in Spanish is 
printed so unattractively that few are 
drawn to read it. Much of it origi- 
nates in Mexico, where the cost of 
paper and printing prohibit any .very 
attractive format. Whereas most of 
the anti-Catholic pamphlet material is 
printed this side of the Rio Grande 
and can entice readers even by its at- 
tractive appearance. Father Ed- 
ward's pamphlet hopes to offset this 
influence both by matter as well as 
form. 



ST. PAUL RETREAT 

(Detroit) 
Without doubt the Laymen's Re- 
treat House in Detroit has had an 
auspicious start. Since October 1st 
nine week-end retreats have been con- 
ducted. There has been a total of 213 
Retreatants, which means an average 
of more than 23 per week. At present 
the schedule is filled up to the end of 
March. Several parish groups are 
working in the direction of a retreat 
organization. Among other items of 
interest is the fact that non-Catholics 
also are making the Retreats. Most 
of the men have never made a closed 
Retreat before; by most is meant 
about 95 9£. Enthusiasm runs high 
among the Retreatants; their conduct 
whilst in the monastery is exemplary. 



69 





LAY RETREATS IN DETROIT 

(Above) Picture of the first 
group of lay retreatants at St. 
Paul of the Cross Monastery. 
Shown are, 1. to r., Very Rev. 
Fr. Clarence, Rector, Rev. Fr. 
Bartholomew, Retreat Master, 
and Rev. Fr. Declan, Retreat 
Director. Among the retreatants 
were Drs. Gariepy and Capano, 
and Mr. Boyle, and Mr. James 
Boyle jr. (Left) Brother Gilbert 
serving the men at table. (Be- 
low) Father Benedict at the 
organ for Benediction. Brother 
Aloysius, the Cook, preparing 
the meals that have gone over so 
big! 



Often they express their sincere in- 
tention to recruit others for the Re- 
treats. Their zeal to help fallen- 
aways or the indifferent among their 
acquaintances is shown by their buy- 
ing instruction books to distribute. 

The Monastic atmosphere, as in 
our other Retreat Houses so also here, 
is evidently exerting a very effective 
appeal to and influence upon the men 
making the Retreat. A great part of 
that "atmosphere" is created by the 
friendly interest of the Brethren, the 
tireless efforts of the Brothers, the 
playing of the organ for Benediction 
by Fr. Benedict (he impresses the 
men greatly), the visiting of the 
men's rooms for private conferences 
by Fathers Benedict, Alexis, David, 
Roland etc., giving the fruits of their 
experiences and their kindly interest. 
The men are highly grateful for all 
this. In one word the Retreats have 
become a Community interest. 



ST. JOSEPH'S RETREAT 

(Birmingham) 
The chapel of the Retreat has been 
enhanced by a new altar. So far we 
have not been able to ascertain who 
the donor was nor what the style of 
the altar be. We have, however, re- 
ceived the definite impression that the 
altar is a big improvement for the 
chapel. No doubt it will make the 
Missionaries upon return from their 
work feel more at home and more 
inclined to prepare once again for 
more work. Their schedule this fall, 
we are told, was a heavy one. 



Fr. Terrence. Now we hear that Fr. 
Gregory was suddenly taken ill in 
Grove Hill, Alabama, with a gan- 
grenous gall bladder. Fr. Ralph had 
to get him by car and take him to 
St. Vincent's Hospital in Birmingham. 
There the Sisters of Charity took ex- 
cellent care of Fr. Gregory so that he 
is expected home for Christmas. The 
Fathers of the Community are much 
indebted to the Sisters for their 
charity in this and other cases. 



The atmosphere of St. Joseph's 
seems also to favor literary produc- 
tions. Fr. Brice has another opus 
about ready for the printer. We 
would like to mention here that Fr. 
Brice's books and especially his last, 
have received great encomiums also 
from foreign C.P. Provinces. One has 
requested permission to translate. 



Brother Henry's ingenuity and urge 
to explore the unknown has lead him 
to discover a hitherto unknown 
huckle-berry patch on the property. 
Together with the big crop of black- 
berries, they give Brother the where- 
withall to put pleasant trimmings on 
the community table. 



In the last issue of THE PAS- 
SIONIST, St. Joseph's reported a sud- 
den and serious attack of sickness on 



CHRIST THE KING RETREAT 

(Sacramento) 
Father Angelo reports that he and 
the rest of the tiny Community in 
Sacramento were doubly glad to wel- 
come the Very Reverend Father Neil, 
Second Provincial Consultor, in their 
midst. For he brought with him the 
good word that definite progress was 
in sight for the building project. Al- 
most immediately he gave weight to 
the statement, for the very next morn- 



71 



ing after his arrival His Paternity 
was about the property with surveyor 
and architect. 



A short visit of Fr. Aiden on his 
way from Sierra Madre, revealed that 
he has a long schedule of missionary 
work in the Northwest. 



Father Pius is the regular Preacher 
for the monthly recollection days of 
the Diocesan Clergy in Sacramento. 
The recommendations from the priests 
of his good work tell us that he is 
spreading the good name of the Con- 
gregation and laying the seed for re- 
quests in the line of Missions. 



Father Gabriel was in the hospital 
for a few days, but is now back home 
and in fine spirits. When he is not 
out engeged in works of the ministry, 
he is in back of the white apron at 
home, ministering to the bodies of the 
Community. 



HOLY NAME RETREAT 

(Houston) 

Holy Name Retreat is happy to re- 
port that its missionaries have been 
busy throughout the Fall. Missions, 
Retreats, Days of Recollection and 
one Novena kept the Fathers busy 
almost without interruption from Sep- 
tember to December. 

There is a very large field for mis- 
sionary activity in Texas for a mis- 
sionary who can preach in Czech. Fr. 



John Aelred (notice Father Aelred 
has a prefix to his name) is getting 
quite a share of this work although 
his knowledge of Czech limits him to 
the work in the Confessional. The 
Reverend Pastors claim there are very 
few Czech Missioners in the United 
States. 



On November 26th, Frs. Aloysius, 
John Aelred and Conleth represented 
the Passionist Fathers at the double 
celebration of the 30th anniversary of 
the consecration of Bishop Byrne and 
the 100 anniversary of the consecra- 
tion of the Galveston Cathedral. 



From the "Laymen's Retreat News" 
we learn that Fr. Conleth runs a 
weekly column in the "Southern Mes- 
senger". Also that recollection Days 
are being held under our auspices, 
sometimes in the Retreat House, some- 
times elsewhere. Also two parish Re- 
treats are being sponsored by Fr. 
Conleth. 

We must also congratulate Holy 
Name Retreat House on the not only 
attractive but also thought-provoking 
folder lately off the press. Its con- 
tents give the philosophy below the 
Retreat Idea, words of Our Lord, of 
the Holy Fathers, of Bishop Byrne, of 
men who have made a Retreat, of the 
influence retreatants make on those 
with whom they live. Also a pen 
sketch of the proposed Retreat House 
is given. The building is planned to 
have 60 private rooms. 



OUR PARISHES 

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION grand blessing to all concerned. The 

(Chicago) first week, opening on the Feast of 

From all reports the Three-week Christ the King was for the benefit of 

Mission held in the parish was a the married women; the second week 



72 



for the married men; the third week 
for young unmarried men and women 
from High School age on. During the 
first week also the Children's Mission 
was conducted. The Missioners were 
our Fathers Stanislaus, Conell and 
Canute. At the closing of the man's 
Mission new members were admitted 
to the local Holy Name Society. 



November 30th was also a big oc- 
casion for the parish. Bishop Wm. 
O'Brien administered the Sacrament 
of Confirmation. The Procession be- 
fore and after services, from the 
Monastery to the Church and back, 
was flanked on both sides by numer- 
ous parishioners. 



November 14th was declared "Res- 
urrection Hospital Sunday". From all 
pupits of the various denominations, 
regardless of creed, appeals were 
made to further the project of the 
new hospital in Norwood Park. This 
hospital will be in charge of the Res- 
urrectionist Sisters, our neighbors in 
Chicago. 



The annual Novena in honor of the 
Immaculate Conception, Patroness of 
the Parish, was announced as a very 
good opportunity to renew the mission 
resolutions and to obtain our Heaven- 
ly Mother's help. Fr. Godfrey was 
the preacher for the services. 



On December 12th, Fr. Timothy, a 
former Pastor of the Parish, cele- 
brated a Solemn High Mass in the 
Parish Church, at 12 o'clock, in 
thanksgiving on the occasion of the 
Silver Jubilee of his ordination to the 
Holy Priesthood. 



HOLY FAMILY 

(Ensley) 
The enrollment of Holy Family 
High School this school-year is 103; 
the Grammar School 395. Two of the 
last year's graduates are at Mar- 
quette University, Milwaukee; one at 
Howard University, Washington, D.C. 
and one girl at Loyola University, 
New Orleans. It is always a big 
compliment to a school if its students 
continue their studies at higher insti- 
tutions of learning. During the past 
summer also, three delegates were 
chosen from the school to attend the 
Catholic Students' Mission Crusade 
Convention in Notre Dame, Ind. 



ST. MARY'S 
(Fairfield) 

St. Mary's in Fairfield did not ap- 
pear prominently in the last issues of 
THE PASSIONIST, not because 
there was no space, nor because there 
was no news. There was plenty of 
both. But the news, somehow, did not 
get written. 

However, we now break the silence 
and report that things are moving 
along very well. On the Feast of 
Christ the King there were eleven per- 
sons baptized and ten of them made 
their first Holy Communion. The 
picture of the First Communion Class 
includes a little girl (on the right) 
who was baptized but who will not 
make her First Holy Communion till 
next spring. She was a flower-girl at 
this year's ceremony. 

The new school is progressing too, 
but not fast enough. The slowness of 
the contractors and sub-contractors is 
sometimes exasperating. It is true 
we were held up for two months for 



73 





Fairfield, Alabama. Fr. Edmund watches his flock and his school grow. Above, 
First Communion class, Feast of Christ the King, October 31, 1948. 



steel, but since then things could have 
moved faster. Now we are beginning 
to be delayed by rainy weather. But 
we hope to move in by the first of 
the year. 

From the MISSION BROADCAST 
we learn that the enrollment in St. 
Mary's School in September was 178 
with four teaching Sisters. The 
crowd is so big that Fr. Edmund must 
use the church as a class-room until 
he can move into the new school. The 
appeal for aid in building the school 
did not bring one tenth of what the 
school will cost, but our heroic Breth- 
ren "down South" seem to have an 
unlimited trust in Providence. 



ST. GEMMA 

(Detroit) 
The most important event since the 
last issue of THE PASSIONIST was 
our Parish Feather Party, held No- 
vember 9th, in St. Valentine's Parish 
Hall. Our neighboring Pastor is very 
kind and permitted us to use his 
parish hall for our party. The net 
profit amounted to $1228.58, which in- 
cludes the net from Bingo games for 
turkies and the raffle of the six tickets 
for the football games. The latter in- 
cluded two tickets to the Notre Dame 
and Northwestern game, plus $100.00 
expenses; two for the Michigan and 
Indiana game, plus $50.00 and two for 
the Detroit Lions and Chicago Cardi- 



74 



nals, plus $25.00, a good sum con- 
sidering that we have about one- 
hundred and fifty active families in 
the parish. 



enough to cover the ordinary ex- 
penses. We are hoping for approval 
of the plans and of building in Spring. 



Another financial experiment which 
proved most successful was a Grand 
Bazaar held by the Altar and Rosary 
Society. The good ladies collected 
fancy work, needle work, baked goods 
and sold these from 1 P.M. to 9 P.M. 
on Thursday, December 2nd. There 
was also a religious article table for 
rosaries and medals etc. The Society 
members worked hard in preparation 
and during the hours of the Bazaar. 
In the little house we use as parish 
hall the Ladies displayed and sold 
these various articles and realized 
over $400.00 during the hours of the 
sale. Our parishioners were very 
generous in donating articles, and we 
must mention too, that many friends 
of the parish were equally generous. 



The Diocesan Building Commission 
has finally approved of a plot plan 
submitted by the Pastor. We call this 
plan "G", which outlines a church to 
seat six-hundred people, an eight 
grade school, a convent for ten Sis- 
ters and a parish-hall large enough to 
seat four-hundred people. The per- 
mission granted by the Building Com- 
mission is for our architect to make 
the preliminary plans of the parish 
hall. To help prove that the parish 
can carry the debt of the hall we have 
paid the interest on the debt and 
$2,000 on the principal. This is an 
accomplishment of which the parish is 
very proud; it should be, for one year 
of operating. The Sunday collection 
now averages $120.00, more than 



PROVINCE OF ST. GABRIEL 

(Belgium) 
Good news comes from the Congo: 
the foundation of a new mission post: 
Omendjadi, on the territory of Lodja. 
It is the seventh district whose evan- 
gelization our valiant missionaries 
have undertaken. To Very Reverend 
Father Robert, Superior, and his as- 
sistant, Father Eugene, the "Passion- 
ist" extends its best wishes for a long 
and fruitful apostolate. It asks of its 
readers, also, fervent prayers for 
their intentions. For all realize the 
importance of prayer in missionary 
labors, and the good results that ac- 
crue therefrom for the people of the 
mission territories. 



From the Belgian Congo we have 
also the glad tidings of the ordination 
of Father Victor Kainda. Coinciden- 
tal with this ordination is that it is 
the first conferred in the Vicariate by 
our first Vicar-Apostolic, Bishop Ha- 
gendorens. However, Father Kainda 
Victor is the third priest of the Vi- 
cariate of Tshumbe St. Mary. The 
first, Wandja Victor, was ordained at 
Tshumbe by Bishop Demol, Vicar- 
Apostolic of Kasai. The second, 
Djamba Alphonse, at the Seminary of 
Kabwe, also by the same Bishop 
Demol. 

Unique among ordination cere- 
monies was the fact that this one was 
held in the open air, on Pentecost 
Sunday. 

Among the Europeans present at 
the ordination ceremonies, and deserv- 



75 



ing of special mention, were Mr. 
Carlier, Commissariate of the District, 
as well as Mr. Parent, chief adminis- 
trator of the territory of Katoko- 
Kombe. Very Rev. Father Aloysius, 
Religious Superior of the Picpus Fa- 
thers; Very Rev. Father Benedict, 
Religious Superior of the Passionists, 
as well as the Black Fathers of our 
Vicariate, were also in attendance. We 
regretted that the Fathers of Scheut 
and the Fathers of the Holy Spirit 
were unable to attend the ordination. 
Present at the ordination cere- 
monies were the ordinand's mother 
with her other children and grand- 
children. In impressive tones, the 
Bishop delivered an eloquent dis- 
course, stressing the necessity of 
bringing up children in a Christian 
way, and praising the good mother for 
her sufferings and sacrifices which 
were instrumental in leading another 



worthy candidate to the altar of God. 



The "Revue Passioniste" continues 
to extell Bl. Mary Goretti, in a recent 
issue with an original picture and a 
long poem. Lengthy reprints of the 
works of Fr. Cajetan, a deceased 
member of the Province, who made a 
name for himself in the entire Con- 
gregation by his wroks on St. Paul 
of the Cross and our Order. The last 
two articles in the Revu taken from 
Fr. Cajetan's books, were on the 
"Sign". 

Fr. Xavier, C.J., from the Retreat 
in Natoye, has sent us an article on 
the Retreat in Ere, founded by Ven. 
Fr. Dominic of the Mother of God. 
We intend to have this article re- 
printed in THE PASSIONIST in the 
near future together with views of 
the Retreat that were sent with the 
article. 



PROVINCE OF OUR LADY OF HOLY HOPE 

(Holland) 



Seldom does it happen that all the 
Novices who take the habit persevere 
till Profession day. This did happen 
for the first time in the Province on 
September 7th, 1948 when seven No- 
vices took the four vows in the Re- 
treat of Our Lady of Holy Hope. On 
that same day four Postulants re- 
ceived the Holy Habit. The number 
was increased by the coming of the 
two German Novices on September 
13th. They were accompanied by the 
Vice-Provincial, Father Walter. One 
of the two, Cfr. Norbert, (Anthony 
Toll) made his Profession October 
27th; the other had started his Novi- 
tiate in Germany, September 7th. In 
Mook seven Confraters pronounced 



their perpetual vows September 15th. 
May they all persevere and keep up 
the zealous spirit reigning in the Pro- 
vince. 

An important date in the history of 
the Province will always be September 
13th when Fr. Gabriel, Provincial, 
solemnly blessed the new St. Paul of 
the Cross Minor Seminary in Mook. 
The Province now has two minor 
Seminaries. It will be remembered 
that this property had been bought 
some time ago and that the buildings 
were badly damaged during the late 
war. The work of restoration is far 
from complete. But during the past 
six months two of the worthy Lay- 
Brothers have worked hard with the 



76 



*5*' 



\/:*iif- ^J. 



MISSION EXHIBITION. (Above) 

At the Mission Exhibition at Haar- 
lem, Holland, Fr. Hubert, C.P., a 
veteran of 15 years on the Bulgarian 
missions, explains different attrac- 
tions of the Passionist booth to 
Msgr. W. Bouter, Bishop of Nellore, 
British India, and Msgr. N. Stam, 
Bishop of Kisumu, Africa (right). 




(Above) Fr. Martin C.P. 
shows the hunted head of 
a Dapok (Borneo) to visi- 
tors to the Passionist 
booth. 

(Left) Fr. (Jerard points 
out excellent samples of 
Bulgarian embroidery. 



hired help, and during the summer va- 
cation practically all the Seminarians 
have put their hand to the job, so that 
the essentials for running order are 
complete. All is expected to be in 
good order by Christmas. Father 
Hugh, C.P., Ph.D., has modled a fine 
statue of St. Paul of the Cross to be 
placed in a prominent position on the 

grounds. 

The mission in Borneo, in charge of 
the Province, is not being forgotten. 
Soon two Fathers will leave for that 
distant land and two further ones are 
studying the language in Tilburg with 
the Capuchin Fathers. 



cordial with the Bishop for in the 
course of the audience His Holiness 
playfully fondled the long flowing 
beard of Brother Francis, C.P. who 
accompanied His Excellency. The 
Province presented its Bishop with a 
highly artistic pectoral Cross and 
ring, before he departed for Rome. 



Some time during September 
Bishop Eugene, C.P., Ordinary of 
Nicopolis in Bulgaria, had a rather 
lengthy audience with the Holy Fa- 
ther. It seems that conditions in Bul- 
garia have not changed much for the 
better. Whether Bishop has returned 
to his See or not we do not know. 
The Holy Father must have been very 

ST. 



In October the Holy See gave its 
first approval to the Passionist Mis- 
sionary Sisters of St. Gemma, an In- 
stitute founded by the present Pro- 
vincial whose purpose, besides per- 
sonal sanctification, is the active help- 
ing of the Missions that are in charge 
of the Fathers of the Province. The 
approval is as a Pia Unio until a fur- 
ther approval is granted. Upon this, 
the Ordinary of Roermond (Mook is 
in this diocese) petitioned the Holy 
See for the exclaustration of Mother 
Mary Vincentia, C.P., cloistered Nun 
in Sittard, so that she could be the 
first Superior of the new Institute and 
instill into it the Passionist Spirit. 



PATRICK PROVINCE 

(Ireland) 
St. Patrick's Province through its 8; Men 1; Women 1 
zealous and hearty Fr. Hilary has 
probably broken a record in our Con- 
gregation as to the amount of minis- 
terial work done in eleven months. As 
is known he was invited to Nigeria 
by the Ordinary. From November 
7th, 1947, to September 17th, 1948, he 
conducted 42 works of the ministry. 
For groups of the Clergy 17; Sisters 



Boys 1; Girls 3; 
Mixed adults 3; Seminarians 1; Stu- 
dents 6; Teachers 1. This entailed 
about 240 days on which Father was 
actually engaged in works of the 
ministry and some 5,270 miles of in- 
land travel. May the fruits be great 
both for the Preacher and the lis- 
teners ! 



GERMAN VICE-PROVINCE 



We are grateful to Father Columba 
Moore for the contents of the follow- 
ing report of our Germano Austrian 



Vice-Province. Last November it was 
a year that five volunteers from the 
Province of St. Paul of the Cross ar- 



78 



rived in their field of labor. Since 
then one of them, Fr. Victor Stock- 
meyer, had to return to the States. 
The remaining group of four were di- 
vided. Frs. Ambrose and Fr. Colum- 
ba remained at St. Gabriel's Retreat 
in Pasing-Munich, the first as Vicar 
of the Retreat, the second as Vice- 
Prefect of the Preparatory Semi- 
narians there. The first week in St. 
Gabriel's was very quiet, then came an 
appeal from the ONLY Army Chap- 
lain in Munich for help at the 98th 
General Hospital and also at Dachau 
Camp on Sundays. Fr. Walter, Vice- 
Provincial, who was present at the 
time of the appeal, accepted. Since 
July 9th, Frs. Columba and Ambrose 
are the only priests caring for the 
spiritual needs of the Catholic Per- 
sonell and Patients at the 98th. The 
Fathers visit the hospital on Tuesday 
and Thursday afternoons and one 
takes care of the Mass on Sundays. 
After the Mass, since the only Ameri- 
can Chaplain does not speak English 
well, our Fathers also take care of 
the preaching at the beautiful St. 
Ludwig's Church. The Fathers also 
are subject to emergency calls to the 
hospital 24 hours of the day and there 
have been many. On Sundays one of 
the Fathers also celebrates Holy Mass 
at Dachau for the American G.I. 
prisoners and dependants. Religious 
instruction is held twice a week for 
children of grammar and high-school 
age. For the older folk a course on 
marriage has been given and now one 
on the sacraments is running. The 
Fathers wear their habit during their 
administrations and are often ac- 
costed with: Have you, Father, a 
Monastery in Chicago . . . Detroit . . . 



Cincinnati etc.? Both Father Colum- 
ba and Fr. Ambrose are rated as 
U.S.A. Auxiliary Chaplains and are 
doing wonderful work, an emergency 
in which they can look to St. Paul of 
the Cross as a model who also, when 
occasion offered, acted as Army Chap- 
lain. 

During October, Fr. Walter, Vice- 
Provincial, succeeded in entering the 
Russian-Austria Zone to conduct a 
visitation in our Maria Schutz Retreat 
there. As a result Fr. John was con- 
firmed as Rector of the Monastery. 
Fr. John is a Swiss-German and has 
received a permit from the Swiss 
Government to take up residence in 
Austria. Fr. John was professed in 
our Congregation (already ordained 
to the priesthood) in 1930. At present 
he is the oldest European Priest in 
the Vice-Province and has been highly 
successful in giving Missions, Retreats 
and occasional Sermons. 



One of the Fathers is still in Rus- 
sian captivity, Fr. Joseph. The other, 
Fr. Dominic, who returned lately is 
slowly recovering from the effects of 
his experience in the Russian Captivi- 
ty. At his return a few months ago, 
the effects had been so dire that one 
of his own classmates in religion did 
not recognize him. 



Thanks to the generosity of Ameri- 
can Brethren and friends plus the 
bountiful harvest from the Monastery 
Gardens, the Fathers have sufficient to 
eat, but meat and fats are very 
scarce and that tells on the scales no- 
ticeably for all concerned. Also grad- 
ually repairs are being made on the 
monastery buildings. In the Prepara- 



79 



tory Seminary there are six boys 
aging, 12, 13, 14, 17, 22 and 28. None 
of them will be ready for the Noviti- 
ate before two years and then only 
two. 

From Holland where the German 
Students are making their Philosophi- 
cal and Theological Studies as well as 
taking their Novitiate training come 
glowing reports of the grand hospi- 
tality and wonderful C.P. spirit 
among the Brethren there. If we 
understand rightly there are two stu- 
dents in Holland and one Novice. No 
further vocations of any kind except 



the six mentioned in the Prep Sem. 
If hard beginnings augur Golden ages 
then the German Vice-Province is cer- 
tainly in line for a Golden Age. 



In October the Vice-Province re- 
ceived help in the person of Fr. 
Hubert, C.P., from the Province of 
Our Lady of Holy Hope (Holland). 
Father Hubert is well versed in the 
German language. He had been work- 
ing in Bulgaria for many a year. 
There his "German" parish was closed 
so he has permission now to continue 
his work in Germany. 



PASSIONIST NUNS 



ST. GABRIEL CONVENT 

(Scranton) 
August 12th it was our privilege to 
meet Most Reverend Father General. 
To our great joy, His Paternity cele- 
brated the Community Mass for us. 
After breakfast Very Reverend Fa- 
ther Rector accompanied him into the 
inclosure and we had a delightful in- 
formal visit in the chapter room 
where we heard all about Fatima. 
Later Father met all the nuns again 
at their various offices throughout the 
convent. After the Feast of the As- 
sumption we celebrated the event 
with a "Gaudeamus." 



On the Feast of the Immaculate 
Heart of Mary, along with our other 
Retreats and Monasteries we solemn- 
ly consecrated our little Community to 
Her Pure Heart using the formula 
composed for the purpose. That same 
day our Heavenly Mother brought us 
a new Postulant. On September 17th 
our novice, Cons. Mary Gemma, made 



her profession. On the feast of St. 
Michael Cons. Mary Elisabeth and 
Cons. John Mary made their final pro- 
fession. Then on October 16th we had 
the double ceremony of vestition and 
final profession of Cons. Mary Ger- 
trude and Cons. Marie Louise respec- 
tively. And finally we cannot fail to 
make mention of the fine Retreat 
which Fr. Alban Lynch, C.P., of the 
Scranton Monastery, conducted for us 
prior to the Feast of the Presentation 
of our Blessed Mother. 



One of the Mothers in Scranton, in 
fact the Second Counselor, a very ex- 
emplary religious, is very sick and 
prayers are requested for her re- 
covery. 



ST. JOSEPH MONASTERY 

(Owensboro) 
In the first place we must make a 
correction from what the PAS- 
SIONIST reported in the November 
issue. It was Fr. Kevin, not Fr. 



80 




The new wall at St. Joseph's Passionist Convent in Owensboro, Ky, provides the 
Passionist Nuns with their much desired cloister. 



Joyce, who gave the three-day Retreat 
in Preparation for the Feast of the 
Presentation of Mary and all agree it 
was a good retreat. 



CONVENT OF THE SACRED PASSION 

(Erlanger) 
If THE PASSIONIST could pene- 
trate into the supernatural, we might 
be able to give a glowing news report 
from Marydale. As it is all we can 
report is the excellent Retreat before 
the Feast of the Presentation of Mary 
conducted by Fr. Alfred. "We were 
very happy to be the fortunate ones 
chosen for his first retreat to contem- 
platives, and hope it is the beginning 
of many like appointments for him. 



IMMACULATE CONCEPTION 
CONVENT 

(St. Louis) 

We derived much spiritual profit 
fi jn. our recent retreat preparatory 
tc the Feast of Our Blessed Mother's 
Presentation in the Temple, which 



was all the more appreciated in that it 
was our first retreat for more than 
a year. We had been deprived of our 
usual annual retreat because of the 
construction work being done in the 
convent. God sent us Reverend Fa- 
ther Joyce to conduct this triduum 
which was very inspiring and help- 
ful. Mindful that the particular pur- 
pose of this retreat is a preparation 
for the renewal of vows, Reverend 
Father stressed the role of the holy 
vows as essential means of acquiring 
union with God. Each of the religious 
was highly pleased to have made such 
a retreat under Reverend Father's 
guidance and no less were the two 
postulants for whom this was their 
first cloistered retreat. 



With the exception of the retreat, 
life behind the grille goes on almost 
uneventfully now that we are fully 
enclosed and we are able to carry out 
uninterruptedly our "holy routine." 
But we did celebrate the Feast of the 
Immaculate Conception with more 
than usual fervor since it is our titu- 



81 



CEREMQNY OF ENCLOSURE 

The canonical enclosure of the Pas- 
sionist Nuns at Immaculate Concep- 
tion Convent, St. Louis, Missouri, 
was established by Most Rev. Arch- 
bishop Joseph E. Ritter, on October 
9, 1948. After saying Mass, and 
giving the Benediction of the Most 
Blessed Sacrament, Archbishop 
Ritter blessed each of the new 
community as they filed into the 
enclosure, and turned the key in 
the lock, thus giving the Passionist 
Nuns at St. Louis the inestimable 
privilege of their beloved enclosure. 
(Right) The Archbishop is assisted 
by Very Rev. Father Berry, C.SS.R. 




lar feast and also this year's was the 
first anniversary of our leaving Pitts- 
burgh. We are grateful to our Dear 
Lord for His care of us during these 
strenuous days of pioneering. We 
also wish to express our gratitude to 
the Brethren, especially to Very Rev- 
erend Father Rector and all the Com- 
munity of Our Lady of Good Counsel 
for their gracious charity and assist- 
ance these past twelve months. 



The September number of "II San- 
tuario di N.S. delle Rocche" com- 
memorating the 25th anniversary of 
the arrival of the Passionist Nuns in 
Ovada gives us a few interesting facts 
about that foundation. One of the 
most prominent members that the 
Province of the Immaculate Heart of 
Mary ever had, was responsible for 
the Nuns coming to Ovada, the birth- 
place of St. Paul of the Cross. It 
was no other than Fr. Stanislaus of 
the Addolorata. Fr. Stanislaus died 
as Prefect Apostolic in the Tanganyi- 
ka African Mission. In his earlier 
life he held many posts of responsi- 
bility in the Congregation including 
Provincial and General Consultor. He 
was also a very prolific writer es- 
pecially on matters pertaining to the 
Congregation. The Nuns in Ovada 
besides their contemplative life also 
give opportunity for closed retreats 
in relatively large numbers. The Con- 
vent of Our Lady of Lourdes, as it is 
called, has given evidence of much life 
in the fact that it has two other Con- 
vents of Nuns to its credit, one in 
Quarto dei Mille, the other in Cam- 
pagnano, both in Italy. Furthermore 
it has sacrificed two of its members to 
the Convent in Loretto. All this in 



the space of less than three years. At 
present there are forty-two nuns in 
the Convent and in its 26 years of ex- 
istence six of its religious have 
changed their earthly convent with 
the heavenly one. 



From Holland we hear that Sep- 
tember 26th was Profession Day for 
the C.P. Nuns in Sittard. Two Sis- 
ters pronounced their perpetual vows 
in the hands of the Bishop of Roer- 
mond assisted by the Provincial of 
the Holland Province, Father Gabriel. 
The Convent now has 23 professed 
Nuns and 3 Postulants. 



Mother Gertrude, C.P., of the Pre- 
sentation Convent in Tarquinia (Cor- 
neto) writes they are busy preparing 
relics of Bl. Mary Goretti whose 
Canonization they expect during the 
coming Holy Year, 1950. 



The Passionist Nuns in Sables have 
hopes that their chapel, for which the 
PASSIONIST placed an appeal in the 
November issue, will be under roof 
before winter sets in. The Nuns 
there are collecting stamps, with the 
sale of which they intend to help de- 
fray the building expenses. Any do- 
nation of stamps to them would be 
highly appreciated. 



Our Nuns in Mamers, France, were 
highly delighted to have an opportuni- 
ty to meet some Passionist Sisters 
from Ireland who were staying at 
Mans studying French. Mother Joseph 
wrote of her great joy in recognizing 
the Spirit of St. Paul of the Cross 
also in the active Passionist Sisters. — 
In this Community we hear of a new 



83 



institution among the Passionist 
Nuns, an "out-door Sister". At 
present the first "out-door Sister" is 
making her second year of Novitiate, 
which means she is being initiated in- 
to the out-door life. With special per- 
mission of the Bishop she remains in 
the inclosure at night and also for the 
spiritual reading in the morning in 
the Novitiate. The second "out-door 
Sister" is now making her canonical 
year of the Novitiate. 



The Community at Vignanella late- 
ly had a double joy: two of the Nuns 
celebrated their silver jubilee and 
about the same time Sister Mary, a 
member of the Community, went to 
her heavenly reward after four years 
of intense suffering. Father Titus, 
former General of the Congregation 
and at present Second Consultor 
General, writes he believes that Sister 
Mary went straight to heaven. 



The Bishop of Genoa has given the- 
Nuns permission to keep the stipends' 
of Two hundred Masses they might! 
receive to enable them to enlarge their 
Convent. Several Convents in Italy 
write for Mass Stipends to be used foi" 
similar purposes. The Nuns in Na- 
ples are praying for means to be able 
to move to a more suitable location. 
Nuns in Campagnana, Lucca, Lorettoj 
and Ovada are all writing in about! 
the same strain: There are manyj 
seeking admission but because of the 
condition of the country they cannot i 
offer the dowry. All the convents i 
have and are still suffering as a con- 
sequence of the war, but the spirit of I 
generosity and trust in Divine Provi- 
dence that the Nuns practice must I 
make the heart of St. Paul of the: 
Cross very happy. In Madrid the: 
Nuns are praying for a better loca- 
tion; their temporary residence is too: 
small and has not sufficient grounds. 



PASSIONIST SISTERS 



When the school census was pub- 
lished this fall, it was found that the 
Passionist Sisters conduct the second 
largest elementary school in the dio- 
cese of Providence, with an enrollment 
of 877 pupils. 



tion for the children of his parish., 
They leave Providence at 8:00 A.M. 
and return at about 12:30 P.M. 
Transportation is provided by a mem- 
ber of the Holy Name Society in St. 
Bernard's parish. 



At the request of Rev. C. Collins, 

pastor of St. Bernard's Church, Again we entreat our brothers ini 

Wickf ord, three Sisters travel each Christ, to help foster vocations for the 

Saturday to conduct religious instruc- Passionist Sisterhood. 



(Center) Sr. Clotilde, C.P., Superior of the Retreat House (left) receives re- 
treatants. (Right) The beautiful chapel at Peace Dale. 

(Bottom) The Sisters (left) preparing the meals for their retreatants, in the I 
Retreat kitchen. (Right) Serving breakfast. 



84 




RETREAT HOUSE OF THE 

IMMACULATE HEART OF 

MARY 

Eily Pads, in Peace Dale, 
Rhode Island, has recently 
been acquired by the Passion- 
ist Sisters, of Providence, and 
converted into a Retreat 
House for Women. The 12 
acre estate possesses the 
beautiful, roomy house shown 
in the picture at the left, and 
below, which will accommo- 
date thirty women. Fr. 
Kilian McGowaan, C.P., is 
the Retreat Master, conduct- 
ing the saying of the Rosary. 



Pictures— Courtesy of the Providence Sunday Journal 





aria 



During the latter part of November 
Monsignor McCullough, for many a 
year Pastor of St. Mary's, Pittsburgh, 
Kansas, passed to a better life. Our 
Brethren who were ever "de Familia" 
in our Kansas Retreat will remember 
Monsignor very well. He was a fre- 
quent visitor at the Monastery and a 
faithful representative at all our oc- 
casions. Our Fathers were also often 
called for ministerial work in his 
parish. R.I. P. 

Mr. Charles Brown, killed during 
the Anzio Invasion, was buried from 
Holy Cross Church, Louisville, Ky., 
December 3rd, 1948. Some of the 
Brethren will remember Mr. Brown as 
Cfr. Athanasius of the Precious 
Blood, professed August 4th, 1927. 
Among his effects, returned to Mr. 
Greenwell, next kin, was found a 
Passionist Sign plus an envelope 
marked "not to be opened till after 
death." The envelope contained his 
dimisorial papers and a letter from 
the then Provincial attesting to his 
good character and the absence of any 
impediment to Orders. The Chap- 
lain of the army division to which Mr. 
Brown was attached attested that Mr. 
Brown had been most apostolic in his 
relation to fellow soldiers, having been 
a real Catholic Actionist. This infor- 
mation was received through the 
courtesy of Brother Gabriel and it is 




hoped that it will occasion prayers for 
the repose of the soul of once Con- 
frater Athanasius. R.I.P. 



The Retreat in Detroit lost a grand 
benefactor when, November 21st, Mr. 
Miles died of cancer. Let us not for- 
get our benefactors when their ma- 
terial benefactions cease. 



All English speaking Passionists 
greeted with joy the idea of printing 
our Act of Consecrating the Congre- 
gation to the Immaculate Heart of 
Mary on the reverse side of a picture 
of our Lady of Fatima. For months 
we have been wanting to find out who 
the author of the original prayer is 
and who put it into an English dress. 
Both have done a very good piece of 
work and both seem to be succeeding 
in hiding their identity. We feel that 
honor should go to whom it is due, 
otherwise it will go to some one to 
whom it is not due, at least there is 
great danger that this will happen. 
We have a little more information on 
the actual printing of the English 
version in its present beautiful form. 
Fr. Frederick, Provincial Secretary of 
the Province of St. Paul of the Cross 
happened to show the picture of Our 
Lady of Fatima to our Father Joseph, 
First Provincial Consultor. Father 
Joseph conceived the idea of putting 



86 



our Act of consecration on the re- 
verse side. He spoke to Father Pro- 
vincial about it who, in turn, whole- 
heartedly greeted the idea and thus 
now we have the prayer which, except 
for Father Joseph, might have re- 
mained hidden in the Local or Pro- 
vincial Archives, to be dusted off per- 
haps once a year and be used only on 
the Feast of the Immaculate Heart of 
Mary. 

The 1949 C.P. Ordo for the North 
American Provinces has appeared a 
bit changed from former issues, both 
inside and outside. For the first time 
the "Sign" appears on the cover and 
the Imprimatur of Father General in 
the inside. Both should have been in 
former editions; we might say they 
were there virtually but should have 
been there actually. The list of 
Eulogia to be inserted into the Mar- 
tyrology is also lengthened consider- 
ably due to the official additions by 
the Holy See. (Vide Acta Apostolicae 
Sedis March 1948.) The Vatican 
Press is now advertising a new and 
complete Martyrology. Thus with the 
new Martyrology the next edition of 
our Ordo could be shortened by some 
seven pages. The variations in Mass 
and Office for particular places have 
all been placed in a Supplement with 
a reference on the particular day. 
This arrangement we think will be 
equally as serviceable as the other and 
it does save some space. The com- 
memoration of Bl. Mary Goretti on 
July 7th has been mentioned, since we 
have the privilege to do so. Two 
other more or less radical changes in 
our Office are mentioned on October 
16, October 17 and especially on No- 
vember 26th. The last named in- 



stance calls attention to the fact that 
the Lessons for the Feast of St. 
Leonard of Port Maurice have been 
entirely rearranged. They are now 
identical with the ones used by the 
Franciscan Fathers, to which Order 
St. Leonard belonged. There are 
various hypotheses "extra Urbem" 
why this change was made. These 
new Lessons together with all the 
other changes in our Proprium have 
been printed "pro manuscripto" and 
can be obtained from THE PAS- 
SIONIST. The list of addresses and 
phone numbers in the last part of the 
Ordo is very defective, even after 
adding the "additions and corrections" 
on the inside back cover. Any sug- 
gestions as to corrections and better- 
ment of our Ordo are always wel- 
comed by the compiler. 



"The Apostolic Sign", publication of 
the Seminarians of Holy Cross Pre- 
paratory Seminary, deserves high 
commendation for its September- 
October issue. With it was sent the 
Mission Sunday Program sponsored 
by the Students under the direction of 
Fr. Cletus, the Moderator. Both the 
publication and the program bespeak 
a very active interest in the C.P. 
home and foreign Missions. 



We have received a pamphlet con- 
taining a short sketch of a certain 
Catharine Schwarz. Catharine seems 
to have been one of those chosen souls 
who, in the eyes of the world, cannot 
find her place in the world, yet as a 
matter of fact has found a grand 
place in the plans of God. It seems 
that she was under the spiritual direc- 
tion of one of our Fathers in Sts. 



87 



John and Paul. She went there daily 
to Holy Mass and the little biography 
before us was written with the au- 
thorization of our Superiors. On July 
4th, 1938, she was violently struck by 
a motorcycle. Three months of acute 
suffering followed till she died Sep- 
tember 24th. The pamphlet is written 
in the hope that someday the Church 
will officially recognize the sanctity of 
this woman. 



Father William Joseph, C.P., Lector 
in our Preparatory Seminary, St. 
Louis, appeared in the December 1948 
Homiletic and Pastoral Review with 
an article entitled: "Outstanding Ex- 
ample of the Reparative Character of 
the Night of the Spirit". The ex- 
ample is St. Paul of the Cross. This 
is a translation of a chapter in the 
"Trois Ages" of Fr. Reginald Garri- 
gou-Lagrange, O.P. Readers are also 
aware that the "Trois Ages" is ap- 
pearing in an English translation. 
Lately the second volume came off the 
press, which also contains the chapter 
translated by Fr. William Joseph. 
Herder Book Company is publishing 
the work. 

Congratulations to Fr. Edward 
Guido on the fine little pamphlet "Que 
dice la Biblia". The work is a step 
to counteract the flood of Protestant 
propaganda literature. Much of the 
latter is printed on this side of the 
Rio Grande and with the flush funds 
of our separated brethren is put in a 
most attractive form; whereas most 
of the Catholic Mexican literature ori- 
ginates in Mexico where the proverbi- 
al Catholic poverty cannot meet the 
demands made for fine printing and 
makeup. Father's booklet takes up 



the text of the Protestant Bible and 
proves from it the Catholic Doctrine. 
May there be many followers of Fa- 
ther Edward in this work of trying 
to keep the Mexican population in the 
true fold by effectively offsetting the 
Protestant presentation of untrue doc- 
trine. 

The Catholic Information Society 
which published Fr. Godfrey's "Have 
You Heard Christ's Call" call it an 
evolution in vocational literature. The 
book surely covers the ground and 
with its 90 half-tone illustrations rep- 
resenting the various fields of activity 
offered prospective candidates to the 
priesthood or religious life, gives 
about all that can be given along the 
line of exterior information. The vo- 
cation, of course, the individual must 
have. The pamphlet ought to help 
clear the path of petty obstacles that 
so often stand in the way of a real 
vocation. 

Father Raymond, Director of the 
Confraternity of the Passion in the 
Province of St. Paul of the Cross, is 
having pictures of Bl. Mary Goretti 
made. We are sure that they will be 
acceptable and up to the standards of 
art, etc. 

The December number of THE 
SIGN carries two articles which offer 
abundant help to foster the traditional 
devotion to the Infant Jesus in our 
Congregation. The touching ceremony 
that our Holy Founder introduced be- 
fore Matins on Christmas is well 
known, even if not universally carried 
out. The index to his published let- 
ters contains no less than 30 explicit 
references to Infant Jesus. The 
Servant of God, Father Lawrence of 
St. Francis Xavier, Passionist Pro- 



88 



vincial, composed a devotion in honor 
of the Infant Jesus and Pope Pius IX 
enriched it with Indulgences in 1846. 
This prayer is contained in the 
present Raccolta, number 101. The 
articles of the Sign referred to are: 
"The Christ Child's Bed" and "Christ- 
mas Angels". The latter is by Walter 
Farrel, O.P. 



The September number of the Acta 
Congregationis gives us some inter- 
esting items in its bibliography. Fa- 
ther Gerard, of the Presentation Pro- 
vince, has put out a book of 360 pages 
of mission sermons and notes on same 
for the use of young missionaries just 
entering upon the mission field. Fa- 
ther Gerard was in the mission work 
for forty-three years and in this book 
gives the fruit of his experiences. 
The reviewer says the book is written 
in a clear and simple style and aims 
at being effective on the modern mind. 
— One of our Fathers in Spain had 
the honor of delivering a paper on the 
Theology of the Holy Spirit according 
to the concept of St. Cyril of Alesan- 
dria, during the Spanish Theological 
Week in 1946. The paper is now 
edited in a separate form. — Our Fr. 
Godfrey's three first vocational pam- 
phlets are presented with praise. — The 
English translation of both the No- 
vices Regulations and the Catechism 
of the principal duties of a Passionist 
Religious (St. Paul, Kansas, 1947) 



are given a bit of prominence. The 
remark in the review of the latter 
that some things were added, we are 
told was not meant in a derogatory 
sense. The fact that the "Ejacula- 
tions" were given both in Latin and in 
English and according to both Psalm 
versions is called "peropportune". — 
"You Wouldn't Deny Me That" by Fr. 
Victor Donovan (St. Paul of the Cross 
Province) has found a Dutch trans- 
lator in the person of Fr. Xavier, 
C.P., Province of Our Lady of Holy 
Hope.— The fourth edition of "The 
Saddest and Gladdest of Days" by the 
late Fr. Camillus C.P. (Province of 
St. Paul of the Cross) is also men- 
tioned in the latest Acta C.P. Along- 
side with the mission sermons of Fr. 
Gerard, mentioned above, we have also 
a set of Motives on the Passion by 
Fr. Cornelius of the N. Italy Province. 
— 'The Wisdom of God", a collection 
of articles that appeared in the SIGN 
by Fr. Fidelis Rice (Prov. of St. Paul 
of the Cross) is presented as most 
timely, opposing the mystery of the 
Passion to the false concepts of 
democracy and Communism. — Finally 
our Fr. Nicholas' "With Jesus Suf- 
fering" is mentioned and two Biogra- 
phies of Bl. Mary Goretti. One of the 
latter is written in Dutch by Fr. 
Xavier (Province of Our Lady of 
Holy Hope) the other in Flemish by 
Fr. Hilarion of the Province of St. 
Gabriel. 




89 



WORKS OF MINISTRY 

(The following enumeration does not -pretend to be complete, but all is recorded that has come 
to our notice and has not been published in a former issue of THE PASSIONIST) . 



MISSIONS 



Aug 


30-Sept. 5 


Spring Valley, Wis. 


Sacred Heart 


Fr. Roland 


Sept 


12-19 


Compton, Calif. 


Sacred Heart (Spanish) 


Fr. Edward G. 


Oct. 


3-10 


Eureka, Ks. 


Sacred Heart 


Fr. Terence 






New Trier Minn. 


St. Mary 


Fr. Fidelis 






Chicago, 111. 


St. Malachy 


Fr. Cyril 






Fulda, Ind. 


St. Boniface 


Fr. Valentine 






Crookston, Minn. 


Cathedral 


Fr. Emmanuel 






Strawberry Point, la. 


St.. Mary 


Fr. Martin 






Cincinnati, Ohio 


St. Ignatius 


Fr. Marion 






Lacon, 111. 


Immac. Concept. 


Fr. Francis 






Areata, Calif. 


St. Mary (Italina) 


Fr. Edward 






Yorkville, Ind. 


St. Martin 


Fr. Arnold 






Dubuque, la. 


St. Columkille 


Fr. Alban 


Oct. 


3-17 


Detroit, Mich. 


St. Gregory 


Frs. Roland & 
Theophane 


Oct. 


3-24 


Hamilton, Ks. 


St. John 


Fr. Terence 


Oct. 


10-17 


Cascade, la. 


St. Mary 


Fr. Hilary 






Keokuk, la. 


St. Peter 


Fr. Justin 






El Monte, Calif. 


L. of Gudaluppe 

(Spanish) 


Fr. Alfred Mc. 


Oct. 


10-24 


St. Paul, Minn. 


St. Vincent 


Fr. Kevin 






Louisville, Ky. 


St. Agnes 


Frs. Stanislaus & 
Bertrand 






Rock Island, 111. 


St. Joseph 


Frs. Canute & Ronan 


Oct. 


17-24 


Malvern, Ohio 


St. Francis X. 


Fr. Julius 






Cherry Mound, la. 


St. Pius 


Fr. Conel 






New Ulm, Minn. 


St. George 


Fr. Fidelis 


Oct. 


17-31 


London, Ohio 


St. Patrick 


Fr. Flanon 






Middletown, Ohio 


St. John 


Frs. Marion & 
Arnold 






Des Moines, la. 


Visitation 


Frs. Francis & 






Carney, la. 


St. Michael 


Cyril 


Oct. 


24-31 


Kenyon, Minn. 


St. Michael 


Fr. Paschal 






St. Thomas, Minn. 


St. Thomas 


Fr. Terence 






Ossian, la. 


St. Francis de Sales 


Fr. Martin 


Oct. 


24-Nov. 7 


Ida, Mich. 


St.. Joseph 


Fr. Kilian 






Dundee, Mich. 


St. Irene 


Fr. Kilian 






Owensboro, Ky. 


St. Paul 


Frs. Matthias & 
Gregory 


Oct. 


31 -Nov. 7 


Richland, Minn. 


St. Edward 


Fr. Paschal 






Belpre, Ohio. 


St. Ambrose 


Fr. Daniel 






Coronado, Calif. 


Sacred Heart 


Fr. Edward 






Corning, Ohio. 


St. Bernard 


Fr. Emmanuel 






Center Ridge, Ark. 


St. Joseph 


Fr. Henry 






Bloomington, Calif. 


St. Charles 


Fr. Basil 


Oct. 


81-Nov. 14 


Alexandria, La. 


St. James 


Fr. Cornelius 


Oct 


31-Nov. 21 


Chicago, III. 


Immac. Concept. 


Frs. Stanislaus, 
Canute & Conel 


Nov 


1-7 


Central City, la. 


St. Stephen 


Fr. Ronan 


90 














Nov. 7-14 



Nov. 7-21 



Nov. 7-28 



Nov. 14-21 



Nov. 21-28 



Nov. 28-Dec. 5 



Caney, Ks. 
Batchtown, 111. 
Herrin, 111. 
Osborne, Ks. 
Abbot, Texas 
Marshfield, Wis. 

Osborn, Ohio. 
Lafferty, Ohio 
Chicago, 111. 

Monterey Park, Calif. 

El Campo, Texas 

Taiton 

Faribault, Minn. 
Ord, Nebr. 
Alhambra, Calif. 

Montrose, Mo. 
Todd's Mill, 111. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Waupaca, Wis. 
St. Mar- Ind. 
Hazel Green, Wis. 
Des Moines, la. 
Tipton, Ks. 

St. Peter, Ind. 



Sacred Heart 

St. Barbara 

O.L. of Mt. Carmel 

St. Aloysius 

Immac. Heart 

St. John Bapt. 

Help of Christ. 
St. Mary 
St. Angela 

St. Stephen 

St. Philip 

St. John Nep. 
St. Lawrence 
L. of Perp. Help 
All Souls 

Immac. Concep. 

St. Mary 

St. John Nep. 

St. Mary Magd. 

St. Mary 

St. Francis de Sales 

Christ the King 

St. Aloysius 

St. Peter 



Fr. Terence 
Fr. Leo Patrick 
Fr. Hilary 
Fr. George 
Fr. John Aelred 
Frs. Justin & 

Flannon 
Fr. Cyril 
Fr. Marion 
Frs. Valentine, Roland 

& Timothy 
Frs. Philip &• 

Dunstan 
Frs. Bertrand & 

Cyril 

Fr. Paschal 
Fr. Emmanuel 
Frs. Lambert & 

Basil 
Fr. Terence 
Fr. Hilary 
Fr. Theophane 
Fr. Leo Patrick 
Fr. Gilbert 
Fr. Flannon 
Fr. Justin 
Frs. George & 

Rob. Felix 
Fr. Valentine 



RETREATS TO RELIGIOUS 



Oct. 6-15 
Oct. 16-26 
Nov. 1-10 
Nov. 3-12 
Nov. 12-21 



Nov. 13-20 
Nov. 14-21 
Nov. 17-21 



Nov. 21-29 
Nov. 28-Dec. 2 
Nov. 29-Dec. 8 



Dec. 11-17 



Detroit, Mich. 
Mobile, La. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Omaha, Nebr. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Ponca City, Okl. 
Normandy, Mo. 
Owensboro, Ky. 
Erlanger, Ky. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
New Orleans, La. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Chicago, 111. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
New Orleans, La. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
LaPorte, Texas 



Carmelite Nuns 
Carmelite Nuns 
Carmelite Nuns 
Caremlite Nuns 
Good Shepherd S. 
Good Shepherd S. 
Good Shepherd S. 
Good Shepherd S. 
Carmelite Prep. Sem. 
Good Shepherd S. 
Passionist Nuns 
Passionist Nuns 
Passionist Nuns 
Little Sisters of P. 
Good Shepherd S. 
Little Sisters of P. 
Little Sisters of P. 
Little Sisters of P. 
Little Sisters of P. 
Little Sisters of P. 
Little Sisters of P. 
Ordinandi 



Fr. Kevin 

Fr. Bernard 

Fr. Kevin 

Fr. Joyce 

Fr. Louis 

Fr. Mark 

Fr. Anthony Mah. 

Fr. Joseph 

Fr. Robert Felix 

Fr. Alexis 

Fr. Kevin 

Fr. Alfred 

Fr. Joyce 

Fr. Cornelius 

Fr. Anthony Mah. 

Fr. Stanislaus 

Ft. Kevin 

Fr. Clarence 

Fr. Com! 

Fr. ^ornelius 

Fr. Joyce 

Fr. P«BOh*J 



91 







LAY RETREATS 






Oct. 


1-3 


Owensboro, Ky. 


At. C.P. Nuns 


Fr. 


Alfred 


Oct. 


7-17 


East St. Louis, 111. 


St. Teresa Academy 


Ft. 


Henry 


Oct. 


12-15 


Alhambra, Calif. 


Carmelite Reat. house 


Fr. 


Jerome 


Oct. 


15-17 


Owensboro, Ky. 


At. C.P. Nuns 


Fr. 


Alfred 


Oct. 


22-24 


Ventura, Calif. 


St. Catharine Acad. 


Fr. 


Luc i an 






Los Angeles, Calif. 


Social Service Sisters 


Fr. 


Jerome 


Oct. 


25-26 


Des Moines, la. 


St. Catharine Hall 


Fr. 


Bernard Mary 


Oct. 


25-27 


Frontenac, Minn. 


Villa Maria 


Fr. 


Howard 






St. Paul, Minn. 


Cecilia High 


Frs 


I. Walter & 










Leo Patrick 


Oct. 


28-Nov. 1 


Houston, Tex. 


Nurses St. Jos. Hosp. 


Fr. 


Bertrand 


Nov. 


2-5 


Bakersfield, Calif. 


Gacres High School 


Frs 
J 


;. Roderick & 
erome 


Nov. 


2-6 


Mobile, La. 


Old Folks at Little Ss. 


Fr. 


Anthony Mah 


Nov. 


3-5 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


De laSalle High 


Fr. 


Walter 


Nov. 


5-7 


Alhambra, Calif. 


Carme'.ite Ret. House 


Fr. 


Jerome 






Owensboro, Ky. 


At. C.P. Nuns 


Fr. 


Alfred 


Nov. 


18-22 


Galveston, Tex. 


Nurses, St. m. Infirm. 


Fr. 


John Aelred 


Nov. 


19-21 


Alhambra, Calif. 


Carmelite Ret. House 


Fr. 


Jerome 


Nov. 


21-23 


Detroit, Mich. 


De La Salle High 


Fr. 


Wilfrid 


Nov. 


25-Dec. 1 


Hankinson, N. Dak. 


St. Francis Acad. 


Fr. 


Howard 


Nov. 


26-29 


Westphalia, Ks. 


High School 


Fr. 


Agatho 


Nov. 


26-28 


Alhambra, Calif. 


Carmelite Ret. House 


Fr. 


Roderick 


Dec. 


3-5 


Alhambra, Calif. 


Carmelite Ret. House 


Fr. 


Jerome 


Dec. 


12-15 


Port Arthur, Tex. 


S. Heart School (Colored) 

NOVENAS 


Fr. 


John Aelred 


Oct. 


12-20 


Berlin, Wis. 


St. Michael 


Fr. 


Norbert 


Oct. 


19-28 


National City, Calif. 


St. Jude 


Fr. 


Edward 


Oct. 


20-28 


Detroit, Mich. 


St. Jude 


Fr. 


Boniface 


Oct. 


21-30 


Houston, Texas 


Christ the King 


Fr. 


John Aelred 


Oct. 


30-Dec 7 


Casco, Wis. 


Holy Trinity 


Fr. 


Godfrey 


Nov. 


29-Dec. 8 


Owensboro, Ky. 


St. Paul 


Fr. 


Arnold 






Mobile, Ala. 


Cathedral 


Fr. 


Ralph 






Oak Park, 111. 


St. Catharine 


Fr. 


Walter 






FORTY HOURS 






Sept 


. 12-14 


Plymouth, Mich. 


St. Michael 


Fr. 


Theophane 






Jackson, Mich. 


St. Mary 


Fr. 


Wilfred 


Sept 


. 19-21 


Deer. .eld, Mich. 


St.. Alphonsus 


Fr. 


Theophane 






Detroit, Mich. 


St. Rita 


Fr. 


.Justin 


Sept 


. 26-28 


Monroe, Mich. 


St. Michael 


Fr. 


Linus 






Dearborn, Mich. 


Sacred Heart 


Fr. 


Cyril 


Oct. 


3-5 


Detroit, Mich. 


Holy Rosary 


Fr. 


Linus 






Carleton, Mich. 


St. Patrick 


Fr. 


Mark 






Detroit, Mich. 


St. Gabriel 


Fr. 


Ferdinand 






Battle Creek, Mich. 


St. Philip 


Fr. 


Harold 






Wyandotte, Mich. 


St. Elisabeth 


Fr. 


Linus 


Oct. 


8-10 


Panama, la. 


St. Mary 


Fr. 


Conel 


Oct. 


10-12 


Maloy, la. 


Immac. Concept. 


Fr. 


Malachy 






Red Oak. la. 


St. Mary 


Fr. 


Matthew 






Dun'ap, la. 


St. Patrick 


Fr. 


Louis 






("larkson, Ky. 


Sts. Peter A Paul 


Fr. 


Thomas 






Knotsville, Ky. 


St. Anthony 


Fr. 


Silvius 






H< nshaw, Ky. 


St. Ambrose 


Fr. 


Flannon 



92 



Des Moines, la. 
Starlight, Ky. 
Hawesville, Ky. 
Fairfield, Ky. 
Colfax, la. 
St. Clement, Mo. 
Conception, Mo. 
Earlington, Ky. 
St. Vincent, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Portsmouth, la. 
Brussels, 111. 
Albia, la. 
Des Moines, la. 
Clear Creek, la. 
Churchville, la. 
Lovilia, la. 
South Mound, Ks. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Melrose, la. 
Alhambra, Calif. 
Northville, Mich. 
New Albany, Ind. 
Oskaloosa, la. 
Deaforth, Minn. 
Massena, la. 
Curdsville, Ky. 
Des Moines, la. 
Des Moines, la. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Owensboro, Ky. 
Rockwell, la. 
Carrol, la. 
Bellfiower, Calif. 
Walnut, Ks. 
Louisville, Ky. 



All Saints 

St. John 

Immac. Concep. 

St. Michael 

Immac. Concept. 

St. Clement 

Benedictine Abbey 

Immac. Concept. 

Sacred Heart 

St. Charles B. 

St. Mary 

St. Mary 

St. Mary 

Christ the K. 

Sts. Peter & Paul 

Assumption 

Sts. Peter & Paul 

St. Joseph 

Holy Cross 

St. Patrick 

All Souls 

O. L. of Victory 

St. Mary 

St. Mary 

St. Mary 

St. Patrick 

St. Elisabeth 

St. Cath. Hall 

Cathedral 

St. Gabriel 

Cathedral 

St. Mary 

St. Bernard 
St. Patrick 
St. Brigid 



Fr. Ignatius B. 
Fr. Emmanuel 
Fr. Silvius 
Fr. Thomas 
Fr. Hilary 
Fr. Kevin 
Fr. Stephen 
Fr. Silvius 
Fr. Gilbert 
Fr. Thomas 
Fr. John 
Fr. James 
Fr. Hilary 
Fr. Stephen 
Fr. Louis 
Fr. Ignatius B. 
Fr. Nathaniel 
Fr. Robert Felix 
Fr. Julius 
Fr. Jeremias 
Fr. Roderick 
Fr. Ferdinand 
Fr. Gilbert 
Fr. Nathaniel 
Fr. Ignatius B. 
Fr. Jeremias 
Fr. Gilbert 
Fr. Paulinus 
Fr. Stephen 
Fr. Fidelis 
Fr. Emmanuel 
Fr. Jeremias 
Fr. Canute 
Fr. Dunstan 
Fr. Egbert 
Fr. Camillus 



Alhambra, Calif. 
Alhambra, Calif. 
Altadena, Calif. 
Monterey, Calif. 
St. Louis, Mo. 



TRIDUUMS 

All Souls Convent 
Roman Convent 
St. Elisabeth Conv. 
St. Stephen Conv. 
St. Vincent Orphan. 



Fr. Alfred Mc 

Fr. Philip 

Fr. Roderic 

Fr. Jerome 

Fr. Ernest 



DAYS OF RECOLLECTION 



Battle Creek, Mich. 

Altadena, Calif. 
Sierra Madre, Calif. 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Altadena Calif. 
Duarte. Calif. 



Clergy of Jackson 

Deanery 
St. Elisabeth Parish 
Diocesan Clergy 
Men of Pine Lawn 

Parish 
St. Elisabeth Parish 
Santa Teresita 

(Spanish) 



Fr. Alexis 

Fr. Lucian 

Fr. Damian 

Fr. Ernest 

Vr. Lucian 

Fr. Jerome 



93 



Dec. 


5 


Arcadia, Calif. 


C.Y.O. N. District 


Fr. 


Basil 








Des Moines, la. 


Knights of Columbus 


Ft. 


Hilary 




Dec. 


7 


Burbank, 


Calif. 


Villa Cabrini 


Fr. 


Basil 




Dec. 


12 


St. Louis, 


Mo. 


Men from St. Rose 


Fr. 


Ernest 










CONFERENCES TO SISTERS 








Oct. 


3 


Louisville, 


Ky. 


Loretto Acad. 


Fr. 


Hubert 








Louisville, 


Ky. 


Sts. Mary & Elis. Hosp. 


Fr. 


Hubert 








Louisville, 


Ky. 


St. Joseph's Infirm. 


Fr. 


Camillus 








Louisville, 


Ky. 


Mt. St. Agnes 


Fr. 


Camillus 




Oct. 


6 


Louisville, 


Ky. 


Little Sist. of Poor 


Fr. 


Julius 




Oct. 


12 


Louisville, 


Ky. 


Good Shepherd Sisters 


Fr. 


Julius 




Oct. 


17 


Louisville, 


Ky. 


Sacred Heart Home 


Fr. 


Hubert 








Louisville, 


Ky. 


Mercy Academy 


Fr. 


Hubert 








Louisville, 


Ky. 


Loretto Acad. 


Fr. 


Julius 








Louisville, 


Ky. 


St. Joseph Infirm. 


Fr. 


Hubert 








Louisville, 


Ky. 


Sts. Mary & Elisab. 


Fr. 


Vincent Mar 


y 






Louisville, 


Ky. 


Mt, St. Agnes 


Fr. 


Hubert 




Oct. 


10 


Louisville, 


Ky. 


Little Srs. of Poor 


Fr. 


Julius 




Nov. 


21 


Louisville, 


Ky. 


Mercy Academy 


Fr. 


Julius 








Louisville, 


Ky. 


Sacred Heart Home 


Fr. 


Julius 




Dec. 


5 


Louisville, 


Ky. 


St. Jos. Infirm. 


Fr. 


Julius 








Louisville, 


Ky. 


Mt. St Agnes 


Fr. 


Julius 








Louisville, 


Ky. 


Loretto Academy 


Fr. 


Hubert 








Louisville, 


Ky. 


Sts. Mary &• Elisab. 


Fr. 


Hubert 




Dec. 


8 


Louisville, 


Ky. 


Little Srs. of Poor 


Fr. 


Julius 






"Now we are in the midst of the great triumph of Mary Most Holy, 
but I have not the heart to speak of it, the riches of this Sovereign Lady 
are so great and are such a deep sea of perfection, that only the great 
God Who enriched her with these high treasures, knows them. 

That great wound of love, with which her Most Pure Heart was 
gently wounded from the first instant of her Most Pure Immaculate Con- 
ception, grew so much throughout the course of her most holy life, and 
penetrated so deeply that it brought about the separation of her most 
holy soul from her body. . . . You can rejoice in the great Heart of Jesus 
over the glory of Mary Most Holy, loving her with the Most Pure Heart 
of her Divine Son: and if Jesus give you permission take flight to the 
Most Pure Heart of Mary and exult with her, rejoicing that her great 
pains and sorrows are over." 

Lettere Vol. I. p. 349 



94 



WHO IS WHO AND WHERE 



ROME 

Malcolm 1 
Roger 

CHICAGO 

James Patrick 2 

Joseph 3 

Neil 4 

Herman 5 

Kilian 7 

Cyril M 

Augustine 

David K 

J. Philip 

Vincent X 

Norbert 

Alban 

Richard 9 

Matthias 

Conrad 12 

Joseph M 13 

Alan 40 

Kenneth 

Donald 10 

Gordian 18 

Howard 17 

Benet 

Barnabas Mary 19 

Paul F 10 

Wm. Gail 14 

Leo Patrick 

Godfrey 

Students 

Melvin 

Emmet 

Kent 

Kenan 

Ward 

Bernardine 

Vena id 

Caspar 

Benedict Joseph 

John Mary 

Peter Claver 

Luke 

Clement 

Dominic 

Brothers 

Joseph 2] 

Leo 28 



HOLY CROSS 
CINCINNATI 

Valentine 5 

Colum 7 

Aurelius 

Alphonsus 

Edwin 27 

Raphael 

Bernard 

Arthur 9 

Timothy 

Sylvester 

Nicholas 15 

Claude 

Daniel 

Joyce 

Leopold 

Kenny 9 

Quentin 

Charles G. 25 

Thaddeus 10 

Brothers 

Anthony 21. 22 
William 24 

LOUISVILLE 

Julius 5 

Emmanuel 7 

Isidore 

Adalbert 

Charles 

Lawrence 

Anselm 9 

Andrew 

Maurice 29 

Thomas 

Gilbert 39 

Hubert 42 

Marion 

Camillus 41 

Austin 

Arnold 

Silvius 

Alfred 

Vincent M 16 

Cormac 10 

Flannon 

Campion 

John Bapt. 

Noel 

Forrest 



PROVINCE, DECEMBER 1948 



Keith 

Raymond 

Fergus 

Deacons 

Jordan 

Owen 

Rene 

Warren 

Columban 

Alvin 

In Minor Ord. 

Carrol 

Randal 

Firmian 

Clyde 

Loran 

Simon 

Brothers 

Luke 23, 24 
Gabriel 31 
Casimir 22 
Denis 21 

ST. LOUIS 

Kyran 5 
Walter 7 
Celestine 44 
Herbert 45 
Kevin 
Edgar 45 
Ervan 45 
Anthony Mah. 
Regis 45 
Elmer 45 
Ernest 45 
Germain 45 
Cyprian 45 
James 45 
William Jos 45 
Emil 45 
Cronan 45 
Roch 39 
Leon 45 

Brothers 

James 43 
Bernard 21 
Conrad 24 
Regit 22, 21 

I lav id 23 



ST. PAUL 


Matthew V 39 


Robert Felix 5 
Faustinus 6 
Egbert 7 
Matthew M 
Hyacinth 
Julian 
Edward 


Nathaniel 
Ignatius B 35 
Ronan 

Thomas More 3 
John 37 
Stephen 38 

Students 


George 


Paul Mary 


Agatho 


Augustine Paul 


Christopher 9 


Joachim 


Brendan 


Bede 


Cyprian F. 9 


Barry 


Henry 


J. Francis 


Paschal 


Marvin 


Miles 10 


Victor 


Joel 11 


Gail 


Brothers 

Louis 24 
Philip 21 
John 22, 31 


Aquinas 
J. Gabriel 
Myron 
Denis 
Albert 


Novices 

Francis Martin 


Eugene 
Meinrad 


Michael Joseph 

Carl Anthony 

Jude 

Justin Mary 


Bruce 

Berchmans 

Rian 

Brothers 


Sebastian x 


Romuald 23 


Bro. Novices 

Thomas 
George 

Postulant 

Paul 


Columban 22, 31 
Felix 
Theodore 21 

DETROIT 

Clarence 5 
Wilfred 7 


DES MOINES 


Benedict 
David Ferl 


Bernard Mary 5 


Alexis 


Canute 7 


Justin 


Ignatius 


Gerald 


Louis 


Linus 


Malachy 


Boniface 


Martin 


Gerard 


Hilary 


Mark 


Paulinus 


Urban 


Peter 


Ferdinand 


Jeremias 


Roland 


Robert 32 


l'idt lis 


Conell 


Patrick 9 v 



05 



Theophane 


Roderick 


Ludger 


CHINA 


Nilus 
Cyril Jab 
Bartholomew 27 
Harold 


Jerome 
Isidore R 25 
Lucian 
Alfred MC 


Canisius 
Mel 

FAIRFIELD 


Anthony Mai. 
William W 20 
Cyprian L 20 
James L'bt 20 


Declan 25 


Brothers 


Edmund 


Francis Fl 20 


Brothers 


Richard 22 




Harold Trav 20 


Aloysius 21 


Gerald 24 


SA'MENTO 


Carl 26 


Gilbert 22 


Patrick 21 


An gel o 8 


Paul 26 


SIERRA MADRE 

Lambert 5 


BIRMINGHAM 


Gabriel 
Pius 


UNIVERSITY 

Gregory Jos 28 


Dunstan 7 
Reginald 
Leo 9 


Ralph 8 
Cornelius 
Gregory Mc 


HOUSTON 

Aloysius 8 


Frederick 28 

CHAPLAINS 


Basil 


Terrence 


Stanislaus 


Fabian 


Philip 


Brice 


Bertrand 


Leonard 


Aidan 


Bro. Henry 33 


John Aelred 


Xavier 


Ed. Guido 




Conleth 25 


Brian 


Damian 27 


ENSLEY 


Bro. Daniel 33 


Nicholas G. 


Finan 10 


Eustace 8 







REFERENCES 



First Gen. Consultor SS. Giovanni e Paolo 24. 

Rome (147), Italy 25. 

Provincial 26. 

I Consultor 27. 

II Consultor 28. 
Rector 29. 
Master of Novices 30. 
Vicar 31, 
Superior 32. 
Pastor 33. 
Assistant 34. 
Vice Master 35. 
Lector of Church History 36. 
Lector of I and II Dogma Passion 37. 
Chaplain at Dunning 33. 
Chaplain for Passionist Nuns 

Lector of Can. Law, Liturgy and Chant. 39. 

Director of Girls' Vocational Club 40. 

Provincial Secretary 41. 

Lector of Scripture I and II 

Catholic Mission 42. 
Passionist Fathers, Yuanling, Hunan 

China 43. 

Cook 44. 

Tailor, Inflrmarian 45. 

Refectorian 



Outside Brothers 

Director of Retreatants 

in U.S.A. 

Retreat Master 

Montreal 

Lector of S. Eloquence 

Retreat Organizer 

Porter 

Lector of History 

All around Brother 

Lector of English, Phil. II. 

Lector of Phil. I; Hist, of Phil. II 

Lector of Phil. Ill 

Lector of Hist, of Phil. I ; S. Passion ; 

Public Speaking 

Director 

Sign Fieldman 

Lector of Scripture III and IV Passion 

IH and IV 

Lector of Moral, Pastoral Theol. and 

Catechetics. Asceticism. 

Assistant Cook 

Chnplain at St. Vincent's 

Lector 



96 



Obtainable friQHt, 



1) Office of St. Gemma 

2) Mass of St. Gemma 

3) Additiones et Variationes in Officiis Propriis Congregationis 

4) Bound Passionist Bulletin No. 19 to 28 

5) "God's own Method" by Fr. Aloysius 

6) Catechism of the Principal Duties of a Passionist Religious 

7) Regulations of the Passionist Novice ' 

8) Order to be observed by Choir At High or Solemn Mass • 

! 

9) "A Retreat Souvenir" by Fr. Victor, C.P., translated by Fr. j 

Edmund, C.P. ' 

I 
10) Mary's Cavalier, St. Gabriel, by Fr. Osmund, C.P. 5 

i i 

j 11) St. Gemma Galgani, by Fr. Osmund, C.P. j 



12) Dominic Barbari by Fr. Osmund, C.P. 

13) The Love of Mary by D. Roberto. St. Gabriel's favorite book. 

14) Pictures of Bl. Mary Goretti. 



Tr>e- 
ASS10NIST 

ULLETIN of HOLY CROSS PROVINCE 





No. 2 



MARCH-APRIL, 1949 
FEAST OF THE FIVE WOUNDS 



THE PASSIONIST 

Bulletin of Holy Cross Province 
VoL "' No ' 2 March-April, 19491 



T P « bl ^ hed ^ im ? nthl y at #e Sacred Heart Retreat, 1924 Newburg Road, Louisville 5 Kv USA 
Iff^w^f Janua 7' Ma ™ h ' Ma ^ Ju 'y. September and November FTanced by free wHl") 
m^nusSptoT readerS ' Th6re iS n ° C ^^. The paper is a private publication "pr"! 



IN THIS ISSUE 

Editorial 97 Province of St. Paul 172 

Vox Patris 100 Spain 176 

Passionist and Prayer 102 Province of St. Gabriel 180 

Ere 106 Africa 182 

Sorrows of Mary 112 Province of Holy Cross 187 

Ius Particulare 116 Passionist Nuns 201 

Passionist Customs 118 Passionist Sisters 203 

Missionary Forum 120 Varia 205 

Followers of the Crucified 129 Works of Ministry 208 

General Curia 171 Who is Who 214 



"The Passionist" aims at a deeper knowledge of the purpose of our Congregation and at a 
closer attainment of said purpose. Cooperation is invited. Consequently, contributions by any 
member of the Congregation along the lines of news, past or present, of general or provincial 
interest; articles dogmatic, ascetical, canonical or of historical value for us, are welcome. Also 
photographs of recent or historic C.P. events are helpful towards the ideal "The Passionist" 
strives to reach. Especially at present does "The Passionist" wish to establish and conduct the 

Missinnnrv TtYinim 



Gaito'iial 



The "Lenten Work of Passionist 
Missionaries" posted on the bul- 
letin boards of the Retreats in our 
Province tells us that God has 
blessed us with work during the 
Holy Season. Work is being done 
in 17 out of the possible 30 States 
that make up our Province, plus 
some work in Canada. Some 96 
appointments are distributed a- 
mong 51 Missionaries, which means 
an average of almost two appoint- 
ments for every man. The figure 
51 may look a bit scanty when 
placed aside the figure 191, which 




is the total of professed Fathers 
in the Province. At first sight, 
this comparison of figures may 
seem to contradict the assertion 
that God has blessed us with work ; 
however a few considerations will 
show that we are really engaged 
to our capacity. First of all, the 
work of the Retreats in California 
is not enumerated in the list, 
whereas the members of said Re- 
treats are counted in the number 
191. Then there are some 25 Lec- 
tors whose teaching prevents them 
from participating in the works of 

97 



the ministry. Furthermore there 
are those offices that demand con- 
stant presence, and thus forbid 
Mission work; e.g., Lay Retreat 
Masters and Directors, Pastors and 
Assistants, Resident Chaplains, etc. 
Finally, we may not forget the 
venerable men who have already 
sacrificed their strength, we might 
say their very blood, in the field 
and now are in enforced retire- 
ment from action. 

This consideration encourages 
one to heartily approve the stand 
taken by the Missionary Confer- 
ence on "advertising for mission 
work." Advertising, in the ety- 
mological sense, means calling at- 
tention to some fact. Understood 
in this manner, advertising is 
something positively good, it is 
helping others to some new truth. 
In this sense, our mission work can 
be called advertising the Passion 
of Our Lord. Similar to this is 
the advertisement of the Heavenly 
Father Himself: "This is my well 
beloved Son . . , hear ye Him"; and 
that of Our Divine Saviour: "I 
am the way, and the truth, and 
the life . . . Follow me." 

It was in this sense that the 
Missionary Conference recommend- 
ed a "discreet publicity" about our 
Congregation, its work, its history 
and spirit. Thus calling attention 
to our life of prayer and penance, 
in as far as it actually is such at 
present, is very much in place, 
since prayer and penance are the 
98 



big means of bringing God ! 
grace to souls. Our fourth voi 
and, in consequence of it, our dail 
prayers for the missionaries, coul 
be made a big point in our "ac 
vertising." In this connection, al 
tention could also be called to tb 
sacrificial lives and prayers of ou 
Nuns who by Rule pray for th 
success of the Passionist Missions 
Moreover attention could be cen 
tered on the fact that, by vocatior 
we give Missions and Retreats, an. 
consequently are specialists in thi 
line. In addition, we could ver.i 
laudably "advertise" the mission- 
ary career of our Holy Founde: 
as well as our history as a Mis 
sionary Congregation. 

Besides the use of the printer 

word we could profitably and shouk 

advertise our missions by our con 

duct when out of the Retreat, e.g. 

when out for the so oft debatec 

"Sunday Work." Conduct speaks 

louder than the printed word. Or 

Sunday Work we can preach the 

Passion by word, in the Confess 

sional and on the pulpit, and by, 

action, in our observance of a 

spirit of mortification as regards 

reading matter, relations with the 

laity, conversation, preparation and 

thanksgiving for Mass. To belie 

in our private conduct what has 

been printed about us and our mode- 

of life, even in articles and books 

of a very late date, is certainly 

not profitable advertisement for: 

our missions. We are described in 



the printed word as being real 
men of God; if our lives contra- 
iict this description, then we nulli- 
fy the effect of literary advertise- 
ment, we harm the mission cause, 
and do anything but "promote" 
our work. 

The Conference disapproved any 
method of advertising the mis- 
sions that might smack of "high- 
powered salesmanship." High-pow- 
ered salesmanship means nothing 
else than lying. Such a lie would 
be the presentation of a fictitious 
picture of our actual manner of 
living, or the presentation of our 
work in a purely natural light, as 
if a mission were not a work seek- 
ing the purely supernatural good 
of souls. High-powered salesman- 
ship may also lead to deprecating 
some or all missionary effort and 
success of other organizations. 
Pride, in the theological sense, is 
just as evil for a moral body as 
for a private individual. High- 
powered salesmanship may also be 
recognized by the motivation; e.g., 
to acquire material gain, to "get 
work," to "get out." 

Human nature being as it is, 
the temptation to "high-powered 
salesmanship" is great, and that is 
probably the reason why the Con- 



ference "unanimously rejected" the 
idea of having fieldmen to solicit 
missions. If the Conference could 
have had the assurance that the 
fieldman would always be a man 
of God, guided by supernatural 
motives and ever remaining within 
the bounds of truth and discretion, 
it might have greeted the idea of 
sending such a man on the road to 
persuade pastors of the utility, if 
not necessity, of a mission in their 
respective parishes. After all, even 
our Lord had a St. John the Bap- 
tist, and sent a Star to announce 
his birth. 

Also here: "Verba movent, ex- 
empla trahunt" remains true. "Dis- 
creet publicity of our work" is a 
natural means and to be recom- 
mended, but it will do no more than 
move the rational man to find out 
for himself if the "advertisement" 
tallies with the actual facts. 

The big Lenten schedule leads 
us to believe that we need no high- 
powered salesmanship; God has 
sent us work without it, and we 
confidently hope that He will con- 
tinue to do so in the future in 
view of our own cooperation with 
His grace in actually living up to 
our high calling in and out of 
the Retreat. 



Vst*u£*}/ % vy , <?.P 



99 




o 




PAUL OF THE CROSS, Superior 
General: V. Rev. Frs. General 
Consultors, Provincials, and Rectors 
of the Congregation of the Discalced 
Clerics of the Passion of Our Lord 
Jesus Christ, Greetings in the Lord. 
Dearly beloved Fathers and 
Brothers in the Lord. After pros- 
trating humbly at the feet of Jesus 
Crucified and pouring forth cease- 
less prayers we are led to antici- 
pate the General Chapter by a 
whole year. We judge this oppor- 
tune, even necessary, due to diverse 
serious circumstances on which 
the spiritual and temporal useful- 
ness and progress of this nascent 
Congregation greatly depend. 
Wherefore, after discussing the 
matter and viewing it from every 
angle, with the consent and coun- 
sel of our General Consultors and 
the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, 



we declare the General Chapter to 
be held on the coming 22nd of 
February, 1758. 

And so we command the General! 
Consultors, Provincials, and Rec- 
tors in virtue of Holy Obedience 
to be present for the Sacred Tridu- 
um in the presence of the Bl. Sac- 
rament which will begin in this 
Retreat of San Angelo on February 
19th. After this is over and the 
Mass of the Holy Spirit has been 
solemnly celebrated and the usual 
Procession completed, we will open 
the General Chapter, God willing, 
on the 22nd day of the month. 

That everything may have a 
successful outcome we order the 
Rectors before they leave to com- 
mand a triduum of supplication 
before the Bl. Sacrament exposed 
for public veneration on the days 



100 



mentioned above in order to im- 
plore the Divine aid for such an 
important matter. Nor should they 
neglect to advise and order that 
on February 22nd, the Conventual 
Mass be a Votive Mass of the 
Holy Spirit celebrated for our in- 
tention. 

Moreover we order each and 
every Rector to bring with them 
a sum of money according to the 
Constitutions — Ch. 32 — which was 
prescribed by letters from our pro- 
secretary. This is to pay the bills 
which this retreat, heavily bur- 
dened by community expenses and 
building must meet. They are also 
to bring a faithful and honest re- 
port of the state of their respec- 
tive communities and a list or in- 
dex of the Priests and Clerics and 



Lay-Brothers that make up their 
community. 

We entreat those Capitulars who 
live far from this Retreat to start 
their journey after the distribution 
of Ashes on Ash Wednesday so 
that they may opportunely arrive 
here on the day set above. Finally 
we ask the help of your prayers, 
and begging abundant gifts of 
heavenly graces for each and every 
one of you, we give you our blessing 
in the Lord. 

Given in this Holy Retreat of 
San Angelo, Nov. 18, 1757 

General 

Joseph Hyacinth of St. Catherine 
of Siena, Pro-Secretary 



This letter announces the third General Chapter to be held Feb. 22, 1758, anticipating the 
regular date by a whole year. Our Holy Founder mentions "serious circumstances" which 
made him convoke the Chapter early but none of the histories of the Congregation record any- 
thing requiring one. In his letter of acceptance when he was re-elected in spite of himself 
he said his reason for calling the Chapter was because of the "lively desire I have of retiring 
to the profound solitude of one of our Retreats, in order to think only of staying at the feet 
of the Sacramental Jesus to bewail my faults day and night, and to prepare myself in aratione 
et ieiunio, in silentio, et in spe for a holy death." (P. 258) The original of this letter of 
convocation is in Latin. 



"I have had to study the life of Blessed Paul (of the Cross) to 
preach his panegyric, and I do not think the life of any Saint ever struck 
my soul so much. I think him one of the clearest and most perfect of 
spiritual directors. He wonderfully combined the perfections of many 
Saints in himself — for example, those of St. Peter of Alcantara and of 
St. Francis. ... I had not the least notion we had such a Saint in 
these latter times." 

Letters of Bishop Ullathorne, p. 44. 



101 



Semper Orate 



A Passionist and Prayer 

REQUISITES FOR A LIFE OF PRAYER 



I N our last article we pointed out 
' that for a Passionist the very- 
core of the interior life is his 
prayer; that it is the spearhead 
of his whole spiritual life. In this 
article we would like to show what 
our Holy Founder considered to 
be the requisite for leading a life 
of prayer. 

In the first place we must realize 
that our prayer life is not entirely 
independent of the rest of our life. 
Rather it is the interior expression 
of our whole life before God. It is 
the soul seeking to surrender the 
whole of its life to God. Hence our 
conduct throughout the day has a 
tremendous influence on our 
prayer. 

Our Holy Founder gives us a 
wonderful piece of advice in the 
regulations that he left us, when 
in the chapter on mental prayer 
he says: "Let all remember that 
they will never succeed in the ex- 
ercise of mental prayer, nor will 
it produce in them any satisfac- 
tory fruit, unless they endeavor 
with all diligence, a) to be recol- 
lected during the day in the pres- 
ence of God; b) to be lovers of 
solitude; c) to practice interior 
and exterior mortification; d) to 
observe with exactness even the 

102 



smallest precepts of the Holy Rule." 
These words that have come 
down to us from the first Regula- 
tions, composed by our Holy 
Founder, sum up much of what he 
had expressed times without num- 
ber in his conferences and in his 
letters of spiritual direction. Let 
us take up these points one by one. 

One of his religious stated at 
the processes: ''There is nothing 
that the servant of God inculcated 
more forcefully than the remem- 
brance of the presence of God. I 
believe that God raised up our ven- 
erable Father in order to teach 
us in these times this divine science 
of seeking God with purity of 
faith in the interior of our souls. 
Each time I had a spiritual con- 
ference with him, he would return 
to this point. The expressions 
would vary, but the substance 
would be always the same." 

"Remain in the Divine Presence 
amid all your occupations." "Make 
frequent ejaculations in the midst 
of your work, when going through 
the city, when on a journey, etc.," 
is his frequent advice. 

"In his circular letter for the 
feast of Pentecost, 1750, he wrote: 
"Direct all your zeal to this end : 



to be recollected in interior soli- 
tude." 

"It is of faith," he used to say, 
"that our soul is the temple of the 
living God. It is of faith that God 
dwells in us. Therefore enter with- 
in yourself; there adore the Most 
High in spirit and truth; there 
speak to Him of His sufferings, 
of His love for us. You are closer 
to Him than you are to your own 
skin. So speak to Him from your 
heart. Love Him and cast your- 
self into His divine arms. Rest 
there, burning with holy love. . ." 

Such quotations can not only be 
counted by the score, but even 
multiplied by the score! Our Holy 
Founder urged his religious to rec- 
ollection almost as though it were 
the very end of the spiritual life. 
To Him it was synonymous with 
the practice of the love of God. 

"To be lovers of solitude" . . . 
this is one of the special character- 
istics of our congregation. All re- 
ligious, all spiritual persons are 
called to a life of prayer. But 
many of them, by their very voca- 
tion are expected to carry on this 
life of prayer in the market place, 
or the college, or the parish, or 
on the busy crossroads of life. But 
our prayer life is to be carried on 
principally in solitude. 

By solitude our Holy Founder 
meant first of all exterior solitude, 
—freedom from the distractions of 
the world and unnecessary contact 
with seculars. Then he meant ac- 



tual silence. And finally he meant 
interior solitude or interior de- 
tachment from creatures. This can 
be shown by numerous quotations. 

In a letter announcing his third 
election as superior general, he 
writes : "Let the brethren of the 
congregation flee conversation not 
strictly necessary with seculars, as 
the ruination of devotion that they 
may guard their senses, in order 
more easily to have interior soli- 
tude, recollection of heart and a 
mind always turned towards God 
thru prayer." 

"In order to remain in the fer- 
vor of holy prayer, in order to 
increase in divine love and the 
knowledge of divine things, the 
solitude of your cell, of your room, 
is very necessary. Likewise you 
must converse with others, even 
those of the house, as little as 
possible, except when there is a 
real necessity." 

"If you would receive the gift 
of prayer, remain in silence." This 
is a saying of his that occurs 
frequently. 

But external solitude and bodily 
silence are simply means to in- 
terior solitude ; a preparation of 
soul that enables it to turn with 
interior freedom to God. "Bodily 
solitude is good, when accompan- 
ied by virtue and prayer; but soli- 
tude of the mind is better. This 
consists in that interior desert in 
which the soul is engulfed in God." 

Our Holy Founder wished us to 



103 



strive to keep our soul habitually 
in this state of interior solitude 
wherein the soul enjoys interior 
peace and recollection of soul with 
God. "If you wish God to work 
wonders in your soul, you ought to 
keep yourself as much as possible 
detached from all creatures, in true 
poverty of spirit and in perfect 
interior solitude." 

A great help, — and indeed an 
absolute necessity for obtaining 
interior quiet of soul is mortifica- 
tion. This is the third requisite 
that our Holy Founder points out 
to us for making progress in the 
ways of prayer. 

"The important thing is," he 
says, "that we shall never become 
men of great prayer and arrive at 
union with God, if we do not have 
a great love for mortification, both 
interior and exterior, practicing it 
as long as we live, whenever oc- 
casions offer themselves. In this 
way, by being entirely centered in 
our interior we shall taste in its 
source how sweet is the Lord." 

To his religious of the retreat 
of Terracina, he wrote : "We have 
always insisted especially on true 
humility of heart and on interior 
and exterior mortification which 
are the foundation stones of the 
spiritual life." 

The reason why this mortifica- 
tion is so necessary, is that the 
soul may gain control over the pas- 
sions; so that the interior of the 
soul be not disturbed by the tem- 



pestuous winds of inordinate de- 
sires and ill-controled emotions.i 
That is why the novices are taught, 
as soon as they enter the monas- 
tery, "to restrain their eyes, their 
tongue and other senses, in order 
that they may the more easily ob- 
tain internal tranquility of soul; 
and, being released from all inor- 
dinate affections, they may freely* 
elevate their mind to divinei 
things." (Ru. 44) And for the; 
same reason we are told that we 
have need of corporal austerity, as 
a powerful aid for raising the 
mind to God. (Ru. 146) 

Lastly, our Holy Founder tells 
us that we will never succeed in 
the exercise of prayer unless we: 
strive with all diligence to observe: 
with exactness even the smallest! 
precepts of the Holy Rule. The: 
reason is evident. It was precisely; 
for this end that our rule was ; 
drawn up. All our rules are so: 
many directives, helps, guides, to: 
lead us to and to preserve us in ai 
spirit of prayer and union with. 
God. They are the directives of ai 
great spiritual master leading his 
disciples to the love of God through 
a life of prayer. The solitude pre- 
scribed by our rule, for example, 
is not an end in itself, but it isi 
to be a help, — and one of our big- 
gest helps to a life of prayer. The 
same may be said of the rule of 
silence. Our poverty is not an end 
in itself, but it is to free the mind 
from the distractions and the at- 



104 



tractions of material goods, — in 
order to leave the mind free to turn 
to God in recollection. Our horari- 
um is drawn up in such a fashion 
as to enable the soul to remain 
as constantly united to God as 
possible. The solitary walk which 
the rule grants two times a day 
was ordained, as was stated in the 
original rule, "for the repose of 
the mind, so as to be more fit for 
prayer." The arrangements of the 
hours of the Divine Office, the a- 
mount of time assigned to mental 
prayer, the frequent exhortations 
to recollection, all these things 
were put into the rule to enable 
the soul to preserve the spirit of 
recollection and prayer. Hence to 
neglect even the smallest precepts 
of the rule is to neglect so many 
helps for the life of prayer. 

Moreover there is this considera- 
tion: our rules, — even the smallest 
of them, — are God's will for us. 
And that is the object of prayer: 
the union of our soul with God ; 
the union of our will with His. 
Our Holy Founder, as well as St. 
Teresa of Avila and St. John of 
the Cross point out that this is 
the grand object of our prayer 
life. St. John of the Cross says: 
(Ascent II, c. 5, 3) "That the soul 
has the greatest communion with 
God which is most advanced in 



love, that is, whose will is most 
conformed to the will of God." 
Hence we see that one who fre- 
quently deliberately breaks his rule 
is simply denying by his actions 
that which he is seeking during 
prayer. And that is why St. Paul 
tells us that to succeed in prayer 
we must live out our prayer in 
our rules. 

In the above we have given but 
a few quotations expressing the 
mind of our Holy Founder on the 
kind of life he expects us to lead 
and on the requisites for success 
in our interior life. Many more 
quotations could be given, but for 
want of space we must confine our- 
selves to only a few. But as one 
thoughtfully reads them over, one 
cannot escape a necessary conclu- 
sion on the nature of the life he 
really wants us to lead. An exact 
observance of our rule, a life of 
retirement from the world, a life 
of interior solitude and detach- 
ment, the frequent, — and eventual- 
ly, habitual, — positive turning of 
the soul to God, — all in the en- 
deavor to obtain a great love for 
God. That is our vocation, as he 
conceived it. That was the first 
idea with which God inspired him : 
"to bring together men who should 
be detached from all creatures in 
order to be united to God." 




105 



Passionists International 



ERE 



IN 1840, the Passionists did not 
yet have one house outside Italy. 
Venerable Father Dominic was 
destined by God to be the founder 
of the first Retreat abroad. 

Here is how events transpired: 
Our Holy Founder had prayed 
much for the conversion of North- 
western Europe, and especially for 
the return of England to the Cath- 
olic Church; of England, which 
had once merited the beautiful 
title: Land of Saints. 

Paul of the Cross did not realize 
during his lifetime his desire to 
send his religious to that country. 
After his death, he left his apos- 
tolic zeal, as a precious heritage, 
to his children. 

Venerable Father Dominic, how- 
ever, was especially consumed with 
the desire to devote himself to the 
conversion of Protestant England. 
Having heard it spoken of a pro- 
jected foundation in Belgium (from 
whence entry could later be made 
into England), he left no stone 
unturned to be one of those chosen 
for the foundation. 

Who was this Father Dominic? 

A Campagnard, twenty-two years 
old, one day presented himself be- 
fore the Passionist Fathers and 
asked to be admitted into their 
Congregation. Since he had not 



completed any formal studies, h« 
was accepted as a lay-brother. Yei 
he himself felt he was called to b« 
a priest and missionary, and ever 
knew that his desire would oiu 
day be realized, while yet beinj 
ignorant as to how it would come 
about. 

Hardly had he entered the mon 
astery than his Superiors recog 
nized in him an intelligence sc 
extraordinary that they permittee 
him to make his novitiate as 
cleric, despite his advanced agej 
Succeeding events proved the fore 
sight of his Superiors in hii 
regard. 

Accordingly Dominic made rapie 
progress in the sciences, especial^ 
in theology. He became not onl; 
an outstanding missionary, but 
writer of rare talent as well. Dur 
ing his thirty years of missionary 
labors, a number of his writing! 
stood in high repute, as for ex 
ample his refutation of the systen 
of Lammenais, still in vogue at th< 
time even among certain Catholics 

During his sojourn in our mon 
astery of Sts. John and Paul a 
Rome, Dominic had been corres 
ponding with a number of eminen 
Englishmen. Among them was th< 
Protestant, Lord Spencer, who wa 
later converted to Catholicity an< 



106 



? * * F/ ' „ 



•******/ 






K 



Three views of the Passionist Retreat at Ere, Belgium. (Above) General view 
of the Retreat. (Below) Interior views showing the beautiful Choir Altar, 
and the imposing Altar and Sanctuary in the Church. 




became a Passionist under the 
name of Father Ignatius of St. 
Paul. 

After his conversion, Spencer 
ardently desired the return of Eng- 
land to Mother Church. He even 
requested Father General to give 
him missionaries for his father- 
land, but since the time was not 
ripe for the realization of this 
project, Spencer began to consider 
a foundation at Lille in the north 
of France, from which entry into 
England could more easily be made. 
A French priest, a friend of Spen- 
cer, took steps in this regard, but 
there were no hopes of success 
even there. There remained only 
Catholic Belgium, land of hospi- 
tality par excellence. 

Shortly afterward, a country 
house was founded at Ere near 
Tournai, not far from Lille, be- 
longing to a certain Baroness 
Croeser, who was favorably dis- 
posed to deeding it for a founda- 
tion. Having obtained the appro- 
bation of the local Ordinary, word 
was sent to Very Rev. Fr. General 
at Rome, and a request made for 
several religious. Since, at that 
time, there were no Belgian re- 
ligious at hand, the choice of a 
personnel for the foundation from 
foreign members was a difficult 
and delicate problem. No one had 
ever dreamed of Father Dominic 
who had recently been elected Pro- 
vincial. He knew, nevertheless, 
that they would not depart without 



him. He had even said confiden- 
tially to one of his confreres: TheJ 
Fathers are already chosen for Bel- 
gium, but they have not yet left, 
and will not leave without me. And 
events turned out as Father Dom- 
inic had predicted. 

Great was his joy when he| 
learned of his nomination, for Bel- 
gium would become for him a step- 1 
ping-stone to England where hei 
had desired to go for the pastj 
twenty years, and whose conver- 
sion he had so much at heart. 

Dominic, returning home after 
a long and tiresome mission, a 
prey to several maladies, on learn- 
ing the good news, was overcome 
with joy, and declared himself! 
ready to depart on the morrow. 
But his companions objected : "You 
should rather be entering a hospital 
for incurables, and now you wish 
to undertake this long and tiring:] 
journey!" They even tried to per-! 
suade Father General to keep back' 
Father Dominic. But he, falling,, 
on his knees, tearfully besought'! 
his superior to uphold his decision, 
attributing the objections of his: 
companions to their too great 
charity in his regard. The favour 
was granted and Father Dominic, 
forgetting fatigue and illness, pre- 
pared to depart as soon as possible. 

The first span of the journey 
was made on horseback, and began 
on May 24th, 1840. The sufferings 
which this part of the voyage 
caused Father Dominic were suchi 



108 



that tears flowed from his eyes 
betimes. Anyone else would have 
abandoned the journey. Only a 
saint could go ahead. Father Dom- 
inic was accompanied by Fathers 
Peter of St. Joseph, Seraphim of 
the Sacred Heart of Jesus, and 
Brother Crispin of the Most Holy 
Virgin. 

The remainder of the voyage 
was made by boat. They sailed 
from Civitavecchia to Marseille, 
from Marseille to Lille in northern 
France, where they arrived June 
9th. There they rested for several 
days before entering Belgium. 

At Ere, where was located the 
house so generously offered by 
Mme. de Croeser, nothing was in 
readiness to receive the religious, 
for no one had imagined they would 
come so soon. They then asked 
hospitality of the Brothers of 
Charity at Troidmont, a short dis- 
tance away, who received them 
with open arms. 

On June 22nd, they took definite 
possession of their new Retreat at 
Ere, where, a few days later, they 
began the day and nightly ob- 
servance, despite the smallness of 
their number. 

Less than two months after their 
arrival, God sent them a great 
trial. Good Brother Crispin left 
earth for heaven. 

In the meantime, Father Dom- 
inic had gone to the Nuncio, Mgr. 
Pecci, the future Pope Leo XIII, 
in order to acquaint him with the 



arrival of the Passionists in Bel- 
gium. The Nuncio received him 
with great kindness, and promised 
to assist the missionaries with all 
his power. 

When later he became Pope, Leo 
XIII, in an audience to several 
Passionist Fathers, spoke highly 
of Father Dominic whom he had 
known, and repeated again and a- 
gain that he was a veritable saint. 

Shortly afterwards, Father Dom- 
inic won the veneration and esteem 
of Mgr. Labis, Bishop of the dio- 
cese of Tournai, of which Ere 
formed a part. Father Dominic 
asked for jurisdiction to preach 
and hear confessions. The Bishop 
accordingly had him undergo an 
examination in theology. The Vicar 
General, assisted by a number of 
professors from the major sem- 
inary, were commissioned to pro- 
ceed to a minute examination. 

The three Fathers, Peter, Sera- 
phim, and Dominic were thus ex- 
amined very thoroughly. When 
Dominic's turn came, he answered 
with such clarity and conciseness 
that after a while the Vicar Gen- 
eral, very much amazed, exclaimed : 
"Fathers, we are here before a 
master who ought to be teaching 
us;" ever afterwards, the Vicar 
General often had recourse to Fa- 
ther Dominic for a solution in in- 
tricate problems, and held him in 
high esteem. Now the Fathers 
could proceed to a fruitful ministry 
for souls. 



109 



^Meditations on the <SoWows ojUMaty 



INTRODUCTION 



r\EVOTION to the Sorrows of 
Mary was introduced by Our 
Blessed Lord Himself from the 
pulpit of the Cross. "Woman, be- 
hold thy son." "Behold thy 
Mother." 

From that hour of grace this 
devotion has endured and has flour- 
ished through every century that 
marks the life of the Church. 
Scarcely an age can be found in 
which they have not been promi- 
nently in the minds of men; the 
subject of painting, poetry and 
sculpture; the inspiration of art, 
architecture and music. 

The record is also to be found 
in the long, long list of churches, 
chapels, oratories which, from the 
days of the Apostles, have been 
dedicated to the Sorrows of Mary. 
Several feasts have been estab- 
lished in their honor, in order that 
men might ever hold them in re- 
membrance. Religious Orders have 
been founded with the Dolors of 
Mary as their particular devotion, 
or at least holding them in very 
high place. 



We find devotion to the Dolors 
of Mary outstanding in the lives 
of the Saints, beginning with those 
who were associated with her dur- 
ing the Passion of Our Lord. It 
flourished luxuriantly among the 
Fathers of the Desert and contin- 
ued on down to our own times 
when the life of Saint Gabriel, 
Passionist, bore glorious testimony 
to its efficacy as a means of sanc- 
tification. Quite recently, the No- 
vena of The Seven Dolors has 
spread far and wide with great 
rapidity, producing an abundance 
of good fruit. 

From the foregoing it appears 
that the Sorrows of Our Blessed 
Mother may well be studied by all 
Christians, especially by all Re- 
ligious, with the purpose of learn- 
ing more and more thoroughly the 
service they owe to God; with the 
purpose of supplying themselves 
with more urgent motives for serv- 
ing Him with increasing perfection. 

That these Meditations may con- 
tribute to these purposes, is the 
hope of Fr. Agatho, C. P. 



THE FIRST SORROW OF OUR BLESSED MOTHER 
THE PROPHECY OF HOLY SIMEON 

Devotions to Our Blessed Mother which she rendered to Almighty 
group themselves around different God. We look upon her as the 
phases of the wonderful service Mother of God and marvel that a 

These meditations owe their origin to a great extent to the inspiration of our late Fr. Alexander. 



112 



mere creature can hold that sub- 
lime relationship to the Creator 
Who made it out of nothing. We 
look upon her as The Blessed Vir- 
gin, as God's especially selected 
sign that He is ruling the heavens 
and loves man upon earth. We 
look upon her as the Immaculate 
Conception — "sinless and beauti- 
ful," our spiritual "Lady Fair." 
All these rich sources of devotion 
are well known and diligently 
worked by the children of the 
Church. 

There is still another view of 
Our Blessed Mother that can re- 
veal so much of loveliness, of fideli- 
ty and devotion that it is an end- 
less revelation of spiritual benefit 
to all who study it prayerfully. 
This is the study of Our Blessed 
Mother in the great service of Sor- 
row by which she crowned with 
glory all her noble works. 

What thoughts were in the mind 
of Mary as she went about ful- 
filling the law of purification? 
Forty days had passed since the 
birth of her child whom she knew 
to be the Incarnate Son of God. 
Now she was on her way to the 
temple to be purified according to 
the law; to dedicate her first-born 
to God, as the law demanded; to 
receive Him back into her keeping 
at the humble price of two little 
turtle doves. 

What were her thoughts? Most 
holy thoughts assuredly. There 
was the thought that she had ever 



been most faithful in her love and 
service of God; that out of love 
for Him she was fulfilling the law 
anent purification, though she was 
well aware that no purification was 
needed. No doubt she also thought 
of her own dedication in the tem- 
ple and of the time of her service 
therein. She most likely recalled 
that in the temple she had been 
espoused to holy Joseph, now her 
companion and escort. 

She remembered with most holy 
joy the words of the Angel Gabriel 
at the Annunciation, "Thou shalt 
call His name Jesus." "The Holy 
Ghost shall come upon Thee and 
the Power of the Most High shall 
overshadow thee, and therefore, al- 
so, the Holy (One) that shall be 
born of Thee shall be called The 
Son of God." Her mind went back 
to that holy time of mystery and 
wonder, recalling the anxiety of 
Joseph as her pregnancy became 
apparent ; and she found much hap- 
piness in the memory of his tender 
love and reverence for her. 

Now, in the company of her holy 
spouse, she was bringing her son, 
God's Co-equal Son, to present Him 
to His Eternal Father and to dedi- 
cate Him to the work for which 
He had come into the world. 

She remembered her visit to 
Elizabeth. How great had been her 
joy when the holy greeting con- 
firmed the words of the Annuncia- 
tion and recognized the Incarna- 
tion of the Son of God within her 



113 



Regarding our Rules 




lus Particulate C.P. 



In the preceding titles we have considered the material element of the Congregation. Now 
we turn to the formal element, or government. First we shall treat of the Rules, Regulations, 
and Customs. 

Rules, Regulations and Customs. 

(Pt. I, T. V., Ch. I) 

Article 5 
Power to Dispense From the Rule 



NOTION 110 ' A Dis P ensation is 
"a relaxation of the law 
in a special case, made by a com- 
petent superior, for a just and 
reasonable cause." 34 A just and 
reasonable cause is always neces- 
sary in order that a dispensation 
be licit; 35 for if the Superior dis- 
penses as he pleases, without rea- 
son, he will not be a faithful but 
an imprudent steward. In a law 
made by a Superior, moreover, a 
cause is also necessary for validi- 
ty ; !,i for it is rightly presumed 
that he grants the power of dis- 
pensing only where there is a just 
cause. 

A lighter or greater cause is re- 
quired "in proportion to the gravity 
of the law which is dispensed." 37 
Nevertheless, it must not be so 
great as to exempt from the law, 
for then the obligation of the law 



is understood to cease of its very 
nature. 



WHO CAN 
DISPENSE 



111. Besides the Pope 
and the Sacred Con- 
gregation of Religious, 
the General, by the express con- 
cession of the Roman Pontiff him- 
self, has the power to dispense from 
our Rules. 38 This concession was 
necessary, because by an approba- 
tion in forma specified, the Rule 
became pontifical law; 39 and, in 
the law of a superior, "no one can 
dispense unless it be granted 
him." 40 

From the tenor of the Bull, the 
General can dispense only "individ- 
ual persons, in particular cases, for 
just and reasonable causes." It is 
evident that a cause is required 
both for licit and valid dispensa- 
tion. The same faculty, moreover, 
circumscribed by the same limits, 



116 



is communicated to all other supe- 
riors, whether Provincial or local. 41 

For granting a dispensation to a 
whole family or Province for a 
short time, and likewise for per- 
manent dispensations to individual 
persons, the General needs the de- 
liberative vote of his Consultors, 
and also of those Provincials, whose 
Province is in question. 42 The Reg- 
ulations, moreover, grant the local 
superior the faculty of dispensing 
the religious family from the ob- 
ligation of Choir, whether in whole 
or in part, as long as there is a 
true, momentary and extraordin- 
ary necessity. 43 

With regard to general dispen- 
sations and those granted in per- 
petuity, the following decree of the 
30th General Chapter is worthy of 
note: "Considering the conditions 
under which our religious live in 
tropical or northerly regions, the 
Chapter voted in favor of having 
the respective Provincial Curias 
place their needs before the Gener- 



al, who with the vote of his Con- 
sultors, should grant necessary dis- 
pensations, or if necessity require, 
request them of the Holy See." 44 



EXTENSION 



112. Can the Superi- 



or, by force of the 
above-mentioned faculty, dispense 
from any article in the Rule? This 
must be understood in the nega- 
tive, for the faculty of dispensing 
given to our Superiors refers to 
disciplinary articles only, and not 
to the constitutive articles, i.e., 
those which bear on the substance 
and the constitution of the Con- 
gregation. Thus, a Superior, even 
the General, cannot dispense from 
the rule which forbids stable in- 
come for our Retreats (n.93) or a 
perpetual obligation of Masses 
(n.107), or from those which for- 
bid professed religious the admin- 
istration and use of their property 
(n.94), or which regard the elec- 
tion of Superiors, the holding of 
Chapters, (n.242) and like matters. 



34 Can. 80, 84. 35 Can. 80. 36 Can. 84. 37 Can. 84. 38 Bulla Suprem. Apost. par. 6., Breve: 
Salvatoris par. 50. 39 Cfr. n. 102. 40 Can. 80. 41 Collect. Facultat. n. 133. . 42 Bulla Suprem 
Apost. par. 6 ; Statuta n. 284. 43 Statuta n. 199. 44 Capit. Gen. XXX, deer. 5. 45 Collect. 
Facult. n. 134 



The 64 Dollar Answer? 

"Is not the mission field as cultivated by our method large enough? 
Why then are the laborers so few? Is it a question of 'novelty wearing 
off' that we look to modern outlets to exploit the zeal of our potential 
missionary body? Is it an unwillingness to prepare oneself? Is it too 
much of a tax on physical stamina? Does it disturb the spiritual equilibrium 
of the cloister-minded? Or is zeal dying? What is your answer? 

(Anon.) 



117 



Casus Moralis 



PASSIONIST CUSTOMS 

Summary : I. When held. II. "Who proposes it. III. Who has to solve it. IV. What the others 
may say. V. Duty of the one who proposes the case. VI. Names to be drawn by lot. 



I. Our Regulations order that 
the moral case should be held once 
a week after Vespers or the other 
afternoon choir observance. Often 
this is held on Saturday, or on 
some other day when the Priests 
are not busy; however, there must 
be some definite day of the week 
set aside for the moral case. In 
addition to the exemptions provid- 
ed for in the Regulations, it is 
also customary to omit it during 
vacation time. 

II. In Retreats of formal study 
it is the office of the Lector to 
propose the moral case, which he 
reads or has read to the others a 
week before it is to be solved. If 
this cannot be done in time, it 
should be hung in the usual place 
as soon as possible, that the Priests 
may be able to read it and set 
about finding the solution. The 
cause is proposed in Latin and is 
written up in this manner: First 
there is a brief and clear exposi- 
tion of a hypothetical event, then 
there are questions about the case, 
the final one being: Quid in casu? 
A question concerning a point of 
liturgy follows. 

III. To solve the case, the Com- 
munity gathers in the library, the 
recreation room, or some other 



place where the door may be closed 
and into which no secular person 
is to be admitted. A little box is 
to be ready, with the name of each 
priest written on a separate slip of 
paper. The students are also to 
take part after they have begun 
to study moral theology. 

IV. When the name of a Re- 
ligious has been drawn by lot, he 
removes his biretta, stands up, and 
reads the case through. Then, one 
by one, he answers the questions, 
either in Latin or in the vernacu- 
lar; he applies them to the case in 
point, which he discusses summari- 
ly, finally giving his solution, to- 
gether with his response to the 
question on liturgy. After he has 
finished, he is given a sign by the 
Superior to be seated. While speak- 
ing, he is not to be interrupted. 
Afterwards, however, the Superior 
asks each of the others if he has 
anything to add. If they have 
nothing, they rise, tip their biretta, 
and sit down again. 

V. The one who proposed the 
case rises last, at a sign from the 
Superior. He refutes anything er- 
roneous or not exactly correct. 
Then he gives what he considers 
the true solution of the case, to- 



118 



gether with his answer to the li- 
turgical question. If there is any 
disagreement, the Superior should 
see to it that no disputes arise and 
that no uncharitable remarks are 
made. But let all controverted mat- 
ter be amicably settled, and let the 
Superior himself set the example 
in this respect. 

VI. The names of the higher 
Superiors are not put in the box. 
In the novitiate house, the Master 



and Vice-Master may exempt them- 
selves, one each time, from at- 
tending the moral case if they have 
to be with the Novices. Visiting 
priests do not have to attend the 
moral case, nor missionaries who 
have just returned; but these lat- 
ter must be present after the third 
day of their mission rest, as this 
is an act of the daily observance; 
their names, however, are not 
drawn in solving the case. 




HOUSE OF RETREATS 

Here on this slope the plain and mountain meet 
And, as upon the beach's sloping sand 
Recurrent tides roll upward to the land 
And drop their burdens at the watcher's feet, 
Here break the tides that surge in lane and street; 
Here sounds again the old, divine command 
That stilled the waves of Galilee: the Hand 
Then raised, is lifted — and the Voice, as sweet. 

Once, on the waste of chaos and of night 
Crashed the great Fiat of the primal day 
And wisdom wrought, in radiance, to its ends; 
Here, once again it sounds: "Let there be light! 
Let there be peace! Arise and go thy way, 
For Magdalen and Dismas are my friends." 

Brother Richard, C.P. 



119 




% 



e 



Missionary 

FORUM 

• IDEALS 

• TRADITIONS 

• TECHNIQUES 

• LETTERS 

• EXAMPLES 

• SUGGESTIONS 



4- 



THE MISSIONER-CONFESSOR MUST BE ANOTHER CHRIST 
IN HIS MERCIFUL PATIENCE. 



C VERY priest is another Christ 
in his priestly powers, and 
every priest must strive to be 
another Christ in priestly virtue. 
The imitation of Christ in His 
virtues is necessary for a priest at 
all times, in all places, and in all 
his duties ; but nowhere is that 
imitation of Christ more necessary 



for a priest than it is in the con- 
fessional. There, more than else- 
where, people are most closely in 
contact with their priests. There, 
more than elsewhere, people put 
the virtues of their priests to the 
severest tests. 

In their faith people believe that 
their priests are other Christs in 



120 



FORUM 



their powers and duties. In the 
faith that the priest is another 
Christ to them they kneel beside 
him in the confessional. In that 
faith they confess to him what 
they would never reveal elsewhere 
to anyone else. In that faith they 
rightly expect the priest to be 
another Christ to them in virtue 
as well as in authority. And in 
that same faith they are rightly 
shocked, if a priest in the confes- 
sional does not give them a good 
example of virtue, but a bad ex- 
ample of weakness, failure, and 
vice. Canon Oakley declares, that: 
"in no other department of sacer- 
dotal duty does the success of the 
priest's ministrations depend more 
upon his personal sanctification 
than in all that relates to this mar- 
vellous institution of the mercy and 
providence of our Redeemer." 

As another Christ in the con- 
fessional, the priest should be an- 
other Christ in all virtues, but 
especially in merciful patience with 
sinners and compassion for them. 
At all times and in all places, but 
especially in the tribunal of mercy, 
we, who sit there as other Christs 
and Saviours, must imitate the 
example of the merciful Saviour, 
who said : "I have come not to 
destroy, but to save." In His spirit 
of merciful compassion we must 
imitate the example He gave when 
He saved the adulterous woman 
from those who were going to 



stone her to death ; the example 
He gave when He defended and 
forgave the sinful Magdalene; the 
example He gave when He turned 
to look at St. Peter after his de- 
nial ; the example He gave on the 
Cross when He heard the confes- 
sion of the repentant thief beside 
Him, and gave him absolution with 
the promise of heaven. What was 
said of Christ ought to be said of 
every priest who takes the place 
of Christ in the confessional: "the 
bruised reed he will not break, and 
the smoking flax he will not 
quench." (Matt. 12.20) 

In the confessional we must act 
as spiritual judges, physicians and 
fathers to our penitents. Without 
merciful patience and compassion 
for them we shall fail as judges in 
imitation of Christ, because our 
justice will not be tempered with 
mercy, and we shall harden hearts 
that should be softened. Without 
merciful patience and compassion 
we shall fail as physicians in imi- 
tation of Christ, because we shall 
be too rough, and worsen wounds 
that should be gently closed and 
cured. Without merciful patience 
and compassion we shall fail as 
fathers in imitation of Christ, be- 
cause we shall use the rod of cor- 
rection without the prudent mod- 
eration and pity for human frailty. 

Without merciful justice, pa- 
tience, and kindness in the treat- 
ment of souls there will be a big 



121 



FORUM 



contradiction between our preach- 
ing in the pulpit and our practice 
in the confessional. In the pulpit, 
preaching the story of the prodigal 
and his compassionate father, we 
shall give sinners hope for a mer- 
ciful pardon and a kindly reception 
from their father-confessor; but in 
the confessional, instead of the 
patient consideration promised and 
expected, they will meet hasty im- 
patience and no fatherly kindness. 
A fatherly compassion for sin- 
ners is necessary for every priest- 
confessor, but especially for us 
missionary priests and confessors. 
On our missions we constantly urge 
people to come, calling sinners to 
penance, telling them it is a time 
of very special grace, and promis- 
ing them not only special sermons 
and instructions, but also, special 
attention to their needs, special 
consideration for their difficulties, 
and special assistance for all who 
need it. Proclaiming, that "now 
is the acceptable time, now is the 
day of salvation" we promise to 
give penitents more time and more 
help in the works of salvation than 
they get at other times. Therefore, 
they are disappointed and justly 
complain when they do not meet 
in the confessional what was prom- 
ised from the pulpit, — when con- 
fessors do not give them a patient 
hearing, a kindly consideration, 
and a charitable help in their 
confessions. 

122 



Our missionary zeal, to be a 
true zeal, must be far more than 
a zeal to go out from place to 
place on missions. It must be far 
more than a zeal to preach bigi 
sermons and draw big crowds. It 
must be far more than a zeal ini 
appealing and urging and promis- 
ing much from the pulpit and the 
platform. It must be a zeal thatl 
does not shrink from the monotony 
and hardship of hearing confes- 
sions. It must be a zeal that does* 
not fade away in the confessional. 
It must be a zeal manifested by, 
a patient, helpful, fatherly compas- 
sion for poor sinners when they 
come as penitent prodigals to kneel 
beside a spiritual father, hoping 
for what was promised from the 
pulpTt; hoping for fatherly conn 
passion when they are timid and 
fearful; hoping for fatherly com-i 
passion when they are stupid and 
ignorant; hoping for fatherly conn 
passion when they are doubtful 
and scrupulous ; hoping for father- 
ly compassion in their trials and 
troubles, in their hardships and 
sufferings, as well as in their piety 
and devotion. 

The confessional is the testing 
ground for our priestly virtue. The 
quality of our work there indi- 
cates the quality of our missionary 
zeal. Cardinal Manning declared 
that "the first part of his duty 
that a lukewarm priest forsakes is 
his duty in the confessional." A 



FORUM 



missioner fails in that test of zeal 
when he complains about the mo- 
notony and hardships of hearing 
confessions. He fails in that test 
when he says to his companions : 
"Don't delay and waste time in the 
confessional." "Push them on and 
keep them going!" He fails in 
that test when he boasts of how 
many confessions he hears in an 
hour. Pushing penitents on he is 
impatient and harsh to those who 
are slow and not well prepared. 
Pushing penitents on he will hear 
bad confessions that could be made 
good by a little patient help. He 
slips away from the confessional 
before others, who are left to do 
more because he does less. He cur- 
tails the days and hours for hear- 
ing confessions, and will not make 
an exception to oblige and befriend 
poor sinners who come out of time, 
and interfere with his time for the 
follies of the radio and newspaper. 
He preaches the words of a com- 
passionate Christ, Who said: "Come 
to Me all ye who labor and are 
heavily burdened, and I will re- 
fresh you ;" but he does not prac- 
tice what he preaches. 

St. John Eudes said : "Preachers 
beat the bushes, but confessors 
catch the birds." And yet we must 
add that confessors are not good 
bird catchers, if they are not kind 
and gentle in handling birds that 
flutter at the screen of the con- 
fessional. There would not be so 



many "mission birds" in every 
parish, if there were more careful 
catchers in every confessional. Our 
Lord said : "I will make you fish- 
ers of men." Success in fishing 
depends very much on patient 
watching and patient angling, and 
on our missions some of the big- 
gest fish are caught by a little 
patience with stragglers who come 
along out of the regular hours for 
confessions, and especially with 
some who take a last chance on the 
last night of the mission, after the 
Papal Blessing has been given. The 
giving of that blessing gives to 
some the extra grace needed to 
complete a good impulse. 

Missioner-Confessors must be 
other Christs in patience and com- 
passion to gain the confidence of 
those who have been making bad 
confessions. St. Alphonsus and 
other great missioners have told us 
that the reparation of bad confes- 
sions is "the chief fruit of mis- 
sions." Bad confessions will not 
be discovered and remedied by con- 
fessors who do not gain the con- 
fidence of penitents by kindly pa- 
tience and merciful compassion. 
That "chief fruit of missions" is 
not gathered by hasty, impatient 
confessors, who make the timid 
more timid, who do not wait for 
the slow to tell what is hard to 
tell, and are not helpful to those 
who need a helpful father and 
friend. Nor is that chief fruit 



123 



FORUM 



gathered by confessors who are not 
careful with the careless by wisely 
probing their conscience and pru- 
dently asking them questions. Care- 
less, hasty, impatient confessors do 
not help sinners to repair bad con- 
fessions, but cause them to con- 
tinue in this sacrilege. Father 
O'Donnell warns us of that danger, 
and says: "If a confessor hurries 
penitents at their confessions or 
too readily presumes their inno- 
cence he is likely to tempt them to 
insincerity." Quoting Cajetan, he 
asks : "Is it not better to hear two 
confessions well, than twenty care- 
lessly and superficially ?" "Is it not 
better to take time with penitents 
than to turn the tribunal of pen- 
ance into a couch for sinners?" 

Pope Leo XII reminded confes- 
sors that "sinners who come to 
confession altogether unprepared 
may be converted, if priests clothe 
themselves with the tender mercy 
of Jesus, and treat sinners with 
zeal, patience, and meekness. If 



priests neglect to do so, they have 
no wine and oil for the sick and 
wounded, and they must be judged I 
more unfit to hear confessions* 
than others are to make them." 

Warning us against haste even 
when many are waiting at the 
confessional, St. Alphonsus says: 
"You are not responsible to God 
for those who are waiting outside, 
but you are responsible to God for 
those inside when you begin to 
hear their confessions." A good 
penitent fears the sacrilege of mak- 
ing bad confessions. In that holy 
priest fears the sacrilege of hear- 
ing a bad confessions. In that holy 
fear we must fear to be a cause 
of sacrilege by any carelessness, 
haste, impatience, or harshness. Ini 
missionary zeal for the salvation 
of souls we must strive to be Fa- 
thers in spirit as well as in name ; 
we must strive to be other Christs, 
not only in His priestly powers 
and duties, but also, in His broth- 
erly love and merciful compassion. 



CoHJj 



omessioH* 



Editor of the Forum: 

In the Missionary Conference as 
quoted in The Passionist, January, 
19 %9 issue (page 29), we read: "With 
the understanding of the superior of 
the mission, it should be left to the 
missionaries when to start hearing 
confessions. 1 ' Apropos of this, would 

124 



it not accord with the purpose and 
spirit of the mission to announce at 
the closing, preferably after the Papal 
blessing, that confessions would be 
heard after the Benediction, for those 
and only those who had not opportuni- 
ty to go during the mission? My ex- 
perience has been that a few strag- 



FORUM 



glers well worth while, have made a 
much needed confession. The impres- 
sive solemnity of our Closing has 
often been the grace that captured. 
It is a good time too, for fulfilling the 
condition of confession in order to 
gain the plenary indulgence. 

A Veteran. 

It would seem that there is no con- 
travening of method or custom in the 



above suggestion, the proviso being 
that it be with the understanding of 
the superior of the mission. However, 
it is not recommended that this be a 
set practice for all missions. Size of 
parish, number of confessions heard 
or negligence in receiving the Sacra- 
ment, the temper of the people, etc. 
should determine the advisability of 
one or more going into the confession- 
al after the Benediction. 

Editor. 



jliose lMee noute 



In all the divisions of time known 
to men, there are none more fa- 
mous (or infamous!) than those 
three hours during which the Sal- 
vation of the world was spiked to 
the wooden throne which we call 
the tree of the Cross. In Roman 
usage, it was the third hour when 
Christ was nailed to the gibbet 
(Mark 15,35), and the ninth hour 
when He gave up the spirit, (ibid. 
15,37). Because of the tremendous 
work wrought in so short a time — 
it was a whirlwind accomplish- 
ment — devout Christians have 
cherished the memory of those woe- 
ful moments in which Love unut- 
terable spent itself completely, and 
have taken to their heart and have 
pondered deeply the words spoken 
by Christ on His deathbed. A 
deathbed message, either as a com- 
plete unit, or simply a matter of 
detached pronouncements, is al- 
ways a thing for reflection, action, 
comment. No wonder, then, that 



there was gradually evolved the 
sacred watch entitled "Tre Ore." 
A most natural evolution, indeed, 
considering the ways of devout 
love. Saint Matthew says of the 
soldiers that "they sat and watched 
Him." (Matt. 27,36). But those 
men were of those who have eyes 
and see not, ears and hear not. 
Love would demand a reparational 
balance. Hence, our modern prac- 
tise of looking and listening, no 
matter what the bodily posture. 

It seems fairly certain that the 
modern form of the Tre Ore had 
its inception in the year 1815, at 
the hands and hearts of the Prec- 
ious Blood Fathers. This claim has 
been handed down amongst them ; 
and we know that the indulgence 
granted for such an observance 
was first granted by the Holy See 
in that year. (cf. Raccolta, p. 115, 
VI., n.165.) Be all this as it may, 
this devotion plays a prominent 
part in our modern devotional life, 



125 



FORUM 



and missionary priests are often 
called upon to conduct such exer- 
cises. It can be an affair of labor 
and even of tedium, considering 
various circumstances; but hardly 
more painful and laborious than it 
was for Him who first committed 
Himself to those strenuous hours 
on the throne or pulpit of the 
Cross ! 

It would seem that the preaching 
of a Tre Ore is definitely in line 
with the work of a Passionist, al- 
beit some do protest! We take a 
vow to promote devotion to the 
Passion, according to the Rule. 
Now the Rule, having established 
that our proper works are missions 
and retreats, amplifies this by the 
following: "Circumstances will o- 
pen numerous other ways of pro- 
moting so great a work, and of 
accomplishing their pious desire 
and purpose, to the great advance- 
ment of their own souls and of 
those of others. For the love of 
God is very ingenius and is proved, 
not so much by words, as by the 
deeds and examples of the lovers." 
(Rule: XVI., n. 132, pp. 60-51). 
Moreover, the Rule also encourages 
us ". . . to do with earnestness all 
those things, which, considering 
the varieties of times, places, and 
persons, will be of the greatest 
advantage to the people, . . (XXIII., 
n. 192, pp. 70-71.) In view of all 
this, it would be hard for a man 
with any zeal at all to sidestep 



such an opportunity as a Tre Ore 
for accomplishing something for 
Christ Crucified. 

The number of sermons for such 
an exercise will vary. The usual 
arrangement will call for an intro- 
ductory and a concluding talk, with 
one on each of the words. The 
nature of these sermons would 
seem to be indicated by the word- 
ing of the Raccolta in reference to 
the conditions for gaining the in- 
dulgence granted for the observ- 
ance of the Tre Ore : that those 
of the faithful who "strive to medi- 
tate for three continuous hours 
publicly or privately on the suffer- 
ings of the dying Savior and the 
sacred words which He said on the 
Cross, or who recite Psalms, hymns 
and other vocal prayers, may gain 
a plenary indulgence on condition 
of confession and Communion on 
Holy Thursday or during Easter 
week, and prayers for the inten- 
tion of the Holy Father." (Rac- 
colta: VI., n. 165, p. 115). 

Thus the key-word for the ser- 
mon procedure could be 'medita- 
tion.' There should be no need 
for declamatory violence. The 
earthquake which took place on the 
first Good Friday should be suf- 
ficient for all time. Meditation is 
a most fruitful work. As Passion- 
ists we are to strive with might 
and main to teach the people to 
meditate. ". . . For this profitable 
and salutary meditation is a most 



126 



- FORUM 



efficacious means for withdrawing 
the minds of men from iniquity 
and for leading them on to the 
Christian perfection at which we 
aim." (Rule: I., n. 4, p. 6) 

The call to conduct a Tre Ore 
is the chance of the year to ac- 
complish our purpose as Passion- 
ists. In this connection, it is wor- 
thy of consideration to mention the 
fittingness of using the "appeal" 
technique in the Tre Ore sermons. 
It is an established fact that our 
appeal to the Crucifix at the end 
of the evening sermon during a 
mission is most affecting and ef- 
fective. Why not cast the sermons 
of the Tre Ore in prayerful form? 
If ever there was a time for prayer, 
it is in these commemorative hours 
in honor of Him Who hung be- 
tween Heaven and earth to make 
intercession for humanity, in order 
that the handwriting against us 
might be blotted out. 

Another method not too fre- 
quently followed, if at all, is that 
of seeing and hearing everything 
during the Tre Ore through the 
eyes and ears of Mary. She stood 
by the Cross. She was certainly 
the most interested of all the spec- 
tators and auditors. This was her 
Boy being so cruelly butchered, 
whittled down to His last breath. 
What He might have to say during 
those last moments of His life 
would be of tremendous importance 
to her. If, at the very beginning 



of His life she treasured up words 
spoken of Him by others, and pon- 
dered them in her heart, what 
would not be her reaction towards 
His very own words spoken at the 
end of His life. Truly these seven 
last words are ones to be laid up 
and pondered in the heart of 
hearts. Such a Tre Ore should be 
a very powerful means of stirring 
up compunction. 

More recently there has come 
into vogue the "liturgical" Tre Ore 
in which the Mass of the Pre- 
sanctified takes the more promi- 
nent part, and the sermons are 
secondary. These sermons, usually 
three or four in number may deal 
with the functions of Good Friday 
in an explanatory manner; or they 
may be on any phase of the Pas- 
sion. In case a Pastor asks for 
sermons with explanation of the 
ceremonies, the volume of Gueran- 
ger's "Liturgical Year" concerning 
Holy Week will be found helpful. 
As far as this writer knows, this 
is the only place where an explana- 
tion is to be had of the triple 
unveiling of the Cross: to wit, it 
indicates the progressively exten- 
sive preaching of the Cross; first 
to a small number of the Jews, 
then to a wider audience of the 
Jews, plus the Greeks, finally to 
the whole world. The magazine 
Orate Fratres circ. Volume 1940 
has some valuable notes on these 
ceremonies. One may also consult 



127 



FORUM 



Cardinal Schuster's Sacramentary, 
an excellent work indeed. For more 
material and ideas regarding the 
Tre Ore sermons, the following are 
available: Homiletic and Pastoral 
Review, Vol. XXXVIII, April, 1938, 
pp. 682-91, "Passiontide Preach- 
ing," ibid. Vol. XLVI, April 1946, 
pp. 481,86, "Sermons on the Three 
Hours Agony" ; A Select Bibliog- 
raphy of the Passion, pp. 58-62, 
"Seven Last Words." There are 
books galore. 

The program for a Tre Ore 
should be definitely in hand before 
the day itself, even though this 
means writing a letter or making 
a 'phone call. Some, by not doing 
this, have found Good Friday to 
be a day of affliction and rebuke, 
indeed. A good musical program 
is almost essential, because of the 
power of music to move. Do not 
allow the pastor to "get away with" 
haphazard renditions, either by the 
school children or others. Do not 
run the risk of having him greet 
you warmly with the words : "This 
is your Tre Ore, Father!", and 
then toss you to the lions. If he 
will not provide a suitable program 
or schedule, insist on furnishing 
your own, and that it be carried 
out. Otherwise, the ensuing con- 
fusion will effectually destroy the 
atmosphere of prayer and, concen- 
tration. 



If, in spite of all precautions, 
there is danger of being comprom- 
ised on the time schedule, recite 
the sorrowful mysteries, have the 
Way of the Cross performed, in 
order to take up the slack. In 
cases where padding would be nec- 
essary, the sermon on the Third 
Word can always be amplified, or 
the Sixth Word can be enlarged by 
a resume of all the things that 
were finished by the death on the 
Cross. Accurate timing is not ab- 
solutely essential, especially after 
the fashion of the radio, but it is 
a source of satisfaction to the 
clergy, and of admiration to the 
faithful, if the Tre Ore ends pre- 
cisely at three o'clock. 

The apex of Christ's priesthood 
was attained when He hung upon 
the Cross, clad as He was in the 
vesture of derision, anointed with 
contempt, crowned with expiatory 
suffering. Never was He more 
priestly. If we have an opportuni- 
ty to lead the faithful through 
those three hours of His sacrifice, 
we should count it an honor and a 
glory. What a text, and what cere- 
monies there were for that act of 
oblation ! The call to assist others 
to enter into the spirit of the Tre 
Ore is a challenge to those of us 
who are identified with Christ in 
that selfsame priesthood. 



\Jx. Smtnanazi, d. l/ . 



128 



Followers of the Crucified 



Jude of the Holy Family 

'It is appointed for men once to die . . 



(Heb. 9, 27) 



GATHER JUDE kept his appoint- 
ment with God on Monday, 
April 19th, 1948, at 4:45 P.M. in 
our Chicago Monastery. It was in 
the Infirmary during the brief min- 
utes that he was left alone. Fa- 
thers Alban and Bennet had just 
stepped out of the room and into 
the adjoining infirmary room to 
speak with Fr. Jude's niece. When 
they returned it was to see Jude 
quietly slipping into the shadows 
of Death, beyond which is the sun- 
rise of Eternity. 

Father Jude McKinnon was born 
in Boston, Mass. on February 7, 
1903, and baptized Joseph. His 
mother's maiden name was Agnes 
Harvey. 

The growing boy revealed intel- 
lectual talents above the average. 
So when he became aware of a 
vocation to the Priesthood, he felt 
he could give best expression to 
his talents in the Passionist Con- 



gregation. He entered the Passion- 
ist Preparatory Seminary of the 
Eastern Province, only to discover 
that the time was not yet ripe 
for adopting permanently the Pas- 
sionist mode of life. He left, to 
enter St. Bonaventure's, a major 
Franciscan Seminary in Allegheny, 




Father Jude 



129 



N.Y., to still better prepare himself 
for his Vocation. 

During his attendance at St. 
Bonaventure's, Joseph McKinnon 
became one of the most popular 
students on the campus and in the 
classroom. A fellow student etches 
his character briefly and conserva- 
tively thus : He was well-liked and 
a good student. 

It was here in St. Bonaventure's, 
under the spell and inimitable 
genius of the great masters of 
Theology that Father Jude re- 
ceived the grounding in principles 
and impetus of intellectual energy 
that was subsequently to make him 
the keen theologian and brilliant 
professor. 

From St. Bonaventure's, Joseph 
entered the Western Province of 
the Passionists in 1929. He went 
directly to the Novitiate, adopted 
the name Jude and was professed 
July 29, 1930. His Ordination fol- 
lowed three years later on October 
8, 1933. 

Fr. Jude's first official assign- 
ment after Ordination was the post 
of Theology Instructor, first in 
Kansas and then in Chicago. 

Altho Fr. Jude held the office of 
teacher for only a relatively short 
time (as teaching assignments go), 
he displayed a remarkable acumen 
in imparting information together 
with analysis and explanations. His 
grasp of principles was masterful 
while his application of them was 
practical to the point of simplicity 
itself. His astuteness in judging 

130 



men and situations resulted in ren- 
dering decisions and giving advice 
in so easy and matter-of-fact way 
that made one marvel. The full 
use of his unusual mental equip- 
ment could have made him out- 
standing as a Lector. 

But Father Jude had other as- 
pirations. He would have chosen 
to work for souls directly, instead 
of indirectly by preparing others 
for the actual contact. He particu- 
larly cherished the ambition to de- 
vote his life to the neglected 
Negroes of the South. He would 
sometimes remark dreamily how he 
would love to go south to live a- 
mong them, to go sort of "native" 
and live their environment to get 
closer to them. Yet he was never 
to realize his dream. 

Instead, we find him assigned to 
Father Peter Hanley as assistant 
Chaplain in Hines' Veterans' Hos- 
pital in Chicago. 

Father Jude's appearance there 
and his introduction to his new 
duties made an instant impression 
that was to grow in fondness in 
the hearts and minds of patients 
and personnel alike at the Hospital. 
So when Father Peter resigned his 
charge in 1940 Father Jude took 
over the Chaplaincy in its fullness. 

He not only took over the Chap- 
laincy, but took over also the 
hearts and captivated the minds of 
all with whom he came into con- 
tact. For apart from his intellec- 
tual gifts, Father Jude possessed 
a charm of character that cap- 



tivated the most casual acquain- 
tance. His understanding heart and 
sympathetic disposition inspired 
confidence and won affection. It 
was rare to find him without a 
heart-warming smile, and rarer 
still to find him at loss for suitable 
answer or agreeable recommenda- 
tion. 

This congenial and ingratiating 
quality of his character made him 
a popular member of any Com- 
munity or gathering. Public rec- 
reations were enlivened by his 
ready wit and gift of repartee. 
He easily became the center of at- 
traction in any gathering. No 
conversation became dull where Fr. 
Jude participated. 

The sum total of all these traits 
made an ideal combination that 
fitted him admirably for his de- 
pressing tasks as Chaplain. And 
when one realizes that the over-all 
factor of his life was charity to- 
gether with his facility of super- 
naturalizing his activities, one has 
the explanation of Fr. Jude's phe- 
nominal success and popularity. No 
man's memory is so dearly and 
tenderly cherished at Hines' as Fa- 
ther Jude's. Only in Heaven will 
one know the full extent of the 
man's influence in the rehabilita- 
tion and salvation of souls there. 
But if we are to judge from re- 
sults and by all accounts of those 
who observed him or worked with 
him, his influence bordered on the 
hypnotic. 



Let a patient be writhing in 
agony, the approach of Father 
Jude's radiant countenance was 
like sun dissolving fog. Courageous 
smiles began to meet his and a 
man felt the better for his visit. 
An observer said of him: "He 
never thought of himself, seemed 
to be blessed with comforting the 
sick." 

While in the realm of the spir- 
itual, many a man, grown unfamil- 
iar with the ways of the Sacra- 
ments thru years of neglect, found 
himself making his Confession to 
Father Jude before he fully re- 
alized what he was doing! 

To the poor and unfortunate, his 
charity reflected His Master's. He 
begged for them from his friends. 
He was instrumental in many ad- 
vantageous changes at Hines. He 
did not rest until he had a Chapel 
for his boys. 

In his speech Father Jude 
seemed to be guided by his own 
motto : "If your foot slips, you may 
recover your balance. But if your 
tongue slips, you may never re- 
cover your words." 

In a very eloquent and fervent 
tribute to Fr. Jude's memory, Fa- 
ther Joseph Mary said of him in 
his funeral sermon : 

"As Chaplain of Hines Veterans' 
Hospital, Fr. Jude was a true apos- 
tle of Catholic truth. Not content 
with the ordinary duties of preach- 
ing and instruction — tho eminent 



131 



in both fields — he broadened con- 
siderably the range of his minis- 
try. With great zeal and consum- 
mate ability, he explained and de- 
fended Catholic teaching to all 
with whom he came in contact. 
He made every effort to counteract 
the false that threatened the Cath- 
olic integrity of his professional 
associates. An apostolate of Cath- 
olic reading in philosophy, psychol- 
ogy, and ethics, as well as in re- 
ligion, was part of his concept of 
duty as Catholic Chaplain. And all 
bear witness that Fr. Jude was 
'as a man approved, a worker that 
cannot be ashamed, rightly han- 
dling the word of truth.' (2 Tim. 
2, 15) 

"But the great work that en- 
deared Fr. Jude to all was his 
ministry of healing. In his spirit- 
ual ministry to the souls committed 



to his care, he was literally untir- 
ing. Day or night, he was ready 
and alert to go without question, 
complaint, or hesitancy to any one 
in need. And like his divine Mas- 
ter, his great heart went out also 
to the physical and mental ills of 
his boys. To them, he could be 
nurse and assistant, father and 
mother. In countless ways, he triecf 
to lessen their pain, to lighten their 
trial, to lift up their minds and 
hearts to cheerfulness and hope, to 
acceptance and resignation. He 
shared their family secrets and 
attachments, was a strong bond of 
union between them and their loved 
ones, a bureau of information for 
loving and anxious ones at home." 
The sentiments of both personnel 
and patients at the Hospital are 
simply and touchingly expressed in 
a poem of Mary Frances Mears: 



TO FATHER JUDE 
Hospital Chaplain 

They v/ere "his boys," his brothers all, 

Behind their flimsy mask of race or creed; 

At any hour he heard their call 

And answered, with no thought but of their need. 

Good, patient, tireless, kindly soul, 
He never chided nor complained, His smile 
His voice, his manner, would console, 
Would stop their hurts, their pain, awhile. 

And now he sleeps. His busy hands 

Are folded, resting on his quiet breast; 

And each who knew and loved him understands, 

God said, "Well done!" God love him best. 

But — down long corridors that knew his midnight tread, 
His footsteps still pause beside each wakeful bed. 



132 



Doctor Sherlock, a close friend 
of Fr. Jude pays his memory this 
tribute : 

"MANY TIMES" 

"The place was the Veterans Ad- 
ministration Hospital, Hines, Il- 
linois (2000 beds) where he was 
Chaplain — not for Catholics only — 
I met him many times. 

"In his ministration to those of 
his own faith, a consolation was 
often demonstrated — Father Jude: 
'I'm not a Catholic but can I have 
one of those leaflets — I'd like a 
medal — stop to see me when you 
are on the Ward — won't you?' I 
met him many times. 

"By the bedside of the dying, 
through the corridors of the hos- 
pital, I met him in the halls; I 
met him in the confessional, I met 
him by my hearthstone, I met him 
many times. 

"That voice now stilled forever, 
left a comfort in the life and hopes 
of those who knew him. He seemed 
radiant with everything God cre- 
ated ; his smile was ready and it 
mattered not from what angle, God 
was always brought in, and now 
throughout the coming years and 
as long as day returns, the tribute 
of our love and prayers we give 
to Father Jude." 

Sherlock 

The fact that, according to hu- 
man reckoning, Fr. Jude finished 
his life prematurely at the age of 
45, would indicate a latent tragedy. 
For his death was not sudden in 



the ordinarily accepted sense of 
the term. 

Altho he might have appeared 
to the casual observer to be in 
robust health and vigor, an im- 
pression heightened by his cheery 
and jovial personality, yet he car- 
ried the augury of Death within 
him from early in his Religious 
life. What seemed like minor ail- 
ments at first and sometimes ig- 
nored and neglected, grew steadily 
in scope and seriousness until 
their cumulative power wore out 
his life. A kidney ailment seems 
to have been the beginning. 

When he was relieved of his 
teaching responsibility, he went to 
California to rest and recuperate 
from an advancing intestinal dis- 
order. Apparently restored, he 
came to Chicago and to Hines. 
Thus he was also in a position to 
have his health checked, since some 
of the greatest names in the Medi- 
cal world appeared on the Hines' 
roster; while other consultant 
specialists were guests of the Staff 
on frequent occasions. Father Jude 
came to know them all and his 
easy, agreeable familiarity enlisted 
their attention. 

Specialists diagnosed him and 
experts prescribed remedies. But 
Father Jude, imperceptibly yet 
none the less definitely, kept fail- 
ing gradually. His kidney ailment 
began to affect his eyesight to the 
extent that it baffled the experts. 
Specialists from one end of the 



133 



country to the other examined his 
eyes and prescribed various reme- 
dies, treatments and glasses. But 
the affliction was so peculiar and 
elusive that the condition of his 
eyes would change almost from 
hour to hour. This made it diffi- 
cult for the specialists to keep any 
sort of record of reliable reference. 

Eventually, in 1946, Father Jude 
realized he could no longer keep 
up under the strain at Hines. He 
already had surprised his diagnos- 
ticians by living beyond the time 
they allotted to him. Two years 
before he left Hines the doctors 
told him specifically and definitely 
that he would not live beyond six 
months ! So he would refer to him- 
self as living on borrowed time. 

His kidney condition became so 
acute that other intestinal organs 
became affected and complications 
began to set in. The resultant 
effect appeared in a condition of 
high blood pressure that went all 
out of bounds. Frequent black-outs 
followed and at least once he suf- 
fered partial paralysis. He recov- 
ered from this. But he was in con- 
stant and imminent danger of 
cerebral hemorrhage. 

Father Jude left Hines Hospital 
in 1946 and was transferred to the 
Community in Des Moines. With 
the release from strain and re- 
sponsibility, he seemed to take 
a new lease on life. His spirits 
rose and he began to plan his 
missionary career. But what 



seemed a gradual restoration to | 
health was only in appearance. His 
dizzy spells began to return and 
he found need of renewed medical 
attention. 

During one of his dizzy spells 
he fell on the stairs and fractured 
both wrists. This shock to his 
system gave him a serious set- 
back. He was hospitalized in Mercy 
Hospital from November in 1946 
to January 25, 1947. Shortly after 
he visited home for a brief vaca- 
tion, which was to be his last. 

It was noticed that his left wrist 
was not mending normally and 
continued to bother him. X-rays 
revealed a maladjustment of the 
fractured bones and faulty knit- 
ting. This called for the ordeal of 
another operation to correct the 
first. So Fr. Jude entered Mercy 
Hospital again on May 5, 1947. 
His return to the Monastery now 
would only be to die. 

To perform a second operation 
on his left wrist, it was necessary 
for him to take an anesthetic in 
the form of ether. The disturbed 
condition of his gastronomic tract 
rendered him acutely allergic to 
this form of anaesthesia. So when 
he returned to his room after the 
operation he went into such terri- 
ble and violent convulsions that it 
was feared he would strangulate. 
Oxygen, together with every con- 
ceivable therapeutic measure was 
administered without avail. It was 
suggested that he be anointed. But 



134 



finally artificial respiration brought 
him out of the spasm. It was not, 
however, to be his last seizure. 

After this second operation he 
would rally and relapse. But his 
rallies became less frequent, while 
the relapses lasted longer. The 
Doctors delibrated over the advisa- 
bility of further operations, partic- 
ularly a Smithwyck, to reduce his 
extreme blood pressure. But when 
they felt they had one condition 
under control and ready to chance 
an operation, something else would 
develop to prevent any operating. 
By now he could not even be safely 
moved to another city where other 
specialists might take over. Ap- 
parently everything was done for 
him that anyone in Des Moines 
could possibly do. 

Early in January of 1948 Father 
Jude decided he would like to be 
taken to Chicago. He never lost 
hope and confidence in some of 
the Doctors he knew in Chicago. 
He felt sure they would pull him 
thru. So he was discharged from 
Mercy Hospital in Des Moines and 
entered the Alexian Brothers Hos- 
pital in Chicago. 

Yet he was not long at the Alex- 
ian Brothers Hospital before it 
came to him positively and defin- 
itely that the sands of his hour 
glass were swiftly running out. He 
had a sure premonition that it 
would now be only a matter of 
days, or weeks at most. He asked 
to be taken to our Retreat in Nor- 



wood Park. He would be anointed 
each time death seemed to hover 
over him. 

In April of 1948 he and a con- 
frere, who would follow him not 
too far in the future, were discus- 
sing the probability of an early 
death. Father Sebastian remarked 
about the appropriateness of going 
before Our Holy Founder's Feast 
Day. Jude replied that, yes, it 
would be nice to spend the Feast 
Day in Heaven. Apparent he got 
his wish, for Jude left for eternity 
just 9 days before the Feast of 
St. Paul of the Cross. 

Altho Fr. Jude kept fighting des- 
perately to cling to life and kept 
hoping against hope that he would 
recover, yet the last two weeks of 
his life found him convinced that 
his hopes were futile. With this 
realization, he threw his whole be- 
ing into an immediate preparation 
for his coming death. The report 
of this preparation is enviably edi- 
fying. 

Again I quote from Father Jo- 
seph's sermon: 

"Like his Master, teaching and 
doing good, Fr. Jude was called 
to share intimately in the Sacred 
Passion of Jesus. Severely handi- 
capped at first and then fatally 
stricken — at the very height of his 
powers — Father's way to Calvary 
was long and hard. But 'with a 
great heart and a willing mind,' he 
accepted God's holy will. There was 
no complaining, no questioning." 



135 



To say that Father Jude had no 
faults would be to deny the truth 
and contradict the direct testimony 
of the Holy Spirit Himself, who 
revealed that even the just fall 
seven times a day. 

Yet much of what might have 
appeared glaring faults of Fr. Jude 
— his peevishness, impatience, and 
distress of Superiors — could pos- 
sibly be explained as an escape 
mechanism from the intensity of 
his suffering. Quite like a man 
who will bite his nails or pull his 
hair when in excruciating pain. 
That Father Jude suffered unbear- 
able agonies almost constantly dur- 
ing the last years of his life, no 
one who had the opportunity of 
living with him or observing him 
can deny. Yet rarely does one find 
a sufferer who could equal Fr. Jude 
in resignation and cheerfulness un- 
der suffering. If he tried the pa- 
tience of his Superiors at times, 
it was not thru deliberate for- 
wardness so much as thru a des- 
peration for surcease from mental 
and physical torment. Mostly the 
manifestations of the subconscious 
impulse for relief and rest. "While 
some of the difficulties he might 
have had with Nurses or Doctors 
while he was a patient in the Hos- 



pital, were the result of his unusual 
fund of information about medical 
matters. He wanted to be sure 
that the treatment given him was 
the right treatment and the medi- 
cine the right medicine. 

Otherwise his discussion of his 
suffering and illness was not so 
much in the nature of complaining 
as simply to have something to 
talk about with his visitors. It 
was merely matter for conversa- 
tion similar to baseball or football 
or any other topic. His real spirit 
of resignation was admired by all 
who waited on him or attended 
him. 

But to paraphrase Mark An- 
thony's opening lines over the body 
of Caesar, I write not to canonize 
Fr. Jude, but to prepare his obitu- 
ary. Just praise will be his from 
God, so we might best leave his 
faults to the benign judgments of 
a merciful God, while we would 
do well to imitate his virtues. For 
were anyone to deny that Father 
Jude praticed virtues, that too, 
would be to deny the truth. The 
over-all picture of his virtues out- 
balances that of his faults. 

May the ineffable Light of God 
shine upon his soul. 



Sebastian of the Sorrowful Virgin 



CATHER SEBASTIAN of the 

Sorrowful Virgin, known before 

his entry into religious as Harold 

J. Palmer, was born at Lewistown, 



Pennsylvania, on December 3, 
1889. His parents were Joseph Pal- 
mer and Mary Tomey. In his 
boyhood the family moved to Cleve- 



136 



land, Ohio, which city henceforth 
Father Sebastian was to call home. 
Father Sebastian became a mem- 
ber of the Congregation on May 
4, 1919, when he was professed in 
the old novitiate of Holy Cross 
Province, Sacred Heart Retreat in 
Louisville, Ky. He was ordained 
a priest by Bishop Howard of Cov- 
ington, Ky., in our Church of Holy 
Cross, Cincinnati, Ohio, on April 
27, 1927. 

The best of us, no doubt, have 
often indulged in day-dreaming 
about what our life both as per- 
sons and as religious might have 
been, had we lived in circumstanc- 




Father Sebastian 



es other than the actual ones. Fa- 
ther Sebastian might have been a 
retreat director, a missionary; he 
might have engaged in any of the 
works of the ministry usually un- 
dertaken by our priests ; he might 
have gone on the foreign missions 
to China. Both at his religious 
profession and at his ordination he 
became one with our Divine Lord, 
"Who through the Holy Spirit of- 
fered Himself unblemished to God." 
(Heb. 9, 14) God accepted this 
offering Father Sebastian made of 
his life, and for His own divine 
sake and for Father Sebastian's 
sake and for the sake of souls, He 
would dispose of that life through 
that same Holy Spirit, "Who di- 
vides to everyone according as He 
will." (I Cor. 12:11) All Chris- 
tians, and especially all religious, 
by their very vocation and profes- 
sion are sufferers. Saint Peter 
teaches us this : "Beloved, do not 
be startled at the trial by fire that 
is taking place among you to prove 
you, as if something strange were 
happening to you ; but inasfar as 
you are partakers of the sufferings 
of Christ, rejoice that you may also 
rejoice with exultation in the rev- 
elation of His glory." (I Peter, 
4:12-13) "Unto this, indeed, you 
have been called because Christ also 
suffered for you, leaving you an 
example that you may follow in 
His steps." (I Peter. 2:21) For a 
greater reason do we find suffering 
in the lives of our own religious 



137 



brethren who are nailed with 
Christ to the cross. Some are 
called to suffer and to work con- 
currently ; some are called to suffer 
after their life's work has been 
accomplished. Some are called for- 
mally to the Apostolate of Suffer- 
ing: this is to be their life's work. 
Such we may say was the life 
of Father Sebastian. 

The call to this apostolate came 
suddenly and unexpectedly to Fa- 
ther Sebastian one Sunday early 
in Lent in the year 1934 while he 
was a member of Holy Cross Com- 
munity in Cincinnati, Ohio. He 
had gone to Dayton, Ohio to help 
out on Sunday at Holy Angels' 
parish. Early Sunday morning he 
was awakened from sleep by agon- 
izing pain. Saying Mass was out 
of the question that Sunday and 
for weeks afterwards. Father 
Sebastian was taken to the hos- 
pital, and after examination was 
operated on for the removal of 
kidney stones. So critical was his 
condition that he himself told us 
later on that rumors of his death 
got abroad and prayers were of- 
fered for the repose of his soul. 
Later on he was obliged to submit 
to a second operation ; this too was 
so critical that for a few days he 
hovered between life and death. 
His heart never recovered from the 
strain of all this. This was Fa- 
ther Sebastian's entry into his 
life's work. 

People with defective eyesight 



can be supplied with normal vision 
by glasses. People suffering from 
tuberculosis can recover by a 
change of climate. Diet will help 
one sufferer, surgery will help an- 
other. No artificial devices, how- 
ever, have yet been invented where- 
by a physician might strengthen 
the weakened muscles of the human 
heart. And if a change of climate 
might prove beneficial, the patient, 
may be either unwilling or unable 
to take advantage of it. The usual 
prescription which alone can be of 
any lasting benefit to a failing 
heart is rest; and anyone who has 
taken that prescription knows how 
intolerable it can soon become. 
Father Sebastian was a priest for 
only seven years, he was only thir- 
ty-five years of age, when he was 
first stricken. It was his first ex- 
perience with serious illness. Fa- 
ther Sebastian was one who was 
always ready and eager to be up 
and doing ; he wanted to get things 
done. He was active, at times even 
impetuous and vehement. Father 
Sebastian may well be described 
as a devoted guardian of Time. 
He not only wanted to get things 
done, but they must be done at 
the prescribed time and within a 
definite limit of time. He used to 
look after the community clock, and 
his own watch was rigorously set 
and faithfully kept to the second. 
This was all clearly manifest in his 
exactitude in keeping appoint- 
ments, in his promptness at start- 



138 



ing and finishing Mass on time. 
Yet he who wanted to get things 
done must resign himself now to 
the realization that nothing could 
be done for him. He who was so 
active must curb his natural quick- 
ness of movement; one thought- 
less dash up a staircase might 
prove fatal. And for all of his 
exactitude in the use of time he 
must now wait in patience in the 
infirmary for his strength to re- 
cover according as God might will. 

We read in the lives of many of 
the martyrs that they were thrown 
to wild beasts in the ampitheaters ; 
the beasts cringing at the feet of 
the martyrs left them unharmed. 
Then these blessed martyrs of God 
were pitched from cliffs ; they were 
picked up unharmed. Fires were 
enkindled around them as they 
were tied to the stake; the flames 
did them no harm. Finally, they 
were put to death by the sword. 
Although physically they died but 
once, they faced death as a matter 
of fact many times in imitation of 
their divine Master Who suffered 
the agonies of death in Gethsemani, 
at the scourging, and along the 
road to Calvary where He suffered 
death physically but once. In some 
sense we may say the same of 
Father Sebastian's great suffer- 
ings. It is true, he actually suf- 
fered death but once; yet he faced 
death at least three times during 
his long illness and over the four- 
teen years of its duration he never 



knew from one day to another 
when he would be called upon to 
face it again. As it is written : 
"For thy sake we are put to death 
all the day long." (Rom. 8:36) 

Father Sebastian suffered not 
only from the severity of his Apos- 
tolate, but also from its loneliness. 
He was truly a religious, for he 
loved community life and his re- 
ligious brethren, and he enjoyed 
their society and the common life 
of the monastery. His disposition 
was naturally fitted for community 
life; he was always smiling, he 
was cheerful and lighthearted, 
buoyant with good spirits. Yet for 
all of that, or, perhaps because of 
that, he felt deeply ; for he was 
sensitive. Father Sebastian spent 
many weeks as a patient in vari- 
ous hospitals. Though these insti- 
tutions were all conducted by re- 
ligious communities of nuns and 
brothers, and though the nurses 
and doctors manifested a particu- 
lar interest in his case because of 
his priesthood, he soon realized 
what a lonely place a hospital can 
be for a religious accustomed to 
community life. For the most part 
these hospitals were crowded, and 
the hospital staff had hundreds of 
other patients to take care of : 
Father Sebastian was only one. 
Naturally he would be left to him- 
self a great deal of the time. Fa- 
ther Sebastian spent many weeks 
in our own infirmaries. He had, 
indeed, his interests and his hob- 



139 



bies to occupy his time; he spent 
his time at prayer, in the recita- 
tion of his office, and in his own 
private devotions. Even, however, 
in a monastery infirmary a re- 
ligious who is ailing may easily 
feel this loneliness of soul. The 
community bell rings for the vari- 
ous acts of the common observance, 
the brothers must go to their vari- 
ous tasks, the students have their 
classes, the priests of the commun- 
ity come and go on their various 
assignments. It is not surprising, 
therefore, that Father Sebastian 
could have thought : If only I could 
get back my strength and join 
them. The very nature of his suf- 
ferings emphasized this loneliness. 
There were scarcely any outward 
signs of Father's critical condition. 
It is true he may have lost a little 
weight; he walked a little more 
slowly. But as a matter of fact, 
visible evidence of his illness was 
not at all obvious until the hot 
summer days shortly before his 
death, when there appeared in his 
face a telltale wan and worn look. 
He felt his inability to do any- 
thing like work, to be a bread- 
winner, as he would have put it. 
At times we wonder if there did 
not come into his heart a fear 
that people who would pity and 
help him were he blind, might 
now just wonder. The shock all 
experienced when he died was evi- 
dence that those who saw him, or 
we who lived with him, scarcely 



realized the gravity of his condi- 
tion. 

Father Sebastian's Apostolate 
was, finally, meritorious. Good 
people, and even Father Sebastian 
himself, may have regretted that 
he had never been sent out, for 
example, to conduct missions. When 
our missionaries all over the world, 
whether singly or in groups, go 
forth with a mission cross to 
preach Christ Crucified, they never 
go alone: the Congregation goes 
with them. The symbol of this is 
the book of the Holy Rules which 
they are required to bring with 
them. Father Sebastian, accord- 
ingly, though unseen was a con- 
stant companion of every mission- 
ary on every mission throughout 
the world. By his sufferings he 
merited blessings from God upon 
the missionaries actually engaged 
in the work and also upon the 
numerous crowds of people flock- 
ing to make the missions. Any 
priest who has ever preached a 
mission knows his absolute depen- 
dence upon God for his own soul's 
sake and for the sake of those to 
whom he is preaching. Well might 
Father Sebastian repeat these 
words of St. Paul: "I rejoice now 
in the sufferings I bear for your 
sake: and what is lacking of the 
sufferings of Christ I fill up in 
my flesh for His body, which is 
the Church ; whose minister I have 
become in virtue of the office that 



140 



God has given me in your regard." 
(Col. 1:24-25) 

God is the sanctifier of souls : 
"For it is God who of his good 
pleasure works in you both the will 
and the performance." (Phil. 2:13) 
The Book of Ecclesiasticus tells us 
that God, the sanctifier of souls, is 
like a potter moulding the souls of 
his creatures in holiness. We who 
lived with Father Sebastian were 
like spectators standing around the 
divine Potter in admiration of the 
sureness of divine Wisdom, the ef- 
fortless ease of divine Power, and 
the beauty of the divine plan as 
God moulded this chosen soul into 
the likness of His own Son. We 
were also in admiration of Father 
Sebastian. He was truly clay in 
the hands of God. Whatever God 
wanted to do with him, was what 
Father Sebastian wanted. In other 
words, he was utterly submissive 
and obedient to the will of God. 
There was no striving to escape 
from the will of God; there was 
no evading the will of God; there 
was no resisting the will of God. 
"Does the object moulded say to 
him who moulded it: Why hast 
thou made me thus? Or is not the 
potter master of his clay, to make 
from the same mass one vessel for 
honorable, another for ignoble 
use?" (Rom. 9:20-21) 

The reason for all this inspira- 
tion for holiness upon others from 
the sufferings of Father Sebastian 
lies in the fact that these suffer- 



ings brought holiness to his own 
soul first. Those who knew Father 
Sebastian well observed how God 
sanctified him by suffering. There 
was a noticeable perfecting of his 
own interior life. Once more in 
the beautiful words of St. Paul we 
may read a meaning that may well 
be applied to Father Sebastian: 
"For this reason I bend my knees 
to the Father of our Lord Jesus 
Christ, from whom all fatherhood 
in heaven and on earth receives its 
name, that he may grant you from 
his glorious riches to be strength- 
ened with power through his Spirit 
unto the progress of the inner 
man; and to have Christ dwelling 
through faith in your hearts : so 
that, being rooted and grounded in 
love, you may be able to compre- 
hend with all the saints what is 
the breadth and length and height 
and depth, and to know Christ's 
love which surpasses knowledge, in 
order that you may be filled unto 
all the fullness of God." (Eph. 
3:14-19) This fullness was so a- 
bundant that it was diffused from 
the inward depths of the soul over 
even the outward senses. Father 
Sebastian's last years were calm, 
serene, secure, peaceful. 

We often regret that there is 
such little evidence of the interior 
life of our brethren. Those of us 
who have spent some years in re- 
ligion can appreciate the remarks 
made about the Little Flower while 
she was still alive by some of the 



141 



older members of her community, 
remarks incidentally which the Lit- 
tle Flower herself overheard: 
"What will our Mother write about 
this little sister after she has 
died?" Yet the evidence is there: 
we may say this evidence is like 
footprints along a trail. Though 
superficial, these footprints are 
very important, for they lead us to 
what we are seeking. They are not 
isolated, there is a series of them, 
one after another. And oftentimes 
they are hard even to see, much 
more to follow. When Father 
Sebastian was carried from his 
room on a stretcher to be taken to 
the hospital, he himself made a 
deliberate choice of the articles 
which he would bring with him: 
these articles were his rosary and 
his crucifix. It may be said that 
there was not much else that he 
could bring; it may be said that 
this is only elaborating a point of 
detail. The reason why Father 
Sebastian deliberately chose these 
articles is that the devotions which 
they symbolize were uppermost in 
his mind and in his heart and in 
his soul, devotion to our Blessed 
Mother and to the Passion of our 
Lord. We will remember Father 
Sebastian for many virtues, but 
especially for his fraternal charity. 
As has been said previously, he 
was a great community man, a 
lover of the Congregation and of 
his religious brethren. There was 
no standing, therefore, on his dig- 



nity or seniority when there was 
a question of helping the communi- 
ty or his brethren. He was most 
devoted to his priestly duties. 
Every rector can bear witness to 
the great help Father Sebastian 
rendered in his eagerness, even, to 
do anything that he could to help 
souls, saying Mass for the people, 
hearing confessions, going out to 
conduct Forty Hours Devotions or 
other short spiritual exercises. For 
some time while in Cincinnati he 
was in charge of the Father Walter 
Guild, an association of the laity 
who are interested in raising funds 
for our missions to China. He was 
not content, however, with doing 
his priestly work. Though his 
hands had been anointed to bless, 
to consecrate, and to sanctify, he 
did not think it beneath his dignity 
as a priest to hold in those hands 
the hammer of a carpenter or the 
plumber's wrench. His charity to 
others was noticeable when anyone 
was ill. He used his influence as 
a priest with Catholic physicians 
to provide medical care for poor 
people outside the monastery. 
Knowing from his own experience 
what it meant to be ill, he was 
most devoted to the sick in our 
own infirmaries. There was always 
noticed in Father Sebastian a cour- 
tesy, a consideration for our older 
religious and for the aged. Many 
times he was heard quietly relat- 
ing to younger priests words of 
praise spoken of them by his own 



142 



acquaintances and friends among 
the laity who had heard these 
young priests preach. We think, in 
this connection, of the words of 
our Lord to St. Peter at the Last 
Supper: "What I do thou knowest 
not now; but thou shalt know 
hereafter." (John 13:7) For often- 
times it is only in the silence and 
majesty of death that we see these 
footsteps of God, the Sanctifier of 
souls, leading us straight into the 
interior life of our religious. 

Father Sebastian was at recre- 
ation after dinner on the 14th of 
August and went to his room when 
the bell rang for siesta. One of 
the priests passing down the cor- 
ridor shortly afterwards heard 
him moaning. He had suffered his 
last and severest heart attack; his 
apostolate was to end as it had 
begun, suddenly and unexpectedly. 
The Rector and several of the 
priests came to his rescue and Doc- 
tor Lally, his physician, was called. 
An inhalator squad was summoned 
from the Chicago Fire Department. 
Characteristically of Father Sebas- 
tian's alert mind, in all of the ex- 
citement, he himself requested the 
Rector to anoint him. He was 
taken to the Alexian Brothers' 
Hospital where he passed to his 
eternal reward shortly before the 
third bell rang for Compline. 

Father Sebastian's funeral took 
place at the Immaculate Concep- 
tion Parish Church attached to our 



retreat, on Tuesday morning, Aug- 
ust 17. Besides the religious of 
the community and his own broth- 
ers from Cleveland, there was a 
considerable number of priests and 
laity present. He was honored in 
death as few Passionists have been 
honored, by the presence of our 
Most Reverend Father General, Fa- 
ther Albert of the Sorrowful Vir- 
gin, who had just arrived in Chi- 
cago for the Visitation. Father 
Sebastian was laid to rest in the 
little cemetery on the monastery 
grounds, beside Father Jude, whom 
he had lovingly assisted at the hour 
of death only four months before. 
A sudden storm arose as the funer- 
al procession made its way to the 
graveside, and as the last prayers 
were being recited, the rain burst 
on all in torrents. We could not 
help think how Father Sebastian 
would have insisted upon haste to 
have it over with, from the con- 
sideration of the comfort of the 
many priests and religious stand- 
ing there without shelter. His 
valiant patron, St. Sebastian, our 
Holy Founder, and our Blessed 
Mother would present him for his 
reward to our Divine Lord Who 
had called him to live and to suffer 
in the Congregation of His Passion. 

"Transivimus per ignem et aquam: 
et eduxisti nos in refrigerium." 

"We have passed through fire and 
water, and thou hast brought us 
out into a refreshment." 

Psalm 65. 12 



143 



Alexander of St. Paul of the Cross 



/^N September 27, 1948, the 
^■^ Angel of Death again visited 
St. Gabriel's Monastery, Des 
Moines, Iowa; the fifth time in 
twenty-five years. This time the 
Religious to whom he was sent was 
a surprise to no one, as he was the 
oldest and most infirm member of 
the community. 

Father Alexander Kilgour had 
been in poor health for over ten 
years. For the last five of these 
years his steadily growing infirmi- 
ties had made of him a gradually 
failing invalid. Deafness, heart 
failure, poor circulation and finally 
a cancerous condition of the stom- 
ach united to sap his powerful 
frame. He had been frequently 
ordered to the hospital by his phy- 
sician ; only to return, time and 
again, at his own insistence, to 
his beloved monastery. In August 
of 1948 he entered the hospital 
once more for another "check up"; 




Father Alexander 



never to return. To the combina 
tion of previous afflictions there 
was added a final blow on Sep- 
tember 18th, a paralytic stroke 
causing immobility of the right 
side and depriving him of the pow- 
er of speech. All these united 
proved too much even for his pow- 
erful physique, and on September 
27th at 5:15 in the evening, he 
quietly breathed his last. 

Father Alexander was born July 
14, 1875, in Cincinnati, Ohio, the 
third of eleven children of John 
Kilgour and Margaret Ryan. He 
was given the name John two days 
later in baptism in St. Xavier's 
Church. At the time this was the 
"Irish" section of Cincinnati, a 
neighborhood known for its faith 
and toughness. Here John Kilgour 
grew up, the acknowledged leader 
of the boys of his age, his character 
being molded for life. But in his 
early years he accepted the invita- 
tion of his Divine Master, and be- 
gan his studies for the Passionist 
priesthood. In 1889 at the age of 
fourteen he entered the Passionist 
Preparatory Seminary at Dunkirk, 
New York. He made his novitiate 
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, tak- 
ing his religious vows July 17, 
1891. 

Father Alexander's first assign- 
ment as a priest was to the pas- 
torate of St. Ann's Parish, Nor- 
mandy, Missouri, but his tenure 
there was very brief. His temper- 






144 



ament caused frequent clashes with 
the Rector, Father Robert McNa- 
mara, over the ill-defined jurisdic- 
tion of rector and pastor of those 
days, and a change was soon judged 
advisable. But his strong consti- 
tution, brilliant mind and natural 
eloquence had already marked him 
for the specific work of the Pas- 
sionist; the giving of Missions and 
Retreats. He gave his first mission 
in 1902 at Elizabethtown, Ken- 
tucky and soon followed that with 
another in the "Old" Cathedral at 
Bardstown, Kentucky. Both these 
missions he gave by himself, an 
unusual experience for a young 
missionary of those days. 

As a missionary Father Alex- 
ander was an immediate success, 
and he continued in this work of 
giving missions to the people and 
retreats to the clergy and religious 
for more than thirty years. His 
superiors long ago lost track of 
the missions and retreats he con- 
ducted, and only God knows the 
fruits of his labors. 

As a missionary he was ever in 
demand being particularly effective 
in his work with men. But, as 
many who heard him can testify, 
he was far from ineffective in his 
work for women. He was often 
requested for retreats to women, 
religious and lay, and many a soul 
owes her return to God and prog- 
ress on the way to sanctity to his 
preaching and advice. To cite but 
one example : the present superior 



of the Mercy Sisters' Hospital in 
Des Moines received the gift of 
faith and her religious vocation 
through a mission by Father Al- 
exander which she attended as a 
young woman. 

But it was with men that he 
was most effective. His powerful 
eloquence and warm sympathy stir- 
ring them to repentance and en- 
couraging them to return to the 
sacraments. 

Many are the stories told about 
the appeal of his words; often, so 
sweeping the men from themselves 
that they forgot where they were. 
For instance, the late P. H. Brad- 
ley, one time pastor of the Blessed 
Sacrament Church, St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, used frequently to tell how, 
during one of Father Alexander's 
sermons, towards the end of his 
missionary career, a laboring man 
in his congregation so forgot him- 
self, in his near ecstatic attention 
to the orator on the mission plat- 
form, that he reached into his 
pocket, took out his pipe, filled it 
with tobacco and was about to 
strike a match to it, when an usher 
■awakened him to his surroundings. 

During World War I Father Al- 
exander served with the Army, at 
first as a "K of C" chaplain. But 
he was soon in conflict with the 
policies of that organization, then 
dictated by the well known "Col." 
P. H. Callahan of Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, (later to become head of 
-the Catholic Prohibition Party.) 



145 



Their plan seemed to Father Alex- 
ander to be but a slavish following 
of the ideas of the "YMCA" and 
the Methodist Church: forbidding 
card playing, dancing, etc., in the 
soldier's recreation halls. So he 
soon applied for, and received, a 
commission as a regular army 
chaplain. 

He was stationed at Camp Sheri- 
dan, Alabama; Gerstner Field, 
Louisiana, Camp Beauregard, La.; 
and Camp Hope, North Carolina. 
In all these camps he was out- 
standing in his labors for his men, 
winning high praise for his devo- 
tion to duty, especially during the 
terrible days of the "Flu" epi- 
demic. 

On June 2, 1948, Father Alexan- 
der celebrated the golden jubilee of 
his ordination. He himself was too 
feeble to celebrate Mass that day, 
so it was offered for him by the 
Very Reverend Father Provincial, 
in the presence of His Excellency, 
Most Reverend Edward C. Daly 
and many priests, our own and 
diocesan, and a chapel filled to over- 
flowing with the religious and laity 
of Des Moines. 

At the Mass that day, the orator 
of the occasion, Father Ignatius 
Conroy, C.P., eloquently said, "As 
God has privileged you above many 
who were ordained with you fifty 
years ago, our prayer for you, to- 
day, is that in the book of life, 
God has again privileged you that 
your name is among his favorite 



ones; to that when, in His own 
good time, He calls you, that call 
will be to come home to Him where 
jubilees do not run in cycles and 
are not known as silver or golden 
but as eternal as God Himself." 

His words were prophetic to the 
surprise of none. In four short 
months Father Alexander had gone 
home, we trust, to the jubilee that 
will endure throughout the eternal 
years of God. 

Father Alexander presents a 
character difficult to analyze and 
too complex to summarize ade- 
quately in a brief obituary notice. 
The over-worked expression "Dia- 
mond in the Rough" spontaneously 
presents itself to the mind when 
one thinks of him. Too often is 
this phrase used as a charitable 
excuse for crudeness and unkind- 
ness of character. To those who 
had the privilege of knowing Fa- 
ther Alexander, in his case the 
roughness was but a thin veneer 
scarcely disguising the sterling 
character beneath. 

Many of his fellow religious 
considered Father Alexander to be 
rather inclined to uncharitableness. 
They who truly knew him, how- 
ever, realized the opposite was ac- 
tually the truth. He was as kind 
and gentle-hearted as a woman, 
quick to sympathize, easily moved 
to tears, and ever ready to make 
another's troubles his own. He 
had a horror of sham and deceit 
and was perhaps too quick to con- 



146 



demn these when he saw, or 
thought he saw, them. But he was 
just as quick to recognize merit 
and lavish praise where he thought 
it due. 

The real measure of his charity 
can be found in his zeal for souls, 
and for souls he spent himself 
unstintingly. When age and in- 
firmities put an end to his active 
ministry, this zeal for souls still 
drove him on, and found its outlet 
in the effort to inspire and guide 
the labors of younger men; to in- 
still into them his own exalted 
concept of the ministry and high 
ideals of the Passionist Mission- 
ary. Fortunate were they who were 
privileged to learn the secrets of 
the successful missionary career 
at the feet of such a master! So 
helpful were his efforts and in- 
spiring his example that it was 
remarked a year or so before he 
died by one who knew him well, 
"Father Alexander is doing the 
best work of his life now at the 
end of his days." 

Let us point out but one aspect 
of his inner religious life before 
bringing this sketch to a close: 
His childlike love and devotion to 
Mary, the Mother of all Passion- 
ists. Frequent was his mention of 



her, and most affectionate his al- 
lusions. The greatest disappoint- 
ment of his last days was the 
failure of his dream to compose, or 
compile, a book of fitting medita- 
tions on the "Sorrows of Mary" 
for the use of our religious. To 
the very end of his life he desired 
this, and to the last, he talked of 
it. Maybe, some day, the seed he 
sowed will sprout, and bear fruit 
to her glory and his memory. 

Father Alexander had faults, 
yes, many of them. He would be 
the first and the loudest to con- 
demn any attempt to deny or color 
them. But his faults were external 
and defects of temperament. They 
can well be left to the judgment 
of a merciful God for whose glory 
he labored so long and so hard. 
To quote again from the eloquent 
funeral address of Father Igna- 
tius, "His very faults served to 
make him an humble man and 
served likewise as an incentive to 
make him build the better for 
eternity." 

We can all well be inspired to 
emulate the example of his virtue 
and zeal and to pray for the speedy 
remission of his faults and short- 
comings. 

May he rest in peace. 



Mary Catherine of the Sorrowful Virgin 

THE FEAST of the Holy Sepul- for our dear Mother Vicar, Mary 
chre, which in this present year, Catherine, the end of her earthly 
1948, occurred on April 9th, and exile, and at 8:15 P.M. our Mother 
which coincided with another feast, rendered her soul to her Creator, 
namely, St. Mary Cleophas, marked Mother Mary Catherine, known 



147 



in the world as Lavina Scoretti, 
was born January 16th, 1873, (just 
two weeks after St. Therese, the 
"Little Flower") at Poggio Mojano, 
near Rome. Her parents were pious 
and well-to-do, and reared their 
children in the fear and love of 
God. Lavina had two brothers who 
were very fond of their sister. She 
was educated in the public school 
of the city. She could not bear to 
be separated from her mother, 
which prevented her from attend- 
ing the convent schools in the ad- 
joining cities. 

Her mother was a great benefac- 
tor of the Passionist Fathers. In 
their travels to and fro to give 
Missions and Retreats, they were 
gladly given hospitality at the 
home, where the mother put an 
apartment at their disposal, and 
almost every day one or more of 
the Passionist Fathers would stop 
there. 

It was through the Passionist 
Fathers and her close connection 
with them, that young Lavina 
learned of the Passionist Nuns, 
their Rule and manner of life, and 
began to admire and esteem it. 

One time at a Mission given in 
the Parish Church by the Passion- 
ist Fathers, young Lavina was 
proudly seated in the first pew, 
eagerly taking in every word of 
the sermon, in the midst of which 
the Father began to speak about 
the vanity of dress, etc., and she 
felt it applied to her. After the 

148 



services, going home angry, she 
told her mother not to give that 
priest any dinner that day. When 
the Father came to the home, the 
mother mentioned it to him and 
he calmly replied : "Never mind, I'll 
say even more at another time," 
and he did, for at the next sermon 
he spoke again about vanity of 
dress, etc., in even stronger terms. 
Instead of getting angry this time, 
it started her to thinking about 
the vanity of the world, the noth- 
ingness of it all, and realizing 
Solomon's words: "Vanity of vani- 
ty and all is vanity," she decided 
to get away from it all and con- 
secrate herself entirely to God in 
Holy Religion, at the early age 
of nineteen. 

At first she thought about en- 
tering a very austere Order like 
the Trappistines, but the Fathers 
advised her, since she felt herself 
called by God to a Contemplative 
life, to enter the Passionist Com- 
munity at Corneto, now known as 
Tarquinia, but they did not fail to 
add — "You will never stay there, 
because you are too much of a 
mischief-maker and too fond of 
your mother," and all her relatives 
agreed to the same statement, and 
likewise reminded her of her re- 
fusal to go to a boarding school, 
because she could not leave her 
mother for one night, and that 
now she wanted to leave her moth 
er entirely. 

But grace triumphed over na- 






ture, and Lavina entered the con- 
vent on Oct. 28th 1891. Her health 
was not of the best, and she was 
not vested until Feb. 14th, 1893, 
and made profession of perpetual 
vows on August 5th, 1894. 

After Mother's profession, she 
was assigned to the Offices of 
assistant Infirmarian, Oeconome, 
and for the nineteen years she 
spent in Corneto until 1910, most 
of the time she was appointed to 
either of these Offices. 

In 1901, the Very Rev. Father 
Joseph Amrhein, C.P., 2nd Consul- 
tor General from the Province of 
St. Paul of the Cross, was appoint- 
ed to give the Retreat to the Nuns 
at the Convent of the Presentation 
in Corneto. He also came at the 
request of Very Rev. Father Stan- 
islaus, Provincial of the Province 
of St. Paul of the Cross, to ask 
for a group of Nuns to establish 
the Passionist Nuns in the United 
States. 

Mother Mary Catherine was one 
of the five chosen. The edification 
and fervor Mother Catherine had 
ever manifested in the Observance, 
caused her to be selected by the 
Very Rev. Father Consultor to be 
Mistress of Novices for the new 
foundation. 

On April 14th, 1910, Very Rev. 
Father Joseph, with the group of 
five religious departed from their 
convent home for far off America, 
arriving in New York on April 
27th, the vigil of the feast of our 



Holy Founder, St. Paul of the 
Cross. The Nuns were filled with 
zeal, and, as Mother Catherine 
wrote, "For Jesus, for love of Him 
and to make Him known and loved 
to many souls who will be con- 
fided to us. Since they were en- 
tirely unacquainted with the lan- 
guage, except "Yes" and "No", it 
was arranged for them to stay 
with the Sisters of St. Francis on 
Pius St., S.S., Pittsburgh, whilst 
their temporary convent was being 
arranged, and also that these good 
Sisters might teach them English. 

Our first Mothers took possession 
of their temporary convent on July 
9th, 1910. The following day the 
Enclosure was established to their 
great delight to be again enclosed 
in their convent home. At the be- 
ginning Mother Catherine had 
three postulants, and when the new 
convent was opened and the years 
went on the number kept increas- 
ing and truly Mother had her hands 
full. She was always on the alert; 
a new phrase or expression aroused 
her interest and she quickly found 
an occasion to use it. Mother 
Catherine manifested real ability 
with consummate prudence in the 
Office of Mistress. Her maternal 
heart had understanding for each 
and every one of her children; she 
won their hearts and helped them 
to grow in love for their Passionist 
vocation. She impressed upon the 
novices the great importance of the 
Divine Office, in fact, Mother never 



149 



ceased until the end of her life to 
have at heart this great work of 
God. Her talents were above the 
ordinary, and she practiced the vir- 
tue of diligence with the utmost 
perfection. Because of these two 
excellent qualities, the Novices 
were taught sewing, all kinds of 
embroidery and fancy work, paint- 
ing, etc. 

After three years spent as Mis- 
tress, Mother held the office of 
Oeconome, the Mistress of Nov- 
ices again — the last fourteen years 
of her life she was Vicar. The 
kindness and thoughtful solicitude 
Mother had manifested during the 
early years as Mistress, showed it- 
self with even greater love and 
devotedness now — she remembered 
the members of the families of the 
religious and was heartily and sin- 
cerely interested in each and all 
of them. 

Mother Catherine was a real 
Religious, the Observance meant 
everything to her. The following 
passage from the diary she wrote 
during her Golden Jubilee year, 
is an expression of her love for 
the observance. We quote it just 
as she wrote it in her own way in 
English: "Tonight I have miss 
Matins because Mother let me stay 
for the cold, patience. My, this 
cold is a very nice one, and may be 
I have to miss my sweet Matins. 
Oh! no thing on hearth may give 
me what I get at Matins time, more 
I live and more I realize what 



privileges is ours to get up a Mat- 
tins and sing the Divine Office 
and how is pleasing to God such 
Divine Esercise, because I have es- 
perience, long esperience to get 
great graces from Jesus in the 
Blessed Sacrament and I am happy, 
very happy, when I am able to go 
a Matins. But when I do not get 
up for any reason, I feel that some- 
thing is wanting to me all day 
long. Oh my God, who is in all 
world may take your place?" 

Mother's charity seemed to be 
boundless ; as long as she was able, 
she assisted the Religious in their 
various duties and charges; she 
delighted in doing favors for oth- 
ers, and every Office experienced 
her charity. She would bake in the 
Host Room, fold in the Linen 
Room and many times while the 
Religious were taking their siesta, 
she would go downstairs and wash 
all the dishes of the Retreatants, 
which are left to be done after 
Vespers, in order not to deprive 
the Sisters of recreation. One can 
imagine the pleasant surprise a- 
waiting the Sisters after Vespers. 

An unusual, happy event was the 
great day of Mother's Golden Ju- 
bilee of Profession on August 5th, 
1944. His Excellency, Bishop Boyle 
of Pittsburgh came for the cele- 
bration. Very Rev. Father Rector, 
Father Leonard, left nothing un- 
done to make it a real Jubilee cele- 
bration. Very Rev. Father Berch- 
mans preached and it was all that 



150 



could be desired. His Reverence 
addressed Mother as "Carissima 
Norma." Dear Mother said after- 
wards she was ready to run. 
Friends and acquaintances were le- 
gions in calling on our dear Moth- 
er Catherine on this occasion, and 
it made Mother more than happy, 
and she rejoiced to be able to keep 
the observance at that age. Her 
joy and her spirit of cheerfulness 
was communicative at all times. At 
recreation she had the best part in 
keeping all in the most cheerful 
spirit; sometimes by imitating the 
way of speaking, working, etc., of 
the religious, but especially by re- 
peating the new words that she 
heard in her simple way. 

Mother had several sick spells 
during her life. At one time it 
was only through the intercession 
of the Little Flower that an opera- 
tion was avoided. After her sev- 
entieth year, Mother's health failed 
perceptibly. Several physicians de- 
clared that they could do nothing 
unless they had X-Ray pictures. 
It was only because she felt and 
we believed she was at death's door 
that she consented to go to the 
hospital. Thanks be to God, it was 
like a new lease on life for her — 
she returned home from the hospi- 
tal on Palm Sunday and rose for 
Matins on Easter Sunday. Her 
health continued for two years and 
again her strength failed. The 
same decision of the doctors obliged 
Mother to make a second trip to 



St. Joseph's Hospital. There, as 
at home, Mother won every heart, 
everybody loved her, and her amus- 
ing remarks were carried from one 
floor to another. Mother had to 
return to the hospital for the re- 
moval of a growth of which she 
made no mention before. Mother 
returned from the hospital on 
March 19th, and from then until 
Easter Sunday she appeared to be 
getting along quite well — she was 
up several hours each day, and by 
placing a small table in front of 
her, she could eat her meals very 
nicely without a great deal of 
assistance, but Easter Saturday 
brought a noticeable change. Moth- 
er lost all relish for food, and dur- 
ing the following week her condi- 
tion became steadily worse, and she 
was anointed on the Sunday after 
Easter. Mother was not able to 
receive Viaticum, either that day 
or later, owing to the difficulty she 
experienced when trying to swal- 
low. Each day the following week 
death seemed to come nearer, until 
Friday, when she returned her soul 
to God (see note). On Sunday a- 
bout 11 :45 a.m., the body was tak- 
en to the choir, where it could be 
viewed by the public until 9:00 
P.M. Despite the torrents of rain, 
a constant stream of friends were 
coming and going all day Sunday, 
right up to the time for closing 
the Chapel. Many of these friends 
were from far outside Pittsburgh 
— they heard the news over the 



151 



radio, as Rev. Father Cox asked 
the prayers for her soul during 
the Mass which he broadcasts 
every Sunday. 

The rain kept pouring down all 
Sunday night, and there was no 
sign of it letting up as late as 
9 A.M. Monday. We were all bound 
we would go to the cemetery de- 
spite the rain but we felt sure our 
Blessed Mother would make the 
rain cease, at least, before it was 
time to take the corpse out. We 
lit the blessed candles before her 
statue for this purpose and said 
many prayers. She who never fails 
did not fail us on this occasion. 
Just as the Solemn High Mass 
began, the sky brightened a little 
and when it came time for the 
procession to the cemetery, the 
rain had entirely ceased. 

The Solemn Mass was sung by 
Very Rev. Father Rector, C.P., 
with Very Rev. Father Master as 
Deacon, and Rev. Father Clement, 
C.P., as Subdeacon. Father Ken- 
neth was Master of Ceremonies. 
The Mass was rendered by the 
Novices' Choir without an organ, 
and was most beautiful. Mass be- 
ing ended, the four priests and 
six pall-bearers came inside the 
enclosure to accompany the casket. 

It has been said : "Blessed the 
corpse the rain falls on," and if 
this be true, then our dear Mother 
Vicar was truly "Blesed" because 
the men had just completed cov- 
ering the grave when the rain be- 



gan anew, continuing all Monday 
night. 

Mother is laid to rest beside 
Mother Rose in our little cemetery 
and may she intercede for all of 
us who still have to traverse the 
way she has gone, and may it be 
granted us to have deaths like hers, 
which was really an enviable one. 
R. I. P. 

NOTE: Father Confessor had been 
in about three P.M. to give Mother 
conditional absolution and she con- 
tinued just about the same until 
immediately after the Community 
came up from supper. A visible 
change took place just about seven 
o'clock. Mother Superior hastened 
to summon Rev. Father Norman, 
C.P., who was just ready to begin 
his conference to nurses who were 
here for a Retreat. Father came 
with all speed and after giving 
another absolution, began the 
prayers for the dying. One of us 
held the crucifix to Mother's lips, 
another held the lighted candle in 
her hand, and another kept sprin- 
kling her with holy water from 
time to time. Father Norman 
prayed for fully half an hour, and 
then went to deliver his discourse 
to the nurses, telling us he would 
be back later, as Mother might 
linger that way for hours. 

After Father's departure, some- 
thing seemed to tell us Mother 
was not going to last too long, so 
we began the recitation of the Fif- 
teen Decade Rosary, followed by 



152 



the Litany. Mother took deeper 
and more labored breaths and just 
as Mother Superior said the words : 



"Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata 
mundi," Mother Vicar closed her 
eyes and was gone. 



Peter of the Mother of Sorrows 

An exception is made hereby in publishing in these pages the Obituary of the member of a 
Province other than our own. After reading it. the reason will be evident. 



A S Archbishop Beovich left the 
** Monastery Church after pay- 
ing his respects to the remains of 
the later Father Peter of the Moth- 
er of Sorrows, he remarked to 
his companion: "I don't think that 
we have heard the last of this 
young man yet." As the news of 
Father Peter's sudden death swept 
over Adelaide and Sydney and far 
beyond, this was the first thought 
that leapt to the minds of all that 
knew him. Subject to any decis- 
ions of the Holy See, all felt that 
he had led a life of heroic sanctity ; 
those who knew him best were 
sure that his soul had gone to 
God, clothed with the robe of inno- 
cence that he had first received 
nearly twenty-nine years before. 

In his panegyric on the follow- 
ing day, the Archbishop likened 
the dead young priest to another 
Passionist, whom the Church hon- 
ors as the Patron of Catholic 
Youth ... St. Gabriel of Our Lady 
of Sorrows. It is a curious coin- 
cidence that both these followers 
of St. Paul of the Cross began 
their lives under the patronage of 
the seraphic St. Francis of Assisi. 
St. Gabriel received the sacrament 
of Baptism at the font in the 
cathedral where St. Francis had 



been baptised four hundred years 
earlier, and the young son of 
Thomas and Alice Dodd received 
the Christian name of Brendan at 
the hands of a son of St. Francis 
in the Friary Church of Waverly, 
N.S.W. 

It was in this parish that he 
was born on the 20th of Septem- 
ber, 1919, bringing happiness and 
joy into a sterling Catholic family, 
poor in this world's goods, but very, 
very rich in faith and devotion. 
It was for this home that Father 
Peter, many years later, thanked 
God for one of His greatest gifts 
to him. 

Brendan, or 'Budge,' as he was 
familiarly known, was not very old 
when his family moved to the Pas- 
sionist parish of Marrickville. It 
was there that he went to school 
and under the careful guidance of 
the Sisters of the Good Samaritan, 
he received his first Holy Com- 
munion at the age of six. From 
the time he was eight years old, 
until his death, he could remember 
only two or three days on which 
he had not received this Holy Sac- 
rament. Every morning, even as 
a child, he was present at the six 
o'clock Mass, which he served with 
his two brothers. This he contin- 



153 



ued to do until he grew too big to 
be an acolyte. 

At the age of fourteen, he was 
sent to the Christian Brothers' 
school at Lewisham to continue his 
education. He was not a brilliant 
student but a plodder. By dint of 
hard work and constant persever- 
ance, he was able to pass all his 
examinations. It was in the realm 
of sports that he excelled. In foot- 
ball, cricket, athletics, he was the 
leader, the captain, the best and 
the fairest player ... a hero to his 
classmates, the companion of them 
all. 

"Brendan won the respect of 
his masters and fellow-students, 
and also their affection, by the 
sterling worth of his character," 
reported the school magazine. "Our 
best player. Elusive as ever at 
five-eight and destined to make his 
name in a higher sphere." In 1936 
he was chosen as the "best and 
fairest" player by the N.S.W. Rug- 
by Football League. He won the 
coveted blazer from all competi- 
tors . . . coming as they did from 
the Catholic Colleges of Sydney. 

During these years, in spite of 
his jovial character and genuine 
friendliness, there was about him 
a quiet reserve. It came partly 
from his character, partly from his 
home training and partly from the 
momentous struggle that was go- 
ing on in his mind. The future 
looked bright and rosy, he could 
make a big name for himself in 



sports and this appealed to the de- 
sire of the heroic in him. But God 
was calling. Could he abandon 
what the world held out to him, 
and what so many prophesied for 
him? It was made up, nothing 
could turn him from his purpose. 
He would leave all to become a 
Passionist. 

On leaving school, he entered the 
Passionist College at St. Ive's and 
there continued his studies until 
the beginning of 1939, when he 
was sent to Mary's Mount, Goul- 
burn to make his novitiate. As a 
sign that he had left all behind 
him, Brendan's name was changed 
to Peter and he took as his devo- 
tion, "The Mother of Sorrows." 

At Goulburn, he proved himself 
as successful in the race for per- 
fection as he had done when fight- 
ing for a corruptible crown. He 
was admitted to Holy Profession 
on the 26th of January, 1940, tak- 
ing the vows of poverty, chastity, 
obedience and the fourth vow to 
promote the devotion to the Sacred 
Passion of Our Lord and Saviour, 
Jesus Christ. 

That same year, he was trans- 
ferred to St. Paul's Retreat, Glen 
Osmond, to continue his studies for 
the priesthood. There he remained 
for the next five years. 

Father Peter's life was all of a 
piece. The traits of character that 
had been developing during his 
formative years, blossomed into 
full maturity in the religious life. 



154 



We are fortunate in possessing his 
spiritual diary. He had been ac- 
customed for years to write down 
his thoughts and aspirations in the 
form of letters to Our Blessed La- 
dy. Many of these he burned, but 
God did not give him the chance 
to destroy them all. As soon as 
the cold hand of death was upon 
him, he became unconscious so that 
he could not ask, as St. Gabriel had 
asked, for the destruction of his 
diary. These letters speak for 
themselves. They show his gradual 
growth towards holiness . . . the su- 
pernatural taking hold of his nat- 
ural gifts, developing them, puri- 
fying them, elevating them, until 
Father Peter had been molded 
into the living image of Christ 
Crucified. 

"Dear Jesus," he wrote, "I de- 
cided when I was out in the bush 
this afternoon to write to you to- 
night, to ask you if you had ever 
been out like we were, hill-climb- 
ing. If you weren't, you missed 
one of the few things really worth- 
while ... a physical tussle. You 
know, you grit your teeth with de- 
termination and want to shout for 
joy because you are happy. I al- 
ways feel you near on such ex- 
peditions." 

"We grit our teeth with deter- 
mination." That was how Father 
Peter's whole life was lived. There 
was a goal to reach, and nothing 
would turn him aside from it. 
Temptation, emotion, feeling, sick- 



ness, even the certainty of death, 
were all to be fought with deter- 
mination so as to achieve his am- 
bition of complete union with God 
. . . the perfection of his priestly 
and religious life. 

"I want to go to the Foreign 
Missions. I want to be like St. 
Paul," he said. "I want to go where 
no man has yet been preaching 
the Gospel. Why should I like the 
rough and tumble of a hard life? 
Why have you given me the health 
of a lion, the strength of a bear 
and the fight of a Roman soldier? 
Jesus, you know, you know every- 
thing. Damien the Leper appeals 
to me, Francis Xavier, and in the 
realm of fiction, Cronin's Father 
Chisholm. With this aim I'd work 
like a nigger. Do everything to 
prepare myself for a savage life. 
Is it zeal? Or is it a natural 
impulse?" 

It was the fire of Divine Charity 
taking hold of his natural impulses, 
enlivening his nature and lifting 
it up above the natural plane. His 
health and strength and fight were 
to be used in a greater struggle — 
the struggle of conquering himself 
and of overcoming circumstances 
that would have, and have, crushed 
many another. 

Speaking of the Little Flower, 
Father Peter admired her, be- 
cause, he said, "you are stubborn, 
mischievous — that mixture of 
gameness and shyness that I like. 
If there is one thing I would have 



155 



enjoyed," he continued, "it would 
have been your trip to Rome. I 
think that escapade to the Colis- 
seum had all the devilry and all 
the cheerfulness and simplicity of 
the fictitious 'Anne of Green Ga- 
bles.' If you did nothing else in 
life, that deed would have made 
you human. I love the simple way 
you got Communion in the House 
of Loretto too ; the way you touched 
the nails; above all, the way you 
spoke up to the Pope — Leo XIII, 
the stern old man of 'Capital and 
Labor.' " 

That describes Father Peter's 
own character better than anyone 
who knew him intimately could 
have done. Always there was that 
simple, childlike directness that en- 
deared him to all — a directness 
that could say what it thought, 
and always with a cheerfulness and 
simplicity which, even when it 
wounded, made one love him all the 
same. For he always played clean. 
He was always the best and fair- 
est. No one could take offence. 

Into such a good seed-bed, pro- 
vided by nature and prepared by 
grace, there had been sown in child- 
hood days the seed of devotion to 
Mary, the Mother of God and of 
men. This seed germinated and 
grew until it became the charac- 
teristic of Father Peter's life and 
spirituality. 

"Dear Mary, Mother," he wrote, 
"I address you, Mary, because I 
believe that this is the way Jesus 



wants us to come to Him — through 
you. Won't you make this an ar- 
ticle of faith? Look what advan- 
tage it would be. Man could just 
determine to preach and pray and 
look to you with the surety of 
faith." 

But whether this truth had been 
defined or not, it affected him lit- 
tle. Mary was his mother ; through 
her he would go to Jesus. "Mary, 
I want to love you furiously," he 
said. He looked to her for every- 
thing, he turned to her in all his 
doubts and difficulties and tempta- 
tions. He loved her and tried to 
make all with whom he came in 
contact love her too. Every day he 
recited the fifteen mysteries of her 
Rosary. He prepared for her feasts 
with the greatest devotion at his 
command. He fasted and abstained 
on Saturday in her honor, and it 
was one of his greatest penances 
to be obedient to a command of 
his superior, forbidding this prac- 
tice during the last months of his 
life. 

As his priesthood drew nearer, 
his thought constantly turned to 
the part Mary was to play in his 
apostolic life. "That old idea of 
going mad on Mariology is back," 
he wrote. "Is it worthwhile con- 
centrating all my faculties to 
spreading devotion to Mary? An- 
swer is, yes. Is it worthwhile 
studying and studying Mariology 
with the view to writing, preach- 
ing, blazing Mary's name over Aus- 



156 



tralia? The answer is, yes — if 
that's the means you want me to 
take, Mary." 

During the few short years of 
his ministry, he lost no opportunity 
for promoting devotion to his 
heavenly Mother. This is what he 
wrote to her concerning his first 
sermon. "I'm preaching on Sunday 
and I'm preaching on the Immacu- 
late Conception, and I want to get 
a crowd at Mass next week for 
you, Mary. I'm going out a trier. 
Mary, please help me. I'm de- 
lighted at the opportunity; you've 
got to help me. .It's my first time 
up. All the mpre reason you should 
help me. I mean you can make 
me stutter and stammer, if you 
like, but be a sport and let us 
gain the end." 

It was particularly Our Lady's 
Sorrows that appealed to him. He 
carried a little picture of Mary at 
the tomb of Jesus from his alum- 
niate days until his death. The 
image of the Sorrowful Mother 
can scarcely be discerned. It has 
almost been obliterated by his 
kisses and the stains of his blood. 

The Sorrowful Virgin taught 
him two things: the value of sanc- 
tifying grace and the heavenly re- 
ward of suffering. All Mary's 
greatness, he knew, was centered 
on her soul filled with grace. He 
wanted his soul to be like hers. 
"Without me you can do nothing," 
he said. "Grace, grace, grace, — 
what can human words, human ear- 



nestness, human zeal, what can 
these things do without grace? 
When your Son, Mary, and Our 
Divine Lord said, 'Mary has chosen 
the better part,' did He merely 
mean it was better because she was 
so close to him, or did he mean 
that it was better, too, insofar as 
it was the best way to touch souls? 
It makes a man want to suffer, 
but it's not the least bit of good, 
me wanting to be like Gemma Gal- 
gani, if God wants me to be some 
ordinary priest that has his trials, 
has his funny ways and gets to 
heaven. Mary, you are God's Prime 
Ministress: you dispense graces; 
be liberal to me, Mary, make me 
cooperate." 

To fill his soul with grace, Father 
Peter would neglect no opportunity. 
He went to confession every day, 
he insisted on saying Mass when- 
ever he could, and two on Sundays 
if he could. He kept his Rule and 
every point of it, because he knew 
that it was a source of grace. He 
wanted to be kind and charitable 
and helpful to all, because in these 
acts he looked for an increase of 
grace. "I want to love . . . with a 
love that is beyond the essence, 
the strength, the capabilities, the 
merit of all and every creature; 
in a word, I want to increase and 
increase in the supernatural virtue 
of charity. Mary, I offer myself 
entirely to thee . . . 'Without me you 
can do nothing.' " 

The grace that was filling his 



157 



soul day by day burst forth in a 
desire for holiness. He knew the 
difficulties to be encountered. But, 
"yes, I can see," he said, "I've got 
to try and do what I don't like 
doing. Forcing myself everywhere 
... I want to work and love ... I 
want to offer every breath to you, 
Mary, to polish up and give to 
Jesus." "I want to have a burn- 
ing, white-hot love of purity and 
all things pure, because God saw 
fit to work a miracle to keep you 
a virgin." "I want to be humble. 
Make me humble, even if you have 
to inject it into me. Let me ap- 
preciate others ; then I'll depreciate 
myself. Help me, Mary." "Gee, I 
want to be humble and I want to 
be good. Give me a hand . . . Let 
me see the uselessness of the world 
and the vanity of all worldliness." 

There was no illusion as to the 
difficulty in becoming holy. Like 
St. Paul of the Cross, Father Peter 
realised that humility is the foun- 
dation of all virtue and perhaps 
the hardest virtue to acquire. 
Therefore he prayed constantly for 
it. "Dear Jesus, don't let me live 
in a fool's paradise. It is easy to 
imagine myself holy and deter- 
mined and good and get ideas. 
Convince me I am a fool and that 
you alone can raise dust and ashes 
up to anything." "Gee, Mary, I 
can see how you have helped me 
along, getting at my own pride. 
Show me more. Soak me in my 
own nothingness and sinfulness." 



"Help me to know myself. Give 
me the honesty to admit my noth- 
ingness. Give me the courage not 
to be disheartened." "If by with- 
drawing His grace and leaving me 
to topple turkey-over-head time and 
time again God wishes to make me 
realise I am nothing and He is all, 
I'm the gainer. Please make me 
humble, Mary. You know that 
meek, humble strength so discon- 
certing when you meet it. Bright, 
happy, joking, etc., but still abso- 
lutely immovable . . . Aren't I the 
hypocrite writing like this?" 

No, he was no hypocrite, for 
that was just how he acted ... al- 
ways ready to admit his mistakes, 
as submissive as a child to obedi- 
ence, ready to forego his own o- 
pinion and judgment in everything, 
doing what was commanded by 
Rule or Superiors. 

But his spirit showed itself best 
of all in the second thing that 
Mary taught him: the value of 
suffering. "Dear Mary, I want to 
be a martyr. If there is any dy- 
ing for virtue in Sydney, Mel- 
bourne, Adelaide or anywhere else, 
see that I'm in it. All other re- 
quests are candle power to the 
brilliance of the sun. Mary, Queen 
of martyrs, don't forget me." 
"Dear Mary, I want to tell you 
about my yearning for mortifica- 
tion and suffering. There are two 
reasons for which I want to hurt 
myself : first, out of sheer love, and, 
secondly, momentary and light . . . 



158 



eternal weight of glory. Dear Mary, 
I believe you can be resigned and 
that is all. You've got to love suf- 
fering with all your heart and 
that isn't possible. I want to suffer 
because suffering is the test of 
love. What I'm prepared to go 
through! I realise that it is im- 
possible to overcome all temptation 
and to lead a Christian life without 
grace. 'Ask and you shall receive.' 
Mary, I want to love you furiously. 
Help me and show me." 

Father Peter's desire for pain 
was not just the morbid desire of 
a highly-strung temperament. His 
desire was founded on a solid doc- 
trinal basis. "Dear Mother," he 
wrote, "it is beginning to dawn on 
me again that I can fill up those 
things that are wanting to the 
sufferings of Christ for the Church. 
Mary, I offer myself. Mary, help 
me. There's me ... I can pray, can 
suffer, can actually fill up those 
things that are wanting in the 
sufferings of Christ for the Church. 
Mary, I offer myself entirely to 
thee, my eyes, ears, mouth, tongue, 
heart and whole self. Since I be- 
long to Thee Good Mother, pre- 
serve and protect me as thy own 
property and possession. It makes 
a man want to suffer and to work 
himself to the bone. Mary, please 
help me." 

This, then, was his desire — to 
prove his love by suffering and to 
help others by the merit of his 
good works. His desire was not to 



be fulfilled in the way he had 
hoped. Martyrdom was not to be 
his. He was to suffer silently and 
in hiding, the little crosses that 
often are harder to bear than the 
great ones. His highly sensitive 
nature felt many things that were 
never intended to hurt. His direct 
and simple manner of speech were 
often misunderstood. There was 
the daily grind of the regular ob- 
servance, which he found hard in 
spite of his love for it, and, added 
to this, the myriad mortifications 
that he inflicted upon himself, un- 
known to all except his director. 

In this way, with these desires 
and aspirations, his student days 
were coming to a close when the 
sacred order of Priesthood was 
conferred on him by the Arch- 
bishop of Adelaide in St. Francis 
Xavier's Cathedral on July 25, 
1945. His diary reveals the senti- 
ments that were his during those 
precious days of preparatory re- 
treat, ordination and First Mass. 

"I haven't discovered anything 
new yet," he wrote during this 
retreat. "It is the same idea of 
sacrifice, the victim. I want to 
offer myself a victim for sinners. 
Gee, I know I've got to make up 
for my own first. But still, I'm 
prepared to take that out in Pur- 
gatory. Mary, Mother, . . . salva- 
tion . . . that is all that matters." 
It was with this heroic purpose in 
view that he became a priest of 
God. The remainder of his life will 



159 



show how God accepted his offer- 
ing and how he became the living 
image of the Victim of Calvary . . . 
dying in the end for the conversion 
of sinners. (N.B. This was war 
time. His father was bedridden. 
His brother killed in R.A.F. over 
Finland.) 

His mother and sister arrived 
in Adelaide to be present at the 
ordination, but he was not allowed 
to see them immediately. "I'm glad, 
as glad as glad it hurt," he wrote 
that night. "A few minutes' meet- 
ing — what's that to an eternal re- 
ward. But I do know a tiny bit 
how Our Lord felt on seeing His 
Mother on the way to Calvary . . . 
Thanks, Mary, I'll fight the world." 

At the end of his theological 
course, he was sent to Marrick- 
ville for his studies in Sacred Elo- 
quence. Towards the end of that 
year, 1946, he was transferred to 
Goulbourn to be Vice-Master of 
Novices for three months. Then at 
the beginning of 1947, he went 
back to Adelaide to spend the re- 
mainder of his short life in teach- 
ing Sacred Scripture, Greek and 
Hebrew. 

Until now Father Peter had nev- 
er experienced ill health. He was 
as hard as nails and as strong as 
a lion. It was during his short 
stay at Goulbourn that an ugly 
mole was removed from his left 
temple. This, if only it had been 
known then, was actually the worst 
form of cancer. Already he was 
suffering from this dread disease. 



And, unbeknown to himself, he had 
begun to fight his big battle . . . 
the battle to keep going in spite 
of failing physical health. This 
was to be the martyrdom for which 
he had prayed and longed. 

"Internal suffering, Mary," he 
wrote, "is your suffering, and it 
must be very pleasing to God be- 
cause no one but God and she to 
whom it shall please Him to reveal 
it, know to what extent anyone is 
suffering internally. Yes, savants 
can say you have nothing to worry 
about, you have no heart-aches; 
rot, man, and all the rest of it. 
They seem to forget that God can 
allow internal suffering, an internal 
suffering without showing a trace 
of it outside. The event doesn't 
make the hero; it only manifests 
him to the world. So, external suf- 
fering doesn't beget the patience; 
it only shows the patience already 
stored up to the world. Take any 
of the saints, I've been reading 
about. Saints Therese, Bernadette 
. . . they cut their teeth on internal 
suffering and then God was pleased 
to manifest their heroism after- 
wards with T.B." 

He wanted to be like a rubber 
ball ; so that when "knocked down 
by suffering or humiliation, he 
could bounce up again for more." 
"But," he wrote, "make me realise 
that I am getting it. You know, 
not those prigs you can't insult, 
who haven't enough brains or who 
have too much pride to take an 
insult." 



160 



They were the little crosses that 
came day by day to add to his 
battle. "Tomorrow," he wrote, is 
a fast of the Rule, and, cold weath- 
er or not, I want to eat and drink 
as little as I can. You must help 
me, Mary, for besides my own 
weakness, I have external influence 
to counteract. A man can't be sin- 
gular. You've got to give me the 
opportunity and make me seize it. 
You know how I feel: I'd welcome 
the excuse to have a feed, but 'Thy 
kingdom is not of this world.' Jesus 
spoke these words to heedless ears 
when he spoke them to Pilate, but 
the Holy Ghost wished to preserve 
them for me to meditate upon to- 
night. Don't let me be heedless. 
Make me correspond. 'My kingdom 
is not of this world.' Mary, when 
I start off thinking of mortifica- 
tion, straightway my mind runs to 
bodily austerity and the table. But 
these are the glamorous mortifica- 
tions. Training the imagination to 
keep on prayer and the psalms ; 
mortification of the tongue. If St. 
James was ever inspired, it was 
when he called the tongue 'an un- 
ruly member.' I have to take my- 
self by the ears. I have to tell 
myself . . . watch the tongue." 

"What suffering Jesus must have 
gone through nailed to the cross. 
Crucified! It was the minimum he 
could move. Cramp must have been 
racking his whole body. Oh, Mary, 
I want to stand perfectly still at 
the Office. The minimum of move- 
ment. I will try the same at medi- 



tation." And so he did. It was 
quite noticeable that he remained 
in the one position during prayer 
and the chanting of the Divine 
Office. 

During 1947, Father Peter un- 
derwent an operation at the Cal- 
vary Hospital for what appeared 
to be an ordinary tumor in the 
neck. It was not successful. A 
few months later, the doctors de- 
cided to operate once again. This 
time the true nature of the disease 
was revealed. Pathological exam- 
ination showed the presence of the 
black cells of Melonotic sarcoma — 
the worst form of cancer. He was 
told that he had only a few months 
to live, at the most two years, and 
that he would probably have to 
endure intense agony, especially if 
the disease should spread to the 
spine. He received the news with 
intense joy. It was what he had 
prayed and longed for. At last, 
God had granted his request. He 
was not content to be resigned to 
God's will. He embraced it, loved 
it, accepted it with both hands 
and thanked the Eternal Father 
through His heavenly Mother for 
such a great grace. He felt un- 
worthy of it all. 

"Mary," he wrote, "you know 
I'm yours. You know I wanted to 
offer myself to you to suffer. You 
know how the Provincial knocked 
on the head that idea and what 
he suggested. It has just come 
back to me . . . fidelity to duty, a 
new martyrdom. The job at hand 



161 



is the job God wants to sanctify 
me by." 

So, he would not sit down to 
wait for death. He was up and 
doing. No feeling of tiredness or 
depression could keep him from 
the regular observance or from his 
duty of teaching. He would die in 
the harness. "Gee, I can't come at 
this half-measure," he wrote when 
he had been advised to go easily. 
"You know, not working too hard, 
but I guess I've got to try, because 
it's God's will. 'Thy will be done.' " 
His cheerfulness never wavered 
during this time. He was always 
thoughtful of others, always trying 
to help. He would never ask for 
a dispensation, never relax his con- 
stancy in the confessional, never 
complain that he was too tired to 
preach. His only complaint was 
that he had so little time to do all 
he wanted to do for God and the 
students he was teaching. 

After mature consideration and 
advice, Father Provincial decided, 
at the end of 1947, to take Father 
Peter to Sydney for further treat- 
ment in a last effort to preserve 
him for the Province of the Holy 
Ghost, so greatly was he valued 
and so necessary was the work he 
was doing. This treatment was a 
failure, but it served to increase 
Father Peter's martyrdom. Inter- 
nally and externally, he suffered 
agony. The sympathy and kindness 
that were offered to him only made 
him crave to be back at work. The 



uncertainty of the cure was so 
upsetting. At one time he would 
be told that he would be right in 
a few weeks . . . then his hopes 
would be dashed to the ground. 
The treatment went on and on, 
month after month. " 'My God, my 
God, why hast thou forsaken me?' 
Mary, Mother, that's what I've 
been suffering the last while and 
I didn't know it. Now I see, but 
I feel it is too late. But I'll be on 
my guard the next time. I know 
the method of attack and with 
your help we'll fix it; offer it up; 
try and trust in God's mercy." 

He returned to Adelaide appar- 
ently much improved, but he had 
no illusions about his condition. "I 
know," he wrote, "that Our Lord 
must have felt much the same when 
He had all that mucking about 
before Pilate. The pride of the 
Jews and the back-chat of Pilate 
... 'If he were not a malefactor, 
etc' 'Sayest thou this thing of 
thyself?' 'I find no cause in him.' 
Then sent off to Herod. Back a- 
gain to Pilate for Barabbas and 
the scourging. I see that feeling 
so well, is my little trial before 
Pilate." 

The Adelaide doctors decided to 
try the X-ray treatment as a last 
resort. It too, failed, but not be- 
fore Father Peter's neck had been 
reduced to a gaping mass of raw 
flesh. It caused him intense pain. 
It was agony to move. Many a 
night he tossed and turned, unable 



162 



to lay his head on the pillow. But 
next morning he was a work again. 
Up at five a.m. for Mass, and 
very, very seldom did he miss his 
Scripture class. He was feeling it 
harder and harder to keep going, 
but he prayed that if he could do 
nothing else with his students, at 
least he might teach them to love 
God more. When, finally, he went 
to the doctor for a last examina- 
tion, he wrote : "You know, Mother, 
how delighted I'd be for them to 
find half my chest eaten away, or 
at least a spot there. I want to 
get at it. It is typical of my im- 
petuosity." "I feel as though I 
won't die yet because I have not 
suffered enough. How about start- 
ing in on me and letting me die 
soon." 

The last entry in his diary reads : 
"August 24th. Dear Mary, teach 
me your sorrows. Teach me sac- 
rifice. Make me jump right out 
and into it tomorrow." 

No one knew what Father Peter 
suffered. His pain was mostly in- 
ternal. During the last few months 
of his life, he suffered intense in- 
ternal pain and conflict. Satan 
could not let him go without a 
fight. Depression, the desire to 
end it all, despair, the foulest as- 



saults of hell ... all combined to 
try to conquer him, but in vain. 
Mary protected her own and he 
came through the trial. Added to 
all this, a toxic condition of the 
blood set in, causing an irritating 
rash to appear over his whole body. 
It caused him sleepless nights and 
painful days, but never did he 
complain, and as often as possible 
he tried to avoid treatment so as 
to suffer more. 

Pure, naked suffering, without 
an ounce of earthly consolation. 
"Little Flower," he wrote, "I ap- 
preciate in my own little way your 
sufferings. I'm sure all your ac- 
quaintances said to you : 'You nev- 
er have anything to worry you,' 
because they didn't understand the 
pain self-consciousness and sensi- 
tiveness bring. Do you remember 
how I used to cry and cry and cry 
. . . The humiliations and just plain 
misery of it ... I appreciate your 
mortification of helping others and 
saying a kind word etc. . . . Little 
Therese, I like your comparison to 
a ball. It's more practical because 
there's that deep suffering behind 
it, and behind suffering there is 
that 'peace' He has left us, not as 
the world knows peace, but His 
peace. 



Against self-pity, Man of Sorrows, defend me 
With Thy deep sweetness and Thy gentle power. 
And out of all the hurt and pain and heart-break 
Help me to harvest a new sympathy 
For suffering mankind, a wiser pity 
For those who lift a heavier cross." 



163 



About a fortnight before his 
death, a small lump appeared on 
his right side below the ribs. He 
discovered it and rejoiced. "This 
is going to do the job," he said. 
It was a sign to him that the 
cancer was going to spread. What 
he had longed for could not now 
be far off. 

On Thursday, August 26th, he 
was forced to complain of a se- 
vere, sickening pain in the abdo- 
men. Father Peter was taken im- 
mediately to the hospital. When 
examined the next day, it was clear 
that an operation should not be 
performed except as a last resort. 
With treatment, he began to im- 
prove and the doctors promised 
that he would be able to return 
home in a few days. But God in- 
tervened. Father Peter caught a 
slight chill which kept him in bed 
for a few more days. For these 
days he was not allowed to say 
Mass. On Wednesday evening he 
insisted on saying it the next day. 
Thus it was that, all unknowingly, 
he offered the Holy Sacrifice on the 
very day of his death and received 
his Viaticum. 

That afternoon, 2nd of Septem- 
ber, His Grace the Archbishop and 
Very Rev. Father Bede, C.P., paid 
him a visit. Both reported that 
they had never seen Father Peter 
looking so well. He was bright 
and cheerful and joked with Fa- 
ther Bede and told him that he 
would be home on Saturday. Dur- 



ing the day he had recited the 
Divine Office as far as Vespers. 
Compline was to have been said 
after tea. 

Shortly after five p.m., the pa- 
tient complained of a severe pain 
in the head and the nursing sister 
went away to obtain relief for his 
distress. On her return, she found 
him semi-conscious, with his right 
side completely paralysed. The 
secondary deposits of the dread 
cancer had attacked the brain and 
caused a cerebral hemorrhage. Un- 
consciousness came quickly and re- 
mained until the end. A message 
was sent post-haste to the monas- 
tery and Very Rev. Father Rector, 
together with Father Augustine 
went immediately to their dying 
confrere. Father Augustine ad- 
ministered the Last Sacraments 
and the two priests and the Blue 
Nuns said the prayers for the dy- 
ing, whilst the community at home 
had gathered in the choir to pray 
for the departing soul. The Rosary 
of Mary was recited continuously 
at Father Peter's bedside. He died 
peacefully. There were three or 
four spasms as the hemorrhage did 
its deadly work and then Father 
Peter's breathing became regular 
and his pulse normal. It seemed 
that he would be spared a little 
longer. But shortly after 10 o'clock 
a change came over him. His pulse 
began to fail gradually. Almost 
imperceptibly his breathing ceased 
and at 10:20 p.m., with the sign 



164 



of the Passion on his heart and 
the crucifix pressed to his lips, with 
the rosary of Mary and the blessed 
candle in his unparalysed left 
hand, as the words of absolution 
were whispered over him, he ren- 
dered up his soul to God. "Gee, to 
think I might get out of it in a 
few months, and to think that so 
many people are praying for a 
cure. They don't know what they 
ask. I look upon this sickness as 
a great thing . . . and to die so 
young . . . my worry is that I am 
not worthy of the grace." 

To find Him whom his soul 
sought and longed for and loved, 
was to him the greatest grace of 
all. And now he found Him . . . 
Thursday night ... the eve of the 
First Friday, when the Sacred 
Heart had asked that His faithful 
ones keep Him company in the Gar- 
den of Gethsemane. It was Father 
Peter's last Holy Hour. God's will 
had been done and, as the Arch- 
bishop said, "The Mother of God 
had turned to her Divine Son and 
said, 'It is enough.' " 

The body was clothed in the 
black habit of the Passion and the 
purple stole placed about the neck. 
It lay at the Calvary Hospital until 
two p.m. the next day when the 
ritual having been said, it was 
carried to the Monastery Church. 
There the mortal remains of Fa- 
ther Peter were received by Father 
Rector and the entire Community. 
To the chant of the Miserere and 



the Subvenite, the coffin was 
placed before the High Altar. The 
religious kept constant watch as 
the faithful came to pay their last 
respects to one whom they had 
known and loved in life. 

At six-thirty p.m. the community 
chanted Matins and Lauds for the 
Dead at which Father Provincial 
presided. Next morning, His Grace 
the Archbishop and numerous di- 
ocesan clergy and all our own 
priests offered Mass for the repose 
of Father Peter's soul. 

At ten a.m., the Archbishop pre- 
sided at the Solemn Obsequies. 
Father Kevin, C.P., was the cele- 
brant of the Mass, assisted by Fa- 
thers Gabriel and James, C.P., as 
Deacon and Sub-Deacon respective- 
ly. Very Reverend Fathers Pro- 
vincial and Rector were the Dea- 
cons at the Throne, the students 
of the Province formed the choir, 
thirty-four members of the dioces- 
an clergy, including the Venerable 
Vicar General, filled the front 
benches of the church. Behind them 
were members of the Christian and 
Marist Brothers, the Sisters of 
Mercy, the Little Company of Mary 
and the Sisters of St. Joseph. The 
laity filled the rest of the church 
to capacity. 

When the Holy Sacrifice had 
been offered, His Grace, vested in 
Cappa Magna, and standing at the 
head of the coffin, delivered a most 
moving and impressive panegyric. 
His words brought tears to many 



165 



eyes, tears rather of joy than of 
sorrow. "Subject to the decrees of 
Holy Mother Church," His Grace 
said, "Father Peter was a man of 
extraordinary purity of soul and 
heroic virtue. . . . Humanly speak- 
ing, the Congregation of the Pas- 
sion has sustained a great loss in 
the death of this young priest, for 
he was a brilliant student and his 
superiors had plans for his future 
career. But, viewed with the eyes 
of faith, the Passionists have 
gained an intercessor in heaven. 
There is a similarity between Fa- 
ther Peter and St. Gabriel of the 
Mother of Sorrows. Not only is 
there a likeness in the fact that 
both died young — St. Gabriel was 
twenty-four, Father Peter twenty- 
eight, but a greater likeness in 
their intense devotion to the Moth- 
er of God. I remember his first 
sermon in the Cathedral. Needless 
to say it was on the Mother of 
God. I thought at the time that 
though some priests might depend 
entirely on the prayers of others 
for the success of their preaching, 
the life of this young man had its 
own efficiency, so deep was his sin- 
cerity. He had prayed for suffering 
from the time he entered the Con- 
gregation, perhaps even before, 
and his prayer was heard. After 
much suffering over the last twelve 
months, he died almost a painless 
death. It seemed as though the 
Mother of Sorrows had turned to 
her Divine Son and said, 'It is 



enough', and his soul passed peace- 
fully away." His Grace concluded 
with a word on Father Peter's zeal 
for vocations. "Let us pray," he 
said, "that from heaven he will ob- 
tain many vocations, not only for 
his own esteemed congregation, but 
also for the Archdiocese, and re- 
ligious vocations for the Brothers 
and Sisters of the teaching orders." 
The Archbishop then gave the 
final absolutions, and as the glori- 
ous and triumphant notes of the 
In Paradisum rang through the 
crowded church, the funeral pro- 
cession wended its way to the little 
cemetery in the Monasterygrounds. 

There the Nuns and Brothers 
formed a guard of honor on either 
side of the drive and the body of 
Father Peter passed through their 
midst to its last resting place in 
the shadow of the monastery where 
he had spent the greater part of 
his religious life. His Grace read 
the burial service, and as the cler- 
gy chanted the "Benedictus," the 
body was lowered into the grave. 
As the last corporal work of mercy 
was performed for the dead priest, 
the students recited the Rosary 
which he had loved so much in life. 

The body lies beneath its cover- 
ing of clay. At the head of the 
grave is a small, plain headstone 
surmounted by a cross. On the 
stone one reads "Jesu Christi Pas- 
sio. Father Peter Dodd, C.P., 2nd 
September, 1948. May he rest in 
peace." That body awaits the res- 



166 



urrection of the dead when, as 
Father Peter wrote, not long be- 
fore he died, "My glorified body 
... a monument to God's mercy and 
to the wonders of God. To think 
that this body could be free from 
the cravings of the flesh; this in- 
tellect free and unshackled by pride 
or selfishness ; this will, willing God 
and despising or rather not even 
considering the things of the 
body." 

Thus we conclude the earthly 



life of Father Peter. "Is it worth- 
while studying and studying Mari- 
ology with a view to writing and 
preaching, blazing Mary's name 
over Australia?" he had written in 
1945. "The answer is yes if — if 
that's the means you want me to 
take, Mary. How do I know the 
way? Wait, Peter, it might be 
suffering." This was the way. May 
his example help to bring every 
Australian to a filial love of Mary, 
and, through her, to go to Jesus. 



Obituary Notices 1941 



IX. 
Father Nazarius of St. Martin 

Father Nazarius of St. Martin (Martino Castresana), of the Province of the Most Precious 
Blood, died in Bolivia, on April 9th, in the 36th year of his age and the 20th of his 
religious profession. 

(Since the necrology of Fr. Nazarius has not been received, we publish this brief notice, 
taken from the magazine, "El Pasionario," of May, 1941.) 



GATHER NAZARIUS of St. Mar- 
tin was born at Villanane (Ala- 
va) on May 10, 1905. His parents 
were Gabriel Castresana and Mi- 
chela Valle, from whom he received 
the name Martin. 

His vocation to the Passionist 
way of life had its origin in his 
relations with our brethren at the 
sanctuary of Our Lady of Angosto, 
where he pronounced his holy vows 
on December 5, 1921. 

He completed his classical stud- 
ies at Tafalla (Navarre), those of 



philosophy and theology at Mieres 
(Asturia), where he was ordained 
a priest on December 22, 1928. 

Recognizing in him a religious 
of solid virtue and ardent zeal for 
the salvation of souls, his Superiors 
assigned him to the Republic of 
Bolivia, as his field of the ministry, 
and there he gloriously crowned 
his missionary career after eight 
years. 

Father Nazarius is the third vic- 
tim which the Congregation has 
had in this remote Mission in but 
a few years. 



167 



X. 

Brother Augustine of St. Joseph 

Brother Augustine of St. Joseph (Thomas Mulcrone) of the Province of the Holy Cross died 

in Detroit Mich., April 9, 1941 in the 66th year of his life and the 26th of his Profession. 



COMETIMES God asks a Pas- 
^ sionist to live up to the name 
even in details or incidentals. And 
so, during the official commemora- 
tion of our Lord's Sufferings and 
Death of the current year, the call 
came for another soul to enter into 
agony with Christ and so be 
brought to glory. On Wednesday of 
Holy Week, April 9th, 1941, at 
5:45 P.M., a telephone message 
from Mt. Carmel Hospital brought 
the news that Brother Augustine 
of St. Joseph was dying. The Fa- 
ther Rector made a hurried dash 
to the Brother's bedside, but was 
not in time. The end had come 
quickly and peacefully — a man who 
had been no trouble in life gave 
no trouble in death. His passing 
to eternity was as quiet as were 
the 26 years he had spent in the 
religious life. 

The fatal attack had come on 
that same morning. Brother Au- 
gustine complained of severe pains 
in the region of the heart, and was 
immediately put to bed by the in- 
firmarian. The house physician be- 
ing summoned, he diagnosed the 
case as angina pectoris, and ad- 
vised administration of the Last 
Sacraments. This was done by Fa- 
ther Rector during the dinner hour, 
with the community assisting, and 
the patient himself responding to 



the prayers. Then he was removed 
to the hospital. According to later 
accounts, Brother Augustine 
seemed to improve during the af- 
ternoon, and even took some nour- 
ishment. It was while the heart 
specialist was conducting another 
examination that Brother Augus- 
tine softly remarked that the pain 
was less severe, and then almost 
at once passed to the presence of 
his God. Due to the solemnities 
of Holy Week, the body was held 
till Easter Monday for burial. A 
sympathetic representation of re- 
ligious and clergy assisted the com- 
munity and relatives in paying fi- 
nal tribute to the deceased, and 
then the remains were transferred 
to the cemetery at Louisville. 

Brother Augustine of St. Joseph, 
formerly Thomas Mulcrone, was 
born June 24, 1875, in Newport, 
County Mayo, Ireland — and no one 
could ever forget the fact. Even- 
tually he came to America, as so 
many of his fellow countrymen have 
done. And while the railroads, the 
police or fire departments of the 
United States may have lost a typi- 
cal and valuable member, their loss 
was religious gain. In his late thir- 
ties, Thomas Mulcrone heard the 
call: "Follow Me!", and enrolled 
himself among the followers of 
Christ Crucified, making his pro- 



168 



fession on May 2, 1915. 

With regard to his 26 years of 
religious life, there is little to tell 
about one who learned the "Ama 
nesciri" so well, and practised it so 
faithfully. Humility and childlike- 
ness were outstanding virtues in 
Brother Augustine's life. He gave 
evidence of it during his novitiate, 
when, inquiring concerning all the 
young men about him and being 
told they were destined for the 
priesthood, he remarked: "The 
likes of me with the likes of them!" 

As a result of his retiring dis- 
position, few outsiders came to 
know Brother Augustine, and at 
the funeral services many ques- 
tions had to be answered as to 
his identity and his work. Yet the 
worth of the man was apparent to 
the discerning eye. A distinguished 
clerical visitor once remarked : 
"You have a saint in that brother!" 

It was probably this desire for 
the hidden life that led Brother 
Augustine to test his vocation to 
the Trappists. But God had other 
plans, and the humble Brother came 
back to his first love. The return 
occasioned much good-natured chaf- 
fing from the brethren : such as, 
that Brother Augustine suddenly 
discovered that he had only a few 
more days in which to use his re- 
duced-fare clergy certificate for the 
current year, and acted according- 
ly. All these things were taken 
with his customary good humor, 
and Brother Augustine thought 



that had he been younger he might 
have stood the test in the stricter 
community. 

For many years he was refec- 
torian, and the cleanliness and or- 
der of his office have become a 
proverb. Superiors have said that 
they could ring the table-bell with- 
out looking, so surely was it to 
be in the same place, always. 
Towards the end of his life he 
was given lighter duties, and will 
be remembered affectionately by 
the Detroit community as "The 
Man with the Broom." 

He was not beyond distractions 
in prayer, and on one occasion rose 
hastily from his seat in the choir — 
'leaped' would be too strong a word 
for Brother Augustine's move- 
ments — and with a muttered: "I 
forgot the mugs," he was off to 
the refectory. 

The spirit of poverty was his, 
too. On the day he died, he brought 
a small sum to the Vicar, in the 
washroom, with the request: "Bet- 
ter take it now ; if I died and they 
found this in my room — oh! — oh!" 
— the words being accompanied by 
Brother Augustine's characteristic 
shake of the head. 

The celebration of the silver ju- 
bilee of his religious profession 
brought no small measure of hap- 
piness to the faithful brother. The 
community and the province did 
their share to make the occasion a 
joyous one; and the jubilarian had 
the additional pleasure of the pres- 



169 



ence of his brother and sister, the 
only immediate relatives in this 
country. 

Such, in brief, was the life of 
one who was hidden with Christ 
in God, seeking always the things 



that are above, a true Passionist. 
We loved him in life, let us not 
forget him in death. He gave all 
of us good example; may he con- 
tinue to help us by his prayers in 
Heaven. 



XI. 
Father Ambrose of Our Lady of Perpetual Help 

Father Ambrose of Our Lady of Perpetual Help (Joseph Vincent Hayes) of the Province of 
St. Patrick, died in the hospital at Belfast, Ireland, on April 21, 1941, in his 63rd year of 
life and the 42nd year of his religious profession. 



CATHER AMBROSE of Our Lady 
1 of Perpetual Help, died on April 
21, after a brief illness in a hos- 
pital at Belfast. 

Born at Beragh, County Tyrone, 
on April 24, 1878, the son of Ed- 
ward and Anna Joanna Henry, Jo- 
seph Vincent Hayes, for so was 
he known in the world, asked and 
obtained admittance to the Passion- 
ists at the age of 19. He made his 
religous profession at Broadway on 
June 7, 1899, and completed his 
ecclesiastical studies at Mt. Argus 
after which he was ordained to the 
priesthood in the College of the 
Holy Cross Clonliffe (Dublin) on 
Sept. 22, 1906. 

During the 35 years of his priest- 
ly life, he was mostly occupied in 
giving Missions and Retreats, and 
his kindliness and prudence ob- 
tained for him good results where 
others had labored in vain. In the 



last years, he also found a good field 
for the apostolate in parochial work 
at Ardoyne, where he showed him- 
self a special friend of the poor 
and the afflicted. 

A zealous and indefatigable 
worker, he fled all publicity and 
sought obscurity. He was facile 
with pen and published various 
writings on devotional subjects in 
The Cross and The Irish News. 
Animated by a sincere fraternal 
charity, he placed his experience 
and wise counsel at the disposal 
of all his brethren. 

Father Ambrose was in good 
health almost to the end. Struck 
down with an illness which was 
quickly recognized as fatal, he re- 
ceived the last sacraments, and 
calmly awaited the call of the Mas- 
ter whom he had served with such 
faithfulness. May his soul enjoy 
eternal peace. 



O 



170 




GENERAL CURIA 



Announcing the Preparatory Meet- 
ing concerning the miracles attributed 
to Blessed Vincent Mary Strambi, 
Bishop and member of our Congrega- 
tion. 

On February 1st, 1949 there will be 
held in the Vatican Palace the Pre- 
paratory Meeting of the Sacred Con- 
gregation of Rites concerning the 
miracles attributed to Blessed Vincent 
Mary Strambi, Bishop and member of 
our Congregation, in view of his 
canonization. We order, therefore, as 
is customary, that the Divine Sacra- 
ment of the Eucharist be solemnly 
exposed for the adoration of the faith- 
ful from nine o'clock to noon on the 
above-mentioned day and that the 
usual prayers be offered for the suc- 
cessful issue of the Preparatory Meet- 
ing. 

Rome, from the Retreat of Sts. John 
and Paul, January 3rd, 1949. 

Malcolm of Mary, C.P., 
Vice-General Superior 



From a private but highly reliable 
source we learn that the Meeting ap- 
proved the Miracles of Blessed Vin- 
cent Mary and that on Sunday, Feb- 
ruary 6th, the Holy Father ratified 
the decision. This makes it all but 
certain that all the obstacles for the 
canonization of Blessed Vincent are 
removed. The expectations are that 
the canonization will take place dur- 
ing the coming Holy Year. 



STS. JOHN AND PAUL 

Life in Rome is about as usual. A 
very mild Roman winter, plus the 
central heating in the new wing, has 
helped to make things more pleasant. 
Christmas at Sts. John and Paul's 
followed the usual pattern. During 
the Novena, the Magnificat was sung 
each evening, by order of the Cardinal 
Vicar. It was a very fitting prepara- 
tion for the great feast. This year, 
because of Father General's absence 
in South America, Fr. Malcolm was 
celebrant at the Midnight Mass. 



171 



On January 3, work was begun on 
restoring the original facade of the 
Basilica. This will mean the destroy- 
ing of the Choir, the one that was 
used by Our Holy Founder, as well 
as the room in which he received vi- 
sions of Our Lady, during the last 
months of his life. 

Our Fathers who were in Rome in 
the thirties will remember Father 
Seraphim, rector at Sts. John and 
Paul's from 1934-1937. On December 
28, Father celebrated the golden jubi- 
lee of his ordination. The exact date 
was December 17, but because of the 
Novena the celebration was postponed 
until after Christmas. Father sang a 
Solemn Mass at the tomb of Our Holy 
Founder, at the very same altar on 
which he had celebrated his first Holy 
Mass, fifty years before. Afterwards 
the entire community took part in the 
extraordinary "gaudeamus" in honor 
of the Jubilarian. Father Seraphim 
has had a rather busy priestly life — 
having been Rector at Rome, at St. 
Angelo, Perugia, Recanati, Moricone. 
He was also Provincial Consultor for 
two terms in the Pieta Province. 
During his long term as lector (for 
fifteen years he taught philosophy and 
theology), Father had the privilege of 
teaching and directing, from 1904- 
1905, the Servant of God, Father John 
of the Holy Spirit, whose cause for 
beatification has been introduced at 
Rome. When not occupied in the many 
duties of his various offices, Father 
found time to give Missions and Re- 
treats. Now he lives a retired life in 
the quiet of the Motherhouse, still act- 
ing as spiritual guide to many of the 
community, a source of edification to 
all. The Passionist and the Province 



of Holy Cross unite with our 
Brethren throughout the world in 
wishing Father Seraphim a sincere: 
Ad multos annos ! 

We are glad to report that Fr. 
Roger, now studying Scripture in 
Rome, has been very fortunate in his 
courses, so that if all continues as in 
the past months he will be able to 
finish his work in June and then re- 
turn to the States. 

PROVINCE OF ST. PAUL 
OF THE CROSS 

(East U.S.A.) 

As was only proper the safe return 
home on Dec. 13th, 1948, of our Very 
Rev. Fr. Provincial Gabriel to Union 
City, N. J., was the occasion of 
genuine rejoicing on the part of the 
local community and of all the su- 
periors who were assembled to greet 
his Paternity and offer him welcome 
and felicitations after so long and 
hazardous a journey. 

His Paternity arrived home by air- 
plane and landed at La Guardia Field, 
N. Y. It will be remembered that in 
going to the Orient for the canonical 
visitation, Fr. Provincial traveled the 
entire distance by airplane, starting 
at La Guardia Field and going over- 
land to California and then across the 
Pacific to Shanghai, with stops at 
Hawaii, Wake Island and Tokyo. On 
the return trip he took off from Hong- 
kong and landed at Calcutta and flew 
thence to Delhi, where he had a 
pleasant visit with Archbishop Kier- 
kels. From Delhi he continued his 
journey to Shannon Airport in Ire- 
land with stops at Istanbul, Damas- 
cus, Brussels and London. In Dublin 



172 



he was met by Fr. Stephen Lafferty, 
Rector of our Retreat in Collooney, 
Co. Sligo, Ireland. He spent a week 
in Ireland as Fr. Stephen's guest. As 
is well known Fr. Stephen once spent 
eight years in our province and 
learned to love the U.S.A. and won 
many friends among our brethren as 
well as among the clergy and people 
by his genial and fine priestly and re- 
ligious character. On Dec. 11th Fr. 
Provincial and Fr. Stephen proceeded 
to Limerick and on the following day 
went to Shannon Airport. Fr. Pro- 
vincial boarded the plane on the even- 
ing of Dec. 12th and landed in New 
York on Dec. 13th at 9:30 A.M. 

In New York Fr. Provincial was 
met at the plane by a large gathering 
of our superiors besides a group of 
journalists and press photographers. 
His Paternity bowed to the necessity 
of giving an interview. In the metro- 
politan press considerable prominence 
was given to his arrival as well as to 
the views he expressed on the current 
situation in China and on its inter- 
national implications. The following 
article taken from The New York 
Times is typical of, if not identical 
with, many notices that appeared in 
both Catholic and secular newspapers. 
"The war in China can be the be- 
ginning of World War III," the Very 
Rev. Gabriel Gorman, Provincial of 
the Passionist Fathers, warned yester- 
day on his arrival at La Guardia Field 
from a three-months tour through 
China. He appealed to the American 
people to urge President Truman "to 
give immediate encouragement to the 
Chinese people in their life and death 
struggle against the armed Com- 
munist invaders, as we did against the 



Japanese invaders." Declaring that 
it was not too late to help China, Fa- 
ther Gorman said that he felt that 
"the American Ambassador and con- 
suls in China took too hasty action in 
ordering and recommending the com- 
plete evacuation of Americans from 
all China." He added that Americans 
were comparatively safe in the 
northern regions. Fr. Gorman de- 
clared that he was not 100 per cent 
for the Nationalist Government be- 
cause it lacked complete democracy 
"in our sense of the word." However, 
he added the government was in a 
transitional period. There was no 
pro-Communist feeling among the 
Chinese, he said, although some felt 
that "any change would be a change 
for the better." (The New York 
Times, Dec. 14th, 1948) 

In the last issue of the Bulletin we 
noted the return home of eight of our 
young recruits to the missions in 
China, who had been training at our 
language school in Peiping. Besides 
these eight there are also five others 
who are back home on temporary 
leave. Two of these five came home 
because of ill health. They will re- 
main here until their health is proper- 
ly restored and they are pronounced 
fit to return to their mission in the 
Orient. These are Frs. Linus McShef- 
fry and Aloysius O'Malley. The 
former arrived home on Jan. 3rd and 
the latter on Jan. 6th. Also arrived 
in Union City on Jan. 6th are Frs. 
Leo Berard and Wendelin Moore. 
These two Fathers are home for the 
customary furlough and rest. On 
Jan. 26th Fr. Ernest Cunningham ar- 
rived in Union City from the west 
coast, where he had been visiting rela- 



173 



tives since his arrival in the States 
two weeks ago. 



On Wed. Jan. 12th Fr. Fabian 
Flynn arrived back home from 
Europe. He returned to the States 
in order to obtain further instructions 
for his work in Europe. As is well 
known Fr. Fabian is working for the 
Bishops' Committee for War Relief 
under the auspices of the N. C. W. C. 
Since his return he has been attend- 
ing conferences and giving lectures, 
while awaiting to return to Europe 
with a new assignment. He fully ex- 
pects to be appointed to work among 
Europe's large army of war sufferers 
called "displaced persons." 



Esteemed visitors from the West 
who recently stayed with us for a 
week or ten days were the Very Rev. 
Fr. Herman, former provincial of 
Holy Cross Province and now Rector 
of our Chicago house, and Rev. Fr. 
Gordian, former provincial secretary 
and now Vice-Rector in Louisville, 
Ky. They were met at the train by 
Fr. Brendan, our Provincial Econome. 
Fr. Provincial and his Secretary had 
been at the station earlier but had to 
return home when they learned that 
the train would arrive two hours be- 
hind scheduled time. 

With Fr. Provincial and his Secre- 
tary, the western visitors visited our 
houses in Riverdale, Jamaica, our new 
foundation in Farmington near Hart- 
ford, Conn., and our monasteries in 
West Springfield and Boston. Later 
the two visitors entrained for Dun- 
kirk, N. Y., where they were enter- 
tained at our Retreat of St. Mary's 
and at Holy Cross Seminary. As Fr. 



Herman is celebrating his silver 
jubilee of ordination, a dinner was 
given in his honor at Jamaica, West 
Springfield and in Brighton. The two 
Fathers left the province with the 
hearty good wishes of all the brethren 
and with the special prayers and good 
wishes for Fr. Herman that he may be 
blessed with many more years of 
fruitful work in the vineyard of 
Christ through the ministry of the 
Holy Priesthood. 



Fr. David Haverfush, formerly a 
member of our province and now a 
permanent member of the Immaculate 
Conception Province in Argentina, 
visited our superiors and brethren in 
Union City, N.J., on Jan. 25th this 
year. Fr. David was officially aggre- 
gated to the Province of the Immacu- 
late Conception during the recent 
canonical visitation of the M. Rev. Fr. 
General in Argentina. During the 
years of his stay in Argentina Fr. 
David has held the post of lector of 
students, has done duty as chaplain 
of English-speaking seamen in Buenos 
Aires and at present is doing paro- 
chial work as curate in one of our 
monastery parishes. 



On Thursday Jan. 27th the Most 
Rev. Fr. General Albert called our 
Very Rev. Fr. Provincial Gabriel on 
the telephone from our Monastery in 
Sierra Madre, Cal. The purpose of 
this call was to say a final word of 
greeting and farewell to Fr. Pro- 
vincial and to all the brethren of our 
province. Fr. General had completed 
the work of the canonical visitation in 
the S. American houses and came 
north to California to obtain trans- 



174 



portation for Australia. In Aus- 
tralia, Fr. General will make the visi- 
tation of the houses of the Congrega- 
tion before returning to Rome. We 
express the hope that his Paternity 
will have a safe journey and will re- 
main in good health during his work 
in Australia and will take back to 
Rome many pleasant memories of his 
work among the sons of St. Paul of 
the Cross in the Western Hemisphere. 



The time of the annual retreats has 
rolled around again and at this writ- 
ing many of them are already half 
over. This year we have made the 
usual mutual exchanges of mission- 
aries for these retreats. Our Pro- 
vince has sent west two reliable men 
in Very Rev. Fr. Consultor Berch- 
mans and Very Rev. Fr. Felix, su- 
perior in Toronto, Canada. The 
former is preaching the retreat for 
our western brethren at the novitiate 
house in St. Paui, Kansas and in 
Des Moines and the latter is handling 
the retreat in Louisville and in Chi- 
cago. On their side the West has sent 
us two able men in Frs. Thomas Car- 
ter and Anthony Maher. The former 
will preach the retreat in Union City, 
N.J. and in West Springfield and the 
latter in Pittsburgh and in Baltimore. 



"Saint Gabriel's Retreat House — 
The Old and The New" is how Father 
Lucian heads his Christmas Greetings 
to the Retreatants. The leaflet has a 
picture of the present Retreat House 
and also sketches of the contemplated 
one, interior and exterior. With 
January a drive was begun to raise 
the $175,000 necessary to cover the 
estimated $300,000 total expense of 



the new wing. The new wing is to 
provide 52 additional rooms, making 
a total of 100, with other conveniences 
in proportion; also a new dining room, 
recreation room, a private Eucharistic 
Chapel; the monastery choir will be 
enlarged and used for the public Re- 
treat Devotions and Exercises. Both 
Architect and the Boss Contractor are 
regular Retreatants at St. Gabriel's 
while other Retreatants are invited to 
put in bids along their respective 
lines. 



Father Andrew Ansbro, C.P., is to 
be congratulated on the success and 
the fine work he is doing with the 
C.C.C. (Catholic Center Club) which 
he established in Jamaica some four 
or five years ago. The club has two 
divisions: one for boys between 12-15, 
the other from 16 to 25. The purpose 
is to help them through their critical 
years. To cultivate and guide voca- 
tional interests the Club sponsors ad- 
dresses by outstanding members of the 
Clergy, of Religious Orders, of the 
Laity. Its activities embrace excur- 
sions to Houses of Study, spontaneous 
Club quizzes, discussions on the vari- 
ous issues of the day, an annual Rally 
and a Communion Breakfast, motion- 
picture scenes of missionary activity 
and Lay apostolic work, library privi- 
leges, club published Bulletin, per- 
sonal "hav-a-chat" sessions with the 
Reverend Moderator and an ever-valu- 
able association with clean-cut young 
men. Although young in years the 
C.C.C. has already rendered invalu- 
able service to hundreds of young 
men. It has the approval of high ec- 
clesiastical authorities as is evidenced 
by the fact that Bishops do not hesi- 



175 



tate to be guest-speakers of the Club. 
The PASSIONIST wishes Father An- 
drew all success and God's choicest 
guidance in this grand work. 



ST. MICHAEL PROVINCE 

(France) 

In the January number of the 
"Revue de la Passion" under "Chroni- 
que Passioniste" we find a very inter- 
esting account of a three-week mission 
given by our Fathers in a small agri- 
cultural district. Three days before 
the formal opening of the mission the 
missionaries canvassed the parish 
making the "preparatory visits". The 
Mission opened with our usual proces- 
sion and the implanting of the Mis- 
sion-Cross on the platform. Armistice 
Day, which occurred during the course 
of the mission was commemorated 
with a special Mass in the fore-noon 
and again in the evening with a grand 
"Libera". This brought many Veter- 
ans to the church, who probably would 
not have come for the mere Mission. 
During the course of the Mission also 
a living "tableaux" of the mysteries 
of the Rosary was portrayed, giving 
the Missionary ample occasion to 
make applications from the life of 
Christ to the christian way of living. 
Another thing of note is the fact that 
special conferences were given, to the 
men, to the women, to the young men, 
to the young women and to the chil- 
dren. At the close of the mission a 
Cross was erected and blessed in the 
cemetery. 



SPAIN 

Through the courtesy of Fathers 
Roger and Barnabas we received a 

176 



paper from Fr. Bernard Monsegu, 
C.P., member of the recently estab- 
lished General Committee on Studies 
for our Congregation. The writer 
gives a glowing account of the de- 
velopments along intellectual lines in 
Passionist Spain since the revolution. 
We hope in a future issue of the 
PASSIONIST to give a detailed ac- 
count of what he has written. 

We have also scattered accounts of 
the great missionary work done by our 
Spanish Brethren in Latin America, 
a work that reminds us of the great 
pioneer work done in the Western 
part of our own country by Spanish 
Franciscans. On October 11th of last 
year eight missioners left Bilbao 
(Sacred Heart Province) for the new 
Prelature Nullius of Moyobamba that 
was confided to the Passionists by 
the Holy See. Our Fathers have 
labored there since 1942. Already in 
1921 they were in the nearby Mission 
of Maranon, now a Vicariate Apos- 
tolic. 

The same Province of the Sacred 
Heart is building a beautiful and 
large church in Bogota, Columbia, in 
connection with the Retreat there. 
From this headquarter the Fathers 
work among some 65,000 uncivilized 
aborigines. 

A similar work among the uncivil- 
ized tribes is done by our Spanish Fa- 
thers of the Province of the Precious 
Blood in Bolivia near La-Obrajes. 
The Fathers from the same Precious 
Blood Province are working along 
slightly different lines in Chile; here 
there is question of trying to make 
living Catholics out of nominal ones. 
The Fathers have three Retreats in 
Chile. Recently the Community in 



MARTIRES PASIONISTAS 

DUVUf.i. 






# & -g § 1 1 6 




Picture of the twenty-six Passionists who fell before the fury of the Com- 
munists during July, 1936. Their cause for Beatification is under way. (Cf. 
Passionist, Nov. 21, 1948). 

1. P. Juan Pedro de S. Antonio (Vicario) 2. Cho. Honorino de la V., 
Dolorosa 3. P. Niceforo de Jesus y Maria (Provincial) 4. Cho. Julio del 
Corazon de Jesus 5. P. German de Jesus y Maria (Rector) 6. Cho. 
Eufrasio del Amor Miser icordioso 7. P. Ildefonso de la Cruz 8. Cho. 
Fulgencio del Corazon de Maria 9. Cho. Jose Maria de Jesus Agonizante 
10. Cho. Jose Maria de Jesus 11. Cho. Tomas del Santisimo Sacramento 
12. Cho. Jose de los Sagrados Corazones 13. Cho. Felix de las Cinco 
Llagas 14. Cho. Jose de Jesus y Maria 15. Cho. Abilio de la Cruz 
16. P. Felipe del Sagrado Corazon de Maria 17. Cho. Laurino de Jesus 
Crucificado 18. Cho. Zacarias del Santisimo Sacramento 19. Hno. 
Felipe de S. Miguel 20. Cho. Epifanio de S. Miguel 21. Hno. Benito 
de la V. del Villar 22. P. Pedro del Corazon de Jesus 23. P. Justiniano 
de S. Gabriel de la Dolorosa 24. Hno. Pablo Maria de S. Jose 25. Cho. 
Maurilio del Nino Jesus 26. Hno. Anacario de la Inmaculada. 

177 




Church of the Passionist Father, showing the facade of the new Retreat under 
construction at Guadalajara, Mexico. 



Vina del Mar launched a new periodi- 
cal under the tutelage of our Lady of 
Lourdes. 



IMMACULATE HEART 
PROVINCE 

(N. Italy) 

The "Pilgrim Virgin" is visiting 
also the Passionist Monasteries in 
Italy. For example "La Voce di San 
Pancrazio" tells us of a most enthusi- 
astic reception at our Monastery 
Church in Pianezza. Father Vicar of 
the Retreat, we are told, was most 
solicitous about providing a worthy 
reception for the "Pilgrim Virgin." 
To take care of the spiritual side a 
Preparatory Triduum was held for the 
Coming of the Virgin. The young 



men of the Catholic Action Unit ad- 
vertised the event among the inhabi- 
tants. The streets were adorned with 
Triumphal arches, and the houses 
were hung with tapestery, etc. Since 
the arrival was to take place at night, 
all kinds of lanterns were used in the 
decorations. The whole facade of the 
church was lighted up. The high 
point was the arrival of the statue at 
Midnight, in the glow of lamps and 
lights, followed by almost the entire 
population. Enthusiasm ran so high 
that it was a difficult task to disperse 
the crowd after the reception cere- 
monies were completed. Another big 
demonstration took place at the de- 
parture ceremony at 9 a.m. 



According to descriptions the mis- 



178 



sionary labors of the Fathers of the 
Province are crowned with glowing 
success. Spontaneous applause is 
recorded at times, confessions so 
numerous that a sufficient number of 
priests are not available; in one in- 
stance, the Bishop assisted in hearing 
the men's confessions. A feature often 
mentioned is the making the way of 
the Cross through the streets of the 
city. Often the churches cannot hold 
the crowds during the mission. In 
one instance the close of the men's 
mission began with a midnight Mass. 
Enthusiastic processions to the ceme- 
tery are mentioned as well as closing 
processions with the erecting of the 
Mission Cross. (Note: we cannot re- 
frain from calling attention to the 
fact that our Fathers elsewhere also 
have Processions in connection with 
the mission. The latest issue of the 
Revue Passionist, from the Belgian 
Province, carries several pictures of 
Processions in connection with the 
mission, Processions through the 
streets of the city.) In the Mission 
account of the Province of the Im- 
maculate Heart there is also a note of 
sadness : the failure of the local clergy 
to continue the fruits of the mission. 

"II Divin Crocifisso" and "II San- 
tuario di N.S. delle Roche", two publi- 
cations of the Province, give great 
prominence to the foreign mission 
field supported by the Fathers of the 
Immaculate Heart in Tanganiyka, 
Africa. Both papers have also issued 
a very Passionistic Calendar for 1949 
which stresses both home and foreign 
mission work. Very lately several of 
the Fathers have been chosen to work 
in that field and have been given God- 



speed with beautiful departure cere- 
monies. 



IMMACULATE 
CONCEPTION PROVINCE 

(Argentina) 

The "Santa Cruz" parish bulletin 
from Holy Cross Church, Buenos 
Aires, Argentina, is certainly more 
than local or parochial in content and 
outlook. Besides a calendar of the 
coming Feasts, this twenty page bulle- 
tin contains the Gospel of the Sunday 
with a brief, pointed commentary. 

Then you'll find a classification of 
current films. There is usually an ex- 
tended, halfpage critique of any no- 
table film of the week. At present 
they are "plugging" Monsier Vincent 
— the documentary film on the life of 
St. Vincent de Paul. A novel feature 
of their Legion of decency List is the 
inclusion of two telephone numbers to 
call when in doubt about the classifi- 
cation of any particular film. 

The bulletins at hand, from last 
fall, feature the celebration of the 
Golden Jubilee of the foundation of 
the Confraternity of the Passion. An 
ambitious week-long program of 
events signalized the occasion. The 
program began with solemn Vespers 
on the eve of the Feast of the Holy 
Cross, featured a solemn Pontifical 
Mass, three days Triduum by way of 
retreat and conducted the Octave with 
General Communion of the Senior and 
Junior Confraternities plus open air 
Procession on the following Sunday. 

That the Confraternity is vigorous 
and active is immediately evident from 
some of the projects it has sponsored. 
At present the men of the Confra- 



179 



ternity are concerned with the erec- 
tion of the Holy Cross in each Chris- 
tian Home. The women's work of zeal 
is the making and distribution of the 
Black Scapular of the Passion. 

Another of the events of the "Pas- 
sion Week" that celebrated this Jubi- 
lee was a "missionary congress" de- 
signed to stimulate interest in the Pas- 
sionist missionary vocation. 

It is of interest to American Pas- 
sionists to learn that the first Direc- 
tor of this active Confraternity was 
Fr. Louis Hochendonner, uncle of our 
Brother Louis and one time member of 
our Province. During the course of 
years the Confraternity had a succes- 
sion of distinguished Directors; fore- 
most among them is Most Reverend 
Father Albert, our present Father 
General. 

The mid-November issue of Santa 
Cruz is dedicated to Most Reverend 
Father General on the occasion of his 
Feast, St. Albert, and also on his 
official arrival in Argentina. The wel- 
come extended to Father Albert by 
his co-patriots must have been im- 
mense; it even extended to loud ap- 
plause as he stepped off the ship and 
later again at the Santa Crux 
Church. The reason for Father Al- 
bert's visit to Argentina was the pre- 
siding at the Provincial Chapter which 
took place during the last days of No- 
vember and the first of December. 

The list of the "Works of the Minis- 
try" for 1948 which two issues of the 
Santa Cruz carries looks similar to 
ours as far as quality is concerned; 
naturally they are not as numerous 
since the number of members is much 
smaller than in our Province. 



PROVINCE OF ST. GABRIEL 

(Belgium) 

November 21st was quite a festive 
day for the Retreat of St. Paul of the 
Cross in Natoye. The day was set 
aside to commemorate and to celebrate 
the 50th anniversary of the religious 
Profession of Father Xavier, who is 
also the founder of the Retreat. Fa- 
ther entered the Congregation at the 
age of 17 in France; in 1897 France, 
Belgium and Holland were one Pro- 
vince. After Ordination he soon was 
active and highly successful on the 
Missions. World War I put an end to 
his missionary career, in our sense of 
the word, but in his zeal he requested 
to be an Army Chaplain. In this 
capacity he was sent to London by the 
renowned Cardinal Mercier and there, 
as well as in many other parts of 
England he did heroic work among 
Belgian Refugees for four full years. 
In 1920 he was sent to Natoye. There 
he bought a residence, transformed 
it into a Retreat, and added an addi- 
tion to serve as a Preparatory Semi- 
nary. Soon however all this proved 
inadequate for the needs of the grow- 
ing Province. Thus it was natural for 
him, as an architect, to strike out 
boldly in the direction of a new church 
and monastery. The work was begun 
in 1930 and completed in 1933. Today 
the Monastery beside the beautiful 
church houses some 20 Fathers and 
Brothers and about 40 Preparatory 
Seminarians. After that was com- 
pleted Father was again seen zeal- 
ously at work on the Mission Plat- 
form. His great charity always 
touched a sympathetic chord, especial- 
ly with the population of Natoye dur- 
ing the tragic years from 1940 to 



180 



GOLDEN JUBILARIAN. From Belgium come these pictures of the splendid 
celebration held at St. Paul of the Cross Retreat, Natoye, Belgium, on the 
occasion of the Golden Jubilee of Reverend Father Xavier's religious profession 
as a Passionist. Fr. Xavier is the founder of the Retreat at Natoye, a 
beautiful Retreat built in the Renaissance style, completed in 1932. 




(Above) Reverend Father Xavier, C.Pi As the founder of a new Retreat, he 
knows what it is to stand at the foot of the Cross. (Right) View of the 
Church during the Solemn Mass of Thanksgiving, celebrated by the Reverend 
Jubilarian. Ad Multos Annos! 



1945. "THE PASSIONIST" wishes 
even at this late date to extend its 
sincerest wishes to the Jubilarian, do- 
ing so on general principles and also 
as a token of gratitude and apprecia- 
tion for the interest and appreciation 
he has shown towards our work. 



The Fathers in Belgium with their 
big mission field in Congo are by no 
means neglecting their Mission acti- 
vities at home. The December number 
of their "Revue Passioniste" presents 
a two page picture-scene of Proces- 
sions, tableau's, etc., done on the mis- 



181 



sions. Beyond that, our attention was 
called to a Missionary Conference held 
within the past year during which 
some very important decisions were 
reached. Modern and local conditions 
seem to have advised some additions 
to our ordinary method. For in- 
stance, if we understood correctly, 
each mission is to be preceded by a 
Mission for the children; moreover, 
consistent and active preparation for 
the mission is to begin three months 
before the opening, utilizing modern 
and systematic methods. The terri- 
tory of the mission is precisely local- 
ized in the town or city and all who 
should make the mission are visited 
personally by a missionary; absentees 
during the mission are revisited. The 
mission lasts from 3 to 6 weeks and 
requires the services of at least six 
missionaries. 



AFRICA 



Off and on in the past we have been 
able to present a word or so about our 
Brethren in the Belgian Congo. But 
as Father Stanislaus, our recent cor- 
respondent from Tshumbe St. Marie 
writes, here of late the Vicariate has 
become almost a forgotten coin. It is 
with great satisfaction that we can 
relay some very interesting data about 
the mission, with the fond hope that 
this notice might fan to life some 
ember-vocation to that field, or lessen 
the concern of the Missionaries about 
material necessities. Surely these 
lines are intended to increase our sup- 
plications for God's most abundant 
blessing on those heroes in the "black" 
forests. 

Our Belgian Province of St. Gabriel 



sponsors this mission. The first Fa- 
thers left Europe for the Congo in 
1930. Up to 1936, when the mission 
became an independent Prefecture" 
Apostolic, the fathers were under the 
Scheutt Fathers in the Vicariate of 
Kassai. During those six years also 
a large tract that had been expected 
to be given to the Passionist Mission 
was handed over by the Holy See to 
the Picpus Fathers. When in 1936 
the territory became a separate Pas- 
sionist Prefecture with Monsignor 
Hagendorens, C.P., as Prefect Apos- 
tolic, there were only four mission sta- 
tions. By 1940 a new mission was 
opened and by 1945 two further sta- 
tions were started, plus a leper colony 
near the Mission of Tshumbe Ste. 
Marie. In 1947 the territory was 
raised to the dignity of a Vicariate 
and Monsignor Hagendorens conse- 
crated as its first Vicar Apostolic. At 
the close of 1948 the Vicariate had 3 
native priests, one ordained as far 
back as 1945. The following is an 
enumeration of the Mission stations 
with their personnel as of November 
21, 1948. Tsumbe Ste Marie, the resi- 
dence of the Vicar Apostolic and 6 
Fathers and two Brothers; besides the 
Church there is a normal school for 
boys and girls, a general hospital and 
a maternity hospital. Lodja, the resi- 
dence of the Religious Superior with 
three Fathers and one Brother. Lube- 
fu with three Fathers, one of whom is 
a native; here also a dispensary is 
run. Katako-Kombe with four Fa- 
thers, one a native, and one Brother; 
a general and a maternity hospital. 
Bena-Dibele with three Fathers, one 
a native, and one Brother. Okolo, 
three Fathers with a dispensary and 



182 



maternity hospital. Omendjadi with 
three Fathers. Dikungu, a Leper 
Colony, with one Father. There are 
also plans on foot for establishing a 
new mission to which will be attached 
a School of Agriculture. In three of 
the above posts there are Dutch Fran- 
ciscan Sisters and two of them have 
Passionist Sisters of Tirlemont. At 




Native Passionist Teaching Brothers. These Brothers, founded in 1944, now 
number four Professed Brothers, and eight Aspirants. (Below) Brothers and 
Aspirants in the Chapel of their monastery. (Right) Interior view of the 
Brothers' monastery, showing a corridor, with two of the Professed Brothers, 
in their distinctive habit. Tshumbe Ste Marie (Saukuru) Belgian Congo. 



present three of the Fathers are 
taking courses in the Louvain Uni- 
versity along the lines of colonization, 
one specializing in agriculture. To 
complete the picture it must be added 
that two of the Fathers are members 
of the Province of our Lady of Holy 
Hope in Holland. 



The mention of Brothers in the per- 
sonnel above needs a bit of explana- 
tion. They are native teaching 
Brothers, although under the direc- 
tion of the Bishop and their Superior 
they also engage in works of charity. 
Their foundation goes back to 1940. 
In that year there were a group of 



183 



young men who had finished the 
course in the normal school of 
Tshumbe and felt inclined to the re- 
ligious life. One of the Fathers was 
appointed to take charge of them. 
The Decree of canonical erection by 
the then Prefect, now Vicar Apostolic, 
was issued in 1944 and the first Pro- 
fession followed in 1945. At present 
there are four Professed Brothers and 
eight Aspirants. Of the latter three 
have or soon will start their canonical 
Postulantship. So far none of the first 
four have deserted their vocation. On 
account of the fact that the entire 
atmosphere is pagan and the parents 
of the boys have not entered the 
church, the time of probation for final 
profession is quite long. They join 
the ranks at the commencement of 
their third year in the normal school 
and after finishing school are two 
years longer under observation and 
trial before they can begin their 
canonical Postulantship. After the 
Novitiate they make temporary Pro- 
fession three times for one year and 
two times for three years. During the 
last (ninth) year of temporary Pro- 
fession they make another Novitiate 
before final vows. They wear a blue 
habit (during the war it was impos- 
sible to get black cloth) and instead 
of our mantle they wear a cape reach- 
ing to the elbows. They are not as 
yet officially affiliated with our Con- 
gregation, but do wear our "Sign". 
They wear no sandals but go entirely 
barefoot, as do all the natives. The 
Brothers who are engaged in teach- 
ing spend their extra time in prepar- 
ing for their classes. The others, e.g. 
Novice and Postulants divide their 



time between manual labor and study, 
the latter to prepare for their teach- 
ing career. All effort is made to keep 
the actual teachers able teachers andi 
to prepare the others. The principal 
Patron of the new Congregation isi 
Saint Gabriel of the Sorrowful 
Mother. The letter we have before 
us with this information ends with a 
strong pleading for Spiritual and Ma- 
terial Benefactors. Spiritual, because 
although the boys are very fervent 
and good willed they do find it hard to 
keep the necessary silence and to ac- 
custom themselves to order. Material 
benefactors because the new Congre- 
gation is living on alms from the 
Bishop. We hope the plea will find a 
willing ear! 

The "Revue Passioniste", a periodi- 
cal issued by the Fathers of the Bel- 
gian Province, gives the following sta- 
tistics on the Congo Mission: Terri- 
tory: 60,000 square kilometers; Mis- 
sionary priests: 28; Native Priests: 
3; Missionary Brothers: 6; Native 
Brothers: 4; Major Seminarians: 5; 
Minor Seminarians: 10; Missionary 
Sisters: 24; Catechists: 380; Catho- 
lics: 28,878; Protestants: 6,700; Cate- 
chumens: 1,505; Mohometans: 14; Pa- 
gans: 143,000 Primary Schools: 452; 
Pupils: 15,897; Normal School: 1; 
Normal Students: 124; Teachers: 
455; Catholic Marriages: 324 (one 
year); Adult Baptisms: 873; Infant 
Baptisms: 691; Baptisms in danger of 
death: 549; Holy Communions: 
346,290; Hospitals: 14; Consultations: 
184,720; Leper Colony: 1; Maternity 
Hospitals 4; Births in these: 957; 
Print Shop: 1; Periodical: 1. 



184 



OUR LADY OF HOLY HOPE 
PROVINCE 

(Holland) 

Another indication of the great vi- 
tality in the Province of Our Lady of 
Holy Hope is the founding of a new 
religious Community. It is known as 
the "Little Sisters of St. Gemma". 
This project was long in the offing but 
only last December 27th did the form- 
al election take place. These new Sis- 
ters, from what we can gather, are 
destined primarily to help the Fa- 
thers of the Province in the foreign 
Missions. A Passionist Nun from the 
Monastery at Sittard, Mother Mary 
Vincentia, was exclaustrated by the 
Holy See in order to be the first Su- 
perior of the new Institute. The resi- 
dence of the Sisters for the time being 
is to be a separate part of the new 
Minor Seminary in Mook. 

On the designated day the Most 
Reverend Bishop Lemmens, Ordinary 
of Roermond, arrived at the Minor 
Seminary. The solemn services 
opened with Pontifical Benediction, at 
which His Excellency delivered a 
very inspiring address in which, 
among other things, he stated that it 
was one of the happiest occasions in 
his life, to be instrumental in taking 
the first step towards the canonical 
erection of a new religious organiza- 
tion. He stressed the obligation of 
the six young women, who were en- 
tering as postulants, to be real Sisters 
of St. Gemma. After Benediction in 
the Chapel of the Seminary a Pro- 
cession was formed, consisting of 
Cross bearer with acolytes, (three 
Passionist Students) followed by the 
six postulants in secular attire with 



their Superioress, then the Minor 
Seminarians, C.P., followed by the 
relatives of the Postulants, then the 
Major C.P. Seminarians in surplice, 
followed by the major clergy, both 
secular and religious. Finally the 
Procession climaxed with the Bishop 
carrying the Bl. Sacrament. In this 
procession some 150 people wound 
their way from the Chapel of the 
Minor Seminary to that wing of the 
same building which is reserved for 
the Little Sisters of St. Gemma. In 
their chapel the Most Reverend Bishop 
placed the Blessed Sacrament and, 
after a few encouraging words, re- 
tired. A simple ceremony but, we 
hope, auguring great things for the 
Glory of God and the spread of His 
kingdom. 

Besides the newly opened mission in 
Borneo our Brethren in Holland have 
for many a year sponsored the Bul- 
garian mission, now suffering so tragi- 
cally. On Gaudete Sunday the stu- 
dents staged an elegant program on 
"Church Unity" with a special refer- 
ence to Bulgaria. The program was 
made up of lecture, song and poem, 
and even drama, all on the subject of 
reunion. 

The Students also continue to edit 
their publication "Staurosophia". The 
last issue received contained an inter- 
esting study on the devotion of our 
Holy Founder towards the Divine In- 
fancy. Confrater Pius, editor of the 
Staurosophia lately sent a Latin letter 
to all his readers, visualized as the 
Passionist Students of Our Lady of 
Holy Hope Province. The letter is 
just about in the form of a syllogism. 
By nature our young blood urges us 
to activity. Also we have made the 



185 



fourth vow. We can no longer stand 
idle, let us show ourselves to be real 
Passionists, burning with love for the 
Crucified. What can we do? A sug- 
gestion. Whoever in his spiritual 
reading comes across a fitting text 
from Scripture, the Church Fathers, 
or Supreme Pontiffs, let him write it 
out on a card and post it on the Bul- 
letin Board for common use. Thus all 
will in time have a fine collection of 
texts, that will be very useful later 
in missionary work. Beyond this it 
will be a great help to foster conversa- 
tion along the lines of our vocation. 



ST. PATRICK PROVINCE 

(Ireland) 

"Passionist and Servites unite be- 
neath the Cross to bring Novena to 
Eire" is the prominent text of a pic- 
turesque page in "the Novena Notes" 
of December 10th, 1948. Thus notice 
is given of the introduction of the first 
Sorrowful Mother Novena in Ireland, 
which was given, significantly, in the 
Passionist Holy Cross Church in Bel- 
fast. Fully three pages feature the 
event with picture and word. Pic- 
tures of the interior and exterior of 
Holy Cross Church which serves some 
10,000 souls are presented. There is 
also a picture of Fr. James M. Keane, 
O.S.M., founder of "Our Sorrowful 
Mother Novena", who conducted the 
first Novena services in Eire, and one 
of Fr. Bonaventure, C.P., pastor of 
Holy Cross Church, who, by the way, 
has a Passionist sister in the USA, 
Sister M. Amadeus, C.P. Beautifully 
centered on the page are the Cruci- 
fix and the Sorrowful Mother, flanked 
by our "Sign" and the escutcheon of 
the Servites. On a third page, thf 



Novena Director, Fr. Clarence, O.S.M. 
nicely draws a parallel between our 
Congregation and his Order : Both be- 
gun in Italy, both started on a moun- 
tain, Argentaro and Senario, both 
similar, if not identical, in ideals, 
namely, to contemplate and to be ac- 
tive at the foot of the Cross with 
Mary. At the end of these musings 
the writer wonders if heaven did not 
make a mistake by giving St. Gabriel 
of the Sorrowful Virgin to the Pas- 
sionists, instead of to the Servites. 
Finally, a hope is expressed that even 
as the Dominicans and other older 
Orders made the Rosary so common 
in Ireland thus the Servites and Pas- 
sionists will be instrumental in 
making the Novena Devotions in 
honor of the Sorrowful Mother a last- 
ing devotion. 



A few weeks before the inaugura- 
tion of the Sorrowful Mother Novena 
in Holy Cross Church, the same 
church was the scene of a ceremony of 
another nature, the burial of Fr. Syl- 
vius Rudden, C.P. Father Sylvius, 
member of St. Patrick Province, died 
at the comparatively early age of 
forty-seven. He was a successful mis- 
sionary and of a very sincere and deep 
character. He had the privilege of 
passing to eternity on the Feast of 
Mary's Presentation. That His Lord- 
ship Most Reverend Dr. Mageean, 
Bishop of Down and Connor, presided 
at the obsequies, proclaims the high 
esteem accorded Fr. Sylvius and his 
fellow-Passionists in Ireland. 

"The Cross" of January gives notice 
of the death of our Fr. Bonaventure in 
a very sincere and appreciative man- 
ner. R.I.P. 



186 



GERMAN VICE-PROVINCE 

Canonical changes have taken place 
in the Vice-Province to the effect that 
Very Reverend Father Walter, Vice- 
Provincial has resigned his position as 
Rector of Holy Trinity Retreat in 
Schwarzenfeld, leaving this post to V. 
Rev. Father Frederick. St. Gabriel 
Retreat in Pasing-Munich has been 
made the official residence of the Fa- 
ther Vice-Provincial. As a conse- 
quence the full regular observance 
was introduced there in the early part 
of January: mitigated observance had 
been in force up to that date because 
St. Gabriel's is also the Preparatory 
Seminary of the Vice-Province. Ma- 
terial repairs on the Provincial resi- 



dence in consequence to war-damages 
move along slowly, but steadily. 
Meat rations supply meat twice a 
month for the Community. The 
number of boys in the Preparatory 
Seminary at the beginning of the year 
was 9. Fr. Dominic, who returned 
from Russian captivity is slowly re- 
covering and hopes to be back in the 
monastery some time this coming 
spring. His classmate, Fr. Joseph, 
has been transferred to Siberia by the 
Russian authorities. We cannot but 
look with anxious eye to our Brethren 
in the German Vice-Province because 
its Austrian territory is a next door 
neighbor to Hungary, which latter 
country but so lately held the head- 
lines of our newspapers. 



PROVINCE OF THE HOLY CROSS 



IMMACULATE 
CONCEPTION RETREAT 

(Chicago) 

We began our Christmas feasting 
here a few days early with the cele- 
bration of Father Rector's Silver 
Jubilee of Ordination. Monday, the 
20th, Father sang a Solemn High 
Mass in the Parish Church, with Rev. 
Fathers Vicar and Conrad assisting 
him. As usual, Father Matthias 
preached most eloquently. Holy Mass 
was followed by a banquet in the Pro- 
fessed Recreation, to which the at- 
tendant secular clergy and religious 
were invited. The Students provided 
a bit of family entertainment in the 
evening with a program dealing with 
Father's life and illustrious Passionist 
career. 

Three of Father Herman's class- 
mates likewise had silver jubilee cele- 



brations here in Chicago during the 
week: Father Timothy, at the Parish 
the Sunday preceding; Father Mala- 
chy on the day following Fr. Rector's; 
and Father Urban at St. Cecelia's on 
the day after Christmas. May the 
"many years" to come be filled with 
the fruits of these past twenty-five of 
labour in union with Him on the 
Cross. 

Christmas was kept in truly Pas- 
sionistic style. Our Solemn Midnight 
Mass was preceded by a Bambino 
procession from the Students' Recrea- 
tion to the Choir, where Solemn 
Matins was sung. Very Reverend 
Father Provincial was assisted by V. 
Rev. Father Neil and Father Carl. 
Father Barnabas preached a moving 
and, of course, most Scriptural little 
ferverina for the assembled Com- 
munity of Students, Brothers and 
Charlie Fox. 



187 



New Year's Eve saw the arrival 
from the west coast of eight of the 
returning Missionaries from China. 
They certainly afforded us a very, 
very Happy New Year. Our prayers 
are with them (and our erstwhile 
Missionary-Director, Fr. Paul, sees to 
that) that God may preserve their 
Chinese flocks from harm. 



HOLY CROSS RETREAT 

(Cincinnati) 

We here in Cincinnati are very 
happy to welcome Fr. Carl to our 
midst. He comes as assistant Director 
of Laymen's Retreats. We know that 
with his personality and willingness 
to work, the Laymen's Retreat here at 
Holy Cross will go places. 

On January 28th, the Pilgrim Sta- 
tue of our Lady of Fatima spent 
about an hour at the Passionist Nuns 
Convent in Marydale Ky. Frs. Ra- 
phael, Bernard, Sylvester, Edwin, 
Charles and Carl went over to the 
short services. The priests who ac- 
companied the statue: A Carmelite 
Father and a Scarborough Father 
from Canada, remarked that the Pas- 
sionist Fathers have always given the 
Statue a great welcome wherever it 
has been. They remarked especially 
on the edifying welcome given by the 
Passionists at Jamaica, N. J. and 
St. Meinrad, Ind. 

In a Christmas letter to Father 
Charles, Archbishop McNicholas had 
this to say: "I see that you have a 
very heavy Retreat Schedule for 1949. 
By your unselfish and extraordinary 
work as a Director of Laymen's Re- 
treats you are making a noteworthy 
contribution to the cause of religion in 
the Archdiocese". 



SACRED HEART RETREAT 

(Louisville) 

Christmas this year was celebrated 
very holily and happily by the com- 
munity of Sacred Heart Retreat. The 
feast day devil was on the job though, 
contriving as he did to have the rattle 
sounded twenty minutes late for 
Solemn Matins. On this account, 
Matins were interrupted after the 
second Nocturn and the Midnight 
Mass was begun. But even so, enough 
of the beautiful Christmas chant was 
sung to put us in the spirit of the 
feast. 

The Christmas season afforded the 
six newly ordained Deacons an oppor- 
tunity to be initiated into their new 
functions. Each of them was allowed 
to distribute Communion on Christmas 
or the day following, and all had a 
turn as Deacon at the Solemn Masses 
on and around Christmas. Besides, 
they are acting regularly in the role 
of exposing the Blessed Sacrament. 
These young Levites eagerly await 
their ordination to the priesthood in 
June. 

The joy of the New Year was some- 
what dulled by the fact that Father 
Rector was confined to his room with 
a severe cold. However, his strong 
constitution was prompt in throwing 
off the sickness. 

The afternoon of Epiphany found 
the Students as guests of the Xaver- 
ian Brothers at St. Xavier High 
School. The skill of the Brothers 
proved too much for them in the 
basketball game that was played, but 
the humiliation of the defeat was com- 
pensated for by the accustomed hospi- 
tality of the Brothers. 



188 



Improvements around the place con-, 
tinue in full swing under the master 
hand of Very Rev. Father Rector. To 
one who has been living here during 
the past year and a half, there is no 
mistaking the fact that the Retreat 
is undergoing a general overhauling. 
At present all the windows and 
screens are being re-painted, much of 
the interior woodwork is being re- 
finished, and some of the walls are re- 
ceiving a scrubbing. Those who visit 
this Retreat in future will no doubt 
find it brighter and more home-like 
as a result of these much needed im- 
provements. Father Rector is great- 
ly to be congratulated for the care 
with which he is undertaking this 
much needed repair work. 

Our Community was blessed in hav- 
ing a very good Retreat Master for 
the annual Retreat which was held 
from February 6-13. Rev. Father 
Felix Hackett, C.P. of the Province of 
St. Paul of the Cross conducted the 
exercises, and he proved an inspira- 
tion to all, by example as well as by 
word. We are all very grateful to 
Father for the helps he afforded us 
through his solid, well-delivered con- 
ferences. 

Work on the new St. Agnes School 
is progressing most satisfactorily. 
The set-backs that are unavoidable in 
a building project have been small and 
have not so far lessened the proba- 
bility that the building will be ready 
for use this coming Fall. 

For the Brethren who have ever 
been stationed at Sacred Heart Re- 
treat it will be of interest to know- 
that our next door neighbor, Mt. St. 
Agnes, is well underway with its huge 



building plan. Federal aid has been 
promised and the Archdiocese has set 
up the machinery for a million dollar 
drive towards the cause. In the course 
of putting down the foundation much 
rock has been run into and as a conse- 
quence much blasting has been going 
on for now several weeks. The sec- 
tion to house the boiler plant is al- 
ready far above the ground. It is said 
that when the new building is com- 
pleted it will be open also for male 
patients. A new name for the institu- 
tion is also in the offing, namely Our 
Lady of Peace. The change is no 
doubt partially due to the proximity 
of our St. Agnes Church. The new 
name ought to make a few less head- 
aches for the mail man, the Taxi 
Driver etc. 

On February 17th a tragic fire in 
our vicinity on Newburg Road com- 
pletely destroyed the Beutel Mansion. 
Older members of the Province will 
remember the family as friends of the 
Passionists of very long standing. 
Miss Dora Beutel lost her life in the 
fire and the remains were not found 
till the day after the fire. The funeral 
took place in St. Agnes Church the 
following Monday, several of our Fa- 
thers and also Diocesan Clergy at- 
tending. Our sincerest sympathies 
are extended to the three surviving 
brothers. 

Father Valentine, C.P., Rector of 
Holy Cross Monastery attended the 
funeral of his cousin, Miss Josephine 
Leitsch, invalid for some years. The 
Rose-Leitsch Family are also to be 
numbered among our benefactors. 
The beautiful monstrance used in our 
St. Agnes Church is a gift of Mrs. 
John R. Rose and Family. R.I. P. 



189 



MOTHER OF 
GOOD COUNSEL RETREAT 

(St. Louis) 

The Christmas Season's atmosphere 
was much enhanced by the fine rendi- 
tions of the Choir during church ser- 
vices, all under the capable direction 
of Fr. Cronan. During the Holidays 
the various classes directed by Frs. 
Herbert and Germain presented 
several short plays. This gave the 
students an opportunity to display 
their dramatic talent in presence of 
the Faculty. 

Our Christmas Joys also had a note 
of sorrow this year caused by the 
death of Mrs. Matthews, Mother of 
our Father Martin, C.P. The exse- 
quies were held in Sacred Heart 
Church with Father Martin, Cele- 
brant, Fr. Walter, Deacon, Fr. Her- 
bert, Subdeacon, Fr. Cyprian, Master 
of Ceremonies. The moving and elo- 
quent sermon was delivered by our 
Very Reverend Father Rector. Fr. 
Cronan directed the students during 
the singing of the Mass. The PAS- 
SIONIST offers its sincerest sympa- 
thies to Father Martin. 

The weather has been making the 
headlines lately in all the papers of 
the country. We, in St. Louis, had 
two ice-storms within a week or so, 
the severest here in twenty-five years. 
Fortunately we suffered no serious 
damage beyond the fact that some of 
our large trees, unable to sustain the 
weight of ice-covered limbs, lost some 
of their branches. For several days 
the boys could skate on the ball field 
and on the walks around the semi- 
nary. 

Mid-year examinations took place 



from January 26th to 28th. From 
January 30th to February 4th both 
the Professed Religious and the Semi- 
narians made their annual Retreat 
under the most capable direction of 
Fr. Daniel for the Professed and Fr. 
Canute for the boys. 

During the last week of January 
the Sisters of Charity of the Good 
Shepherd observed the centenary of 
their residence in St. Louis. On Janu- 
ary 27th our V. Rev. Fr. Rector was 
celebrant at the Good Shepherd's 
large Institution, offering a Solemn 
Requiem High Mass. A few days 
later the local morning paper carried 
several pictures of the centenial cele- 
bration among which Fr. Rector's pic- 
ture was quite prominent. 

The Professed library is being en- 
larged by adding to it the room ad- 
joining the telephone booth. The room 
took a new plastering and a new 
ceiling plus a number of new book- 
cases to hold the many new books 
constantly streaming in. 



ST. FRANCIS RETREAT 

(St. Paul, Ks.) 

Christmas Eve saw the sanctuary of 
St. Francis Church spider-webbed 
with plasterer's scaffolding. Christ- 
mas just wouldn't be Christmas unless 
the Church were properly decorated. 
But what could we do with pipes 
hanging all over the altar? The Lord 
was on our side, though, and in no 
time flat the scaffolding was broken 
down and the pipes were piled in the 
most inconspicuous corner of the 
vestibule. Then, the work began. The 
ladies of the parish dusted the Church 
while the Novices cleaned the sanc- 
tuary. Our dead-line for all Christmas 



190 



decorations was Vespers, but, due to 
circumstances beyond our control we 
finished in time for Matins — some 
shaven and showered and some other- 
wise. Christmas day was bright, 
cheery, and chilly, but no snow, after 
all this is Kansas. Among other 
things that Santa brought was a com- 
plete and larger set of crib figures for 
the Choir. The day, indeed, was well 
spent — both with the Christ Child to 
Whom we rendered due thanks with 
the unusual solemn ceremonies, and 
with the Community. 

December 29, 1948. Fire! ! Noon 
recreation was interrupted as we 
caught a glimpse of a fire-engine dash- 
ing through the Novices' Garden lay- 
ing a hose from the hydrant to the 
front of the Church. Naturally every- 
one went out to see what was up. The 
plasterers, still working on the Church 
ceiling, had a little pot-bellied stove 
in the vestibule. It tipped over while 
the men were at lunch and flames 
quickly spread through half of the 
vestibule and almost up to the choir- 
loft. The St. Paul volunteer Fire 
Dept. got things under control before 
long so that only minor damages re- 
sulted. About 2:00 P.M. the Par- 
son's Fire Dept. arrived to give a 
helping hand, but too late. 

We may not have had a white 
Christmas, but northern cities had 
nothing on little "ole" St. Paul when 
January came. It all started with a 
little rain on the night of Jan. 2. It 
all ended in a sleet storm which 
brought in its wake a few inconveni- 
ences. The electric power was off for 
three days as the monks said their 
Masses by candle-light. The old 
kerosene lamps were quickly dusted 



off and hung up in strategic places. 
The telephone lines were cut for al- 
most a week until Fr. Master and a 
couple of novices decided to become 
linesmen. They spliced the broken 
wires and re-hung them in a quaint 
amateur style, and then asked Fr. 
Rector to make a call. A number was 
dialed, a buzz was heard, but that was 
all. The company men came out the 
following day, saw the repaired lines, 
went to town to insert a new fuze for 
our line, and called the monastery. 
The job wasn't too bad after all. No 
electricity for St. Paul meant that no 

Left :— Brother Thomas, C. P. (former- 
ly John Brummett of Toledo, Ohio) 

Right: — Brother George, C.P. (former- 
ly Joseph Stoiber of Riverside, Calif- 
ornia) 

First Profession— Feb. 2, 1949 




water could be pumped, so conserva- 
tion was the order of the day. Last 
but not least was the near-disaster- 
ous effects the storm had on the no- 
vices' garden. Everything was 
weighed down with ice and none of 
the trees escaped a too-efficient prun- 
ing job. 

Ice and snow came and went 
throughout January and during early 
February, rather often, too, for St. 
Paul. Below zero weather wasn't 
something we just talked about either. 
But, now the birds are chirping again 
and the Neosho is drawing nigh unto 
flood stage. 

Brothers Thomas and George made 
their temporary profession on Febru- 
ary 2nd in the little basement chapel 
of St. Francis Church with the Com- 
munity as well as visitors from 
Toledo and California in attendance. 
Brother George's dad is still on his 
way home, as far as we know. He's 
snow-bound in Wyoming. 

College Hall becomes the Little 
Red House, or at least a reasonable 
facsimile, as the Federal Law pro- 
hibiting the teaching of religion in 
state-supported school buildings is en- 
forced. Classes are also being con- 
ducted in the basement chapel daily 
from 3:00 to 4:00. 

Fr. Master's feast day, February 
15, was fittingly celebrated by the 
Community and the Novices. Brother 
Philip made sure all the trimmings 
were there, too. 



ST. GABRIELS RETREAT 

(Des Moinm) 

Dec. 22 marked the Silver Jubilee 
of three of the priests here: Frs. 
Louis, Malachy and Peter. The cele- 

192 



bration was strictly de familia, thus 
eliminating much of the work ofter 
connected with jubilee celebrations. 

We had a wonderful white Christ- 
mas. For the first time in many 
years we were able to have all the li- 
turgical services. Midnight Mass is 
forbidden in the Diocese, so we had 
ours privately in the Choir. Christ- 
mas morning we had another Solemn 
Mass in the Chapel. The students' 
singing was beautiful. Having stu- 
dents in the house makes one realise 
how empty a community is without 
them. 

One of our snow storms left the 
driveway buried under drifts 4 to 6 
feet deep. And with the thermometer 
down as low as 14 below zero, it was 
several days before we shoveled our; 
way out. 

The only change in personnel is 
Fr. Conell, who left us to take up his 
duties as Provincial Secretary. 

The semester exams were Feb. 4 
and 5. The next day we began our 
annual retreat. Judging from reports 
about our retreat master, Fr. Berch- 
mans, we had hopes for a wonderful 
retreat. But the reality was far bet- 
ter than the anticipation. 



MATER DOLOROSA 
RETREAT 

(Sierra Madre) 

Los Angeles is no rail center, and 
hence we of Mater Dolorosa Retreat 
never have the transient visitors of a 
center like Chicago or Cincinnati. 
But when it comes to international 
travel, why we really come to our own. 
The day before Christmas Eve, eight 
of our Chinese Missionaries came in 




n unusual sight, Mater Dolorosa Retreat, Sierra Madre, California, draped 
in a mantle of snow. That's Brother Gerald, shoveling away snow. 



rather unexpectedly. Needless to say 
ive were glad that over the Christmas 
Holidays we could enjoy such a lively 
and high spirited recreation with our 
Brethren, veterans of many a cam- 
paign for Christ in the Orient. 



In January we had the honor of 
having our Father General with us 
again. In order to make connections 
with a ship sailing for Australia, he 
came up from Peru by way of Central 
America. This also gave him oppor- 







Passionist Chinese Missionaries return home from 
the Communist-ridden and much troubled missions 
in the Far East. Mater Dolorosa Retreat was happy 
to play host to these returning Missionaries over 
the Christmas Season. (Left to Right) Fr. Linus, 
Fr. James Lambert, Very Rev. Fr. Lambert, (Rector 
of Mater Dolorosa Retreat), Fr. Leo, Fr. Wendelin, 
Fr. Ernest, Fr. Aloysius, Fr. Michael. 



>; 



«s 



m 



m *cj 



tunity of a stopover with our Brethren 
in Mexico City. On the other side of 
the equator they are enjoying balmy 
summer weather; so Father General 
had to pack away his Panama, and 
purchase a felt hat and an overcoat 
for the climate we were having here. 
During Father General's stay we 
had many an enjoyable recreation as 
His Paternity told us about the mis- 
sion work of our Brethren among the 
savages that live along the headwaters 
of the mighty Amazon. His lively ac- 
count of his desperate flight over the 
Andes was enough to send a tingle 
up your spine. Because he had to keep 
the reservation on his ship for Aus- 
tralia, Father General did not want 
to "sweat out" any delay in waiting 
for the weather to lift for the regular 
commercial airliners to fly the Andes. 
By rail, burro and canoe, the journey 
takes almost two months. So Father 
General readily agreed, when a bene- 
factor offered to take him in his pri- 
vate plane, not over the Andes, but 
through them. It was an experience 
he would never forget, His Paternity 
assured us — daring the air-currents, 
as they darted under and around the 
clouds in their little two-seated plane. 
Sometimes the mighty bulk of a moun- 
tain-peak would loom up almost with- 
in arm's reach of their frail craft. At 
his journey's end other adventures 
awaited him along the banks of rivers 
infested with man-eating crocidiles. 
But he was determined to have first- 
hand information of what our 
Brethren have to contend with in their 
arduous missions among the head- 
hunters along the upper Amazon. 



only a good, solid "Passionistic" Re- 
treat, but also much welcome news- 
from the Brethren "back East". But 
we fear Father was left cold, literally 
by the California climate during his J 
stay. "Unusual" was not the word to* 
describe the spell of cold and snow; 
it was simply "unheard of". To il- 
lustrate just what we mean for former 
residents of Sierra Madre we are en- 
closing snapshots of "Sierra Madre 
Snow Scenery". 



Fr. Roland's coming brought us not 



All during December heavy trucks 
were lumbering up the hill to the 
building site of our new Laymen's Re- 
treat House. Picayunish attempts 
were made on the part of some resi- 
dents along Sunnyside Street to block 
any approach by way of our new road, 
by having their street closed to heavy 
truck traffic. But energetic and pru- 
dent action on the part of Fr. Rector 
blocked the efforts of these trouble- 
makers. 

Every morning promptly at eight 
the whistle blows on the hill above us, 
and a big crew sets to work pouring 
concrete for the new retreat-house. In 
spite of our spell of "Eastern 
Weather", Fr. Neil assures us that 
the building is rising according to 
schedule. 

ST. PAUL'S RETREAT 

(Detroit) 

The Community's celebration of the 
Twenty-fifth anniversary of Ordina- 
tion of Fathers' Gerard, C.P., Mark, 
C.P., and Urban, C.P. was held on 
December 22nd. The three Jubilari- 
ans were the ministers of the Solemn 
High Mass of Thanksgiving. Father 
Roland, C.P., preached an eloquent 



194 



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sermon, paying tribute to the three 
'prospectors of God' who for twenty- 
five years have labored in the field of 
the Lord, making available to men the 
rich gold of God's grace. Father 
Malachy, C.P., enroute from Des 
Moines to Cincinnati for the celebra- 
tion of his twenty-fifth anniversary 
was present. The Clergy of the 
Archdiocese of Detroit were well 
represented. And many friends of the 
Jubilarians were also present. After 
the Solemn High Mass a Breakfast 
for 117 people was served. 

A welcomed guest for a few days 
was Father Christopher Berlo C.P., 
of the province of St. Paul of the 
Cross. Father Christopher is a chap- 
lain in the Army and is now stationed 
at the Percy Jones Army Hospital at 
Battle Creek, Michigan. He is well 
remembered by the Brethren as the 
travelling companion of the Very Rev. 
Father Titus, C.P., when the latter 
made his visitation of the Province as 
General. The Very Rev. Father 
Valentine, C.P., Rector of Holy Cross 
Monastery, Cincinnati, paid us a short 
visit. He was in Detroit to give a 
Mission with our Father Roland at St. 
Catherine's Church. Father George, 
C.P., also visited the Brethren here, 
spending a day with the Community. 

Among his other achievements Fa- 
ther Justin, C.P., now numbers the 
possession of a Low Pressure Boiler 
Operator's License for the City of 
Detroit. A City Ordinance requires 
that the one in charge of a boiler be 
a Licensed Operator and due to the 
fact that we have but two Brothers, 
it was necessary to draft Father Jus- 
tin. Father passed the examination 
for the license most creditably. And 



now under the personal supervision of 
the 'Chief, Vincent Lobaugh, ouri 
hired man, keeps the Monastery warm 
and pleasant. 

Great credit is due to Brother l 
Aloysius, C.P. and Brother Gilbert, 
C.P., for the efficient manner in which 
they take care of the laymen who 
make the week-end retreats. Their 
efforts have rendered no small part in 
the success of the Retreat Movement 
here in Detroit. 

Our Father Fabian, now in Kalis- 
pell, Montana, as hospital Chaplain, 
writes enthusiastically about his work 
there. Last • Fall he was pensioned 
from his work in Northville, Michigan. 
The work in his new position is not 
as heavy as in Northville and he 
promises to give us a pen-picture some 
time. 

The week-end Retreats for Laymen 
here at the Monastery were resumed 
for the year of 1949 on the week-end 
of January 14-16 with a group of 21 
men from the parish of Christ the 
Good Shepherd in Lincoln Park, a new 
parish. It was very encouraging to 
see the interest manifested by the Pas- 
tor of this Group. Such interest on 
the part of the pastors has been uni- 
formly good. We are happy to report 
that the Retreatants themselves, to a 
man, express a like interest. If you 
will excuse a note of optimism, we 
think that, perhaps, interest is too 
mild a word. The men are enthusias- 
tic about the retreats. We attribute 
that general feeling to these factors: 
the very excellent conferences given 
by the Retreat Master, Fr. Bartholo- 
mew; the individual attention given 
to the men by the Fathers of the Com- 
munity who visit the Retreatants in 



196 



* 




Lay Retreats at St. Paul of the Cross Monastery, Detroit are progress.ng 
;„th«slastica.ly. (Above) View of the Choir Altar and Cruc.fix. (Below) 
Retreatants photographed during tV.e recitation of the Rosary. 







Organization Meeting, Holy Name Retreat League, 
Houston, Texas, at the Sam Houston Hotel, Jan. 18, 
1949. Left to right: William Gorman, Secretary; 
Harry Pfpiffer, North-side Vice-President; Tom 
Reilly, 2nd Vice-President; Anthony Lucia; Rev. 
Conleth Overman, C.P., Retreat Director; Rev. Fr. 
Aloysius Dowling, C.P., Superior of the Houston 
Retreat; Vincent Lucia, West-Side Vice-President; 
Bernard Johnson, South-Side Vice-President: Leigh- 
ton Young, Treasurer; J. B. Earthmaan, Downtown 
Vice-President. (President and 1st Vice President 
yet to be selected.) 



weekly conference has been published 
in the "Southern Messenger". The 
money drive, suggested by Most 
Reverend Bishop Byrne last August, 
has not been able to materialize on 
account of so many other demands on 
time. Fr. Conleth says just now the 
drive consists in Prayer and Publicity 
and puts his big trust in the ancient 
C.P. tradition that money is to come 
in through the choir windows. 

Top news of our Laymen's Retreat 
Movement in Houston was made on 
January 18, when the Holy Name Re- 
treat League of the Diocese of Hous- 
ton was inaugurated. Most Reverend 
Bishop Byrne sent a most gracious 
and encouraging letter to the meeting. 
In the course of the meeting a Second 

200 



Vice President, Secretary and Treas- 
urer were appointed, the offices of 
President and First Vice President 
were left open for the time being. 
However, the several Executive Vice- 
Presidents were chosen, whose duty it 
is to look after the interests of the 
Retreat Movement in the respective 
section of the city to which they are 
appointed. Eventually each parish is 
to have a Retreat Captain. What we 
would call the Provincial or General 
Curia is called the "Steering Com- 
mittee." Another new venture in this 
connection is the Retreat Evening. 
The idea of Retreat Evenings has been 
tried out in other cities and found 
to be successful. Every month three 
men from each parish in the retreat 



istrict meet at the home of one of the 
lembers of the group. There is a 
alk by the Reverend Moderator, a dis- 
cission by the men on some point of 
latholic Dogma or practice and com- 
lon prayer; Compline is the prayer 
ecited. A very brief business session 
3 tacked on, at which the Executive 
/"ice-President of the district pre- 
ides. So far seven of these Retreat 
Cvenings are set up. Besides all this 
Recollection days for 23 Parishes of 



the city have beon scheduled for 1940. 
This is an excellent number since the 
latest Catholic Directory lists only 24 
parishes in the city of Houston. Also 
3 days of recollection have been ar- 
ranged for the Pastors of the city and 
as many for the Assistants during 
February, March and April. 



The "Laymen's Retreat News", 
niversary edition also devotes a 
page to "Matters Passionistic". 



an- 
full 



PASSIONIST NUNS 



LADY OF SORROWS 
CONVENT 

(Pittsburgh) 

Increase is always the biggest sign 
Df life and thus we are glad to know 
that on February 27th, the anniversa- 
ry of the death of St. Gabriel of the 
Sorrowful Virgin, Consorella Mary 
Joseph of the Blessed Sacrament pro- 
nounced her temporary vows as a 
Passionist Nun. May St. Gabriel and 
all the other Passionist Saints in 
heaven and here below assist her to 
persevere in her grand calling. 



o'clock he read the Second Mass and 
the Third Mass was sung followed by 
Benediction. To the joy of every one, 
we were able to bring Mother Ann to 
the choir for the eight o'clock Mass, 
so we were all present corporally as 
well as spiritually. Mother is gaining 
strength and we are hopeful that God 
is going to let us keep her. 



ST. GABRIEL RETREAT 

(Scranton) 

During Advent it was the privilege 
of our vestment department to make 
a "ternarium" and cope for the new 
church of Our Mother of Mercy in 
Washington, N. C. As usual there 
were many orders but God arranged 
everything so that by Christmas Eve 
we were able to give ourselves fully 
to the contemplation of the Magnum 
My8terium. Father Ambrose sang 
Midnight Mass for us. At eight 



Christmas letters from Europe 
brought us the news that at Thielt 
with five new Postulants their number 
in the Community is fifty, so they are 
praying most earnestly for the reali- 




PaflSionist Nuns' Retreat at Ripa 
Transom*. Italy. 

201 




Three views taken at Mt. St. Jo- 
seph Convent of the Passionist 
Sisters, at Bristol, R.I. (Upper 
right) The statue of St. Joseph, 
standing at the entrance of the 
Convent. (Left) The cottage on 
the property which accommodates 
the extra Sisters, when they come 
for Retreat or vacation. In the 
background can be seen the Mount 
Hope Bridge. (Bottom right) The 
altar in the Convent Chapel. 




treat House with an enrollment of 
twenty little pupils, five of whom are 
non-Catholics. 

Among other donations, a large out- 
door Crucifix and out-door Stations of 
the Cross have been given to the Re- 



treat and will be canonically erected 
next spring. 

A new illustrated folder is now 7 i: 
the hands of the printer and will bi 
ready for circulation in a short time 




204 




na 



In the course of the processes in 
reparation for the Beatification of 
blessed Maria Goretti it was found 
hat she never learned how to write. 
She nevertheless wrote a bigger page 
n history than most other authors. 

There are several pamphlet biogra- 
)hies of Bl. Mary Goretti in Italian. 
To our knowledge there is only one in 
English ; we have heard rumors of two 
aeing prepared at present. 



The Boston Pilot, in its vocational 
column, December 25th, had the fol- 
lowing: "I am very happy to bring my 
readers' attention to an excellent new 
pamphlet on vocation which is just 
about the most satisfactory publica- 
tion of its kind that I have ever seen. 
It is called 'Have you Heard Christ's 
Call?', and is compiled by Fr. Godfrey 
Poage, C.P. In the brief space of 
thirty pages it succeeds in conveying 
an appreciation of the ideal of voca- 
tion, and answering many of the ques- 
tions that occur to any youngster. It 
is published by the Catholic Informa- 
tion Society, 214 West 31st Street, 
New York 1, N.Y., and sells for only 
25 cents. 



"The Grail", St. Meinrad, Indiana 
now has the distribution of Fr. God- 
frey's "Follow Me" and "Follow 
Him". The latest reprint of these 




$ 



vocational pamphlets has appeared 
with colored covers. 

Not too long ago another vocational 
pamphlet was issued in St. Louis, en- 
titled "The Passionists". It is a simple 
and short history of our founding and 
what our lives and ideals should be. 



Father Victor J. Donovan, C.P., St. 
Paul of the Cross Province, received a 
half page in the Tablet of December 
11th, for his review of Fr. Oestereich- 
er's. "The Apostolate to the Jews". 
The article reminds us of our duty to 
the once chosen race, the blood-rela- 
tives of our Lord, and tells us that one 
fine step to get the necessary knowl- 
edge how we might fulfill this obliga- 
tion, is the study of "The Apostolate 
to the Jews", published by the Ameri- 
ca Press, 70 East 45th Street, New 
York, 17. Price $4.50, postage in- 
cluded. 



In the Homiletic and Pastoral Re- 
view for January, 1949, we find the 
following articles by Passionists: 
"Elsewhere for God" by Father God- 
frey J. Reilly, C.P., and u Cana (it the 
Grassroots" by Father Conleth, C.P. 

"Elsewhere for Goo?' is a zealous 
article on the problem of providing a 
Christian education for deaf children. 
Three points are made: first, the 

206 



healthy, normal humanness of a deaf 
child, except for his inability to hear; 
secondly, his mental and emotional 
handicaps which necessitate special 
education— education that cannot and 
will not be provided in ordinary 
Catholic Schools; thirdly, the lack of 
specialized Catholic Schools for giving 
these children the Christian education 
that alone can save them for Christ. 
Only eight such schools are open to 
our hundreds of deaf children. In 
conclusion, Father Godfrey pleads for 
a practical answer to this pressing 
need. 

"Cana at the Grassroots" — By way 
of prelude to this digest we remind 
our readers that "Cana" or "The Cana 
Movement" is an apostolate for the in- 
struction and sanctification of married 
couples. In other words, "Cana" aims 
at saving the family. This article 
makes an urgent appeal for organiza- 
tion of parishes on family lines, and a 
utilization of the natural interest of 
parishioners in their families. It is 
pointed out that this organization is 
necessary if interest in the "Cana" 
movement is to survive, and it must 
somehow be on parish lines since the 
parish is the basic unit of Christian 
living. However — and this is im- 
portant — the organization must not be 
"just another" parish society, the kind 
to which the good and fervent parish- 
oners belong. Rather it must be an 
organization that gets "down to the 
grassroots — down to the level where 
the family lives, down to those fami- 
lies which need Christian ideals des- 
perately, and which just as desperate- 
ly resist any effort to be drawn into a 
parish organization." The solution 
offered is the cell technique of Catho- 

206 



lie Action working in families, aril 
then, aglow with an apostolic love fdf 
Christian ideals, spreading to othq a 
families of the parish. We might ca 31 
it "The Family Apostolate"— (th jl 
family saving itself by itself.) Th 
article ends on a practical note, wit 
a plan for conducting a Cana meeting 
and other suggestions. It is an articl I, 
that will be appreciated by anyon tl 
who loves the home and family. 



Father Matthew, Director in Da 
Moines, is launching out on a projec 
that should prove most useful ana 
interesting, both historically an( 
otherwise. With the approval of oul 
highest Superiors he is collecting ano 
translating into our own tongue all 
the Circular Letters that oui 
Generals, starting with St. Paul of thd 
Cross, have addressed to the whold 
Congregation. We think that Father 
will gladly accept any help in this 
great work, since many of the letters 
are in Italian and and translating is 
tedious and it is an art to dress it in 
readable English. 



We have all reason to expect to seei 
Fr. Raphael's "Challenge of Fatima' 
in print within a short time. Fathen 
has worked long and hard at it. It 
has been on a good trial by having it! 
read to the Lay Retreatants in Holy. 
Cross Retreat House, Cincinnati. One 
feature that is very new in the worki 
is the presentation of a picture of the 
statue that Lucia herself approved as 
being most close to the apparition of 
the Blessed Mother. 



If you have to preach on Our Lady 
of Fatima and her message you will 



nd a veritable treasure-trove in 
Fatima Week Sermons at St. Mein- 
ad, Indiana", published by The Grail 
)ffice, St. Meinrad, Indiana. Price 
1.00. 



Most Reverend Bishop Bennett, 
)rdinary of the Diocese of Lafayette, 
ndiana, ordered an Imperata for all 
he members of the Society of the 
'recious Blood in his Diocese to ob- 
;ain the speedy Canonization of 
Blessed Gaspar del Bufalo, the 
"ounder of the Society. The Oratio is 
;aken from the Mass De Passione 
Domini. 



Our Ordo has a mistake on Decem- 
oer 31st in designating the letter of 
the Martyrology. Capital P is given, 
whereas small 1 is the letter for 1950. 



A few months ago the Province of 
St. Paul of the Cross issued a new 
catalogue of its members. The first 
part contains a complete enumeration 
of all the Retreats, Parishes and other 
foundations of the Province, including 
the Passionist Nuns and Sisters. Then 
follows the list of living Priests and 
Clerics of the Province with a sort of 
appendix of the names of Fathers 
from other Provinces (S. Michael and 
Holy Cross) who are serving the Pro- 
vince in China. After that the living 
Brothers are given. The list of de- 
ceased Fathers, Clerics and Brothers 
are then given. A new feature, mod- 
eled after our General Catalogue, is 
an alphabetical Index of both religious 
and family names of both Fathers and 
Clerics as well as Brothers still among 
the living. 



Tasks in the Kingdom 

"Any man who (having been called to promote Christ's kingdom) 
is unwilling to work, is unworthy of the kingdom of God. We are to 
carry on the Master's business even though He would be, as it were 
away from us. That is why the kingdom of God was left an unfinished 
task True enough, redemption was complete at the moment of Christ s 
defiant cry: "It is consummated!"— but promotion, extension, application 
have been left to us, the stewards of the manifold grace of God. 

(Sermon of Fr. Emmanuel at Missionary Conference, 

July SI, 1945) 



Sermons and Sermons 

"This work of ours is accomplished mainly by preaching the word 
of God.... Sermons, Brethren! Can we be called hard workers? How 
easily are the old ones preached, how hardly are the new ones written! 
How many of us are guilty of 'just playing around?', of trying to put 
round pegs into square holes, or vice versa?" 

(From same sermon, 08 above.) 

207 



WORKS OF MINISTRY 

(The following enumeration does not pretend to be complete, but all is recorded that has com, 
to our notice and has not been published in a former issue of THE PASSIONIST). 



Nov. 14-21 
Nov. 28-Dec. 5 
Dec. 5-12 
Dec. 12-19 



Jan. 9-16 
Jan. 16-23 



Jan. 23-30 
Jan. 23, Feb. 6 



Jan. 30-Feb. 6 
Feb. 13-27 



Feb. 20-27 
Feb. 20-March 6 
March 2-13 
March 6-13 



March 6-20 



Chandler, Ariz. 
Reedly, Calif. 
Reedly, Calif. 
Reedly, Calif. 
Liberty, Texas 
Chicago, 111. 
Catalina Island, Calif 
Independencia, Calif. 
Vincennes, Ind. 
Garden Grove, Calif. 
Westminster, Calif. 
Detroit, Mich. 

Tyler, Texas 
Conroe, Texas 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Louisville, Ky. 
Boonville, Mo. 

St. Anthony, Ind. 
Isle Breville, La. 
Alexandria, La. 
La Grange, Texas 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Dallas, Texas 

Blissfield, Mich. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Wea, Kansas 
Peterson, 111. 
Millwood, Mo. 
Hillsboro, Texas 
Hot Springs, Ark. 
Chicago, 111. 
Napoleon, Ind. 
Kansas City, Mo.. 

Barnerton, Ohio 
Detroit, Mich. 
Amherstburg, Ont. 

Allen Park, 111. 



MISSIONS 

St. Mary 

St. Anthony Hi 

St. Anthony Spanish 

St. Anthony English 

Immaculate Conception 

Sacred Heart 

St. Catharine 

Sacred Heart (Spanish) 

St. Vincent de Paul 

Bl. Sacrament 
St. Catharine 

Immaculate Concept. 

Sacred Heart 

St. Mary Magdalene 

St. Denis 

Sts. Peter & Paul 

St. Anthony 
St. Augustine 
St. Rita 
Sacred Heart 
St. Bridget 

Cathedral 

St.. Peter 

Assumption 

Holy Rosary 

Sts. Peter & Paul 

St. Alphonsus 

Lady of Mercy 

St. Mary of the Springs 

S. Maria Incoronata 

St. Maurice 

Assumption 

Sts. Cyril & Methodius 
St. Gemma 
St. John 

St. Frances Cabrini 



Galva, 111. St.. John 

Chippewa Falls, Wis. Notre Dame 



Lafayette, La. 



St. Paul 



Fr. Edward 

Fr. Edward 

Fr. Edward 

Fr. Edward 

Fr. Emmanuel 

Fr. Leo Patrick 

Fr. Jerome 

Fr. Edward 

Fr. Emmanuel 

Fr. Edward 

Fr. Edward 

Frs. Valentine & 
Roland 

Fr. Emmanuel 

Fr. Emmanuel 

Frs. Boniface & 
Walter 

Fr. Arnold 

Frs. Kilian & 
Godfrey 

Fr. Paschal 

Fr. Cornelius 

Fr. Hilary 

Fr. John Aelred 

Frs. Canute & 
Ron an 

Frs. Stanislaus & 
Bert rand 

Fr. Fidel is 

Fr. Gilbert 

Fr. Terrence 

Fr. Henry 

Fr. Walter 

Fr. Aelred 
Fr. Daniel 
Fr. Arnold 
Fr. Marion 
Frs. Robert F. & 

Paschal 
Fr. Cyril Jab. 
Fr. Roland 
Frs. Boniface & 

Flannon 
Frs. Valentine & 

Leo Patrick 
Fr. Cornelius 
Frs. Matthias & 

Godfrey 
Fr. Gregory 



208 



arch 


6-27 


Chicago, 111. 


Lady of Sorrows 




Frs. .Justin. 
Emmanuel & 
Nilus 






New Orleans, La. 


Corpus Christi 




Frs. George ft 
Kilian 


arch 


13-20 


Ennis, Texas 


St. John Nepomuk 


Fr. John A( [red 






Cincinnati, Ohio 


St. Michael 




Ft. Timothy 


arch 


13-27 


Alexandria, La. 


Lady of Prompt 


Succor 


Fr. Hilary 


arch 


20-27 


Hutchinson, Minn. 


St. Anastasia 




Vv. Terrence 






Kansas City, Mo. 


St. John Baptist 




Fr. Howard 






Morris, Ind. 


St. Anthony 




Fr. Fidelis 






Enochsburg, Ind. 


St. John 




Fr. Gilbert 






Chicago, 111. 


Nativity BMV. 




Fr. Ronan 






Chicago, 111. 


St. Michael 




Fr. Walter 






Winnsboro, La. 


St. Mary 




Fr. Ralph 






Corydon, Ind. 


St. Joseph 




Fr. Thomas 






Mansura, La. 


Lady of Prompt 


Succor 


Fr. Cornelius 


(arch 


20-April 


3 St. Paul, Minn. 


St. Mark 




Frs. Arnold & 
Paschal 


arch 


27-April 


3 Chicago, 111. 


St. Pancratius 




Fr. Boniface 


arch 


27-April 


10 Monmouth, 111. 


Immaculate Conception 


Fr. Canute 






Groves, Texas 


Immaculate Conception 


Fr. Bertrand 






Kansas City, Mo. 


Holy Spirit 




Fr. Henry 






Houston, Texas 


Sacred Heart 




Fr. John Aelred 






Evergreen, La. 


Little Flower 




Fr. Cornelius 






Chicago, 111. 


Holy Rosary 




Fr. Harold 






Brenham, Texas 


St. Mary 




Fr. Kilian 


larch 


27-April 


10 Chicago, 111. 


St.. Lawrence 




Frs. Timothy & 
Flannon 






Hopkins, Minn. 


St. Joseph 




Fr. Julius 






Youngstown, O. 


St. Patrick 




Frs. Martin, Daniel 
& Theophane 






Evanston, 111. 


St. Athanasius 




Frs. Roland & Leo 
Patrick 






Windsor, Ontario 


Sacred Heart 




Frs. Gregory & 
Marion 






Cincinnati, O. 


Assumption 




Frs. Valentine & 

Robert F. 






Cleveland, O. 


Our Lady of Me 


cy 


Fr. Cyril 


\pril 


3-10 


Cicero, 111. 


St. Callistus 




Fr. Ronan 






Henderson, Minn. 


St. Joseph 




Fr. Terrence 






Edna, Texas 


St. Agnes 




Fr. Stanislaus 






Bossier City, La. 


Christ the King 




Fr. Hilary 






Lafayette, La. 


Southwestern La 


. Institute 


Fr. Emmanut 1 






Painesville, O. 


St. Mary 




Fr. Gilbert 






Cicero, 111. 


St. Anthony 




Fr. Jeremiad 






Edtfevvood, Iowa 


St. Mark 




Fr. George 






Melrose Park, 111. 


Lady of Mt. Cannd 


Fr. Justin 






Birmingham, Ala. 


St. Paul 




Frs. Ralph A 

Cornelius 






Louisville, Ky. 


St. Paul 




Fr. Thomas 






Fort Sill, Okla. 


Post Chapel 




Fr. Brendan 






Anoka, Minn. 


St. Stephen 




FT. Arnold 


April 


24-May 


1 Port Arthur, Texas 
Marion. Iowa 


St. Janus 
St. Joseph 




Fr. lMiimanucI 

iy. Ronan 



2(19 



April 24-May 8 



Nov. 29-Dec. 8 
Dec. 1-8 
Dec. 11-17 
Dec. 28-Jan. 1 



Oldenburg, Ind. St. Ann 

Windsor, Canada St. Angela Merici 

St.. Louis, Mo. St. Stanislaus 

Marksville, La. Holy Ghost 



Dec. 28-Jan. 1 



Jan. 2-9 



Jan. 16-20 

Jan. 16-23 

Jan. 24-28 

Jan. 30- Feb. 3 

Jan. .'SO-Feb. 4 

Jan. 81-Feb. 1 

Feb. 6-13 



RETREATS TO 

Cincinnati, O. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
La Porte, Texas 
Hutchenson, Kansas 
Iowa City, Iowa 
Chicago, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 
Des Plaines, 111. 
Joplin, Mo. 
Independence, Ks. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Dayton, Ohio 
Des Moines, Iowa 
Council Bluffs, Iowa 
Des Moines, Iowa 
Columbus, Ohio 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Ensley, Ala. 
Council Bluffs, Iowa 
Muskegon, Mich. 
Battle Creek, Mich. 

Frontenac, Minn. 
Webster Groves, Mo. 
Sioux City, Iowa 
Marshaltown, Iowa 
Centerville, Iowa 
Fort Smith, Ark. 
Des Moines, Iowa 
Ft. Dodge, Iowa 
Cincinnati, O. 
Waverly, Iowa 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Dallas, Texas 
Cincinnati, O. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Siena Madre. Calif. 
Sacramento, Calif. 
Wichita, Kansas 
Cincinnati, O. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
St. Meinrad, Ind. 
St. Meinrad, Ind. 
St. Meinrad, Ind. 
Pittsburgh. Pa. 
Union City, N.J. 



CLERICS AND RELIGIOUS 

Little Sisters of Poor 

Alexian Brothers 

St. Mary Major Sem. 

St. Elisabeth Hospital 

Mercy Hospital 

Mercy High 

St. Ann Convent 

St. Mary of the Lake 

St.. Joachim 

St. Patrick 

St. Peter's 

Mercy Sisters 

St. Catharine Convent 

St. Elisabeth Hosp. 

St. Catharine Hall 

Mt. Loretto 

Bishop Drumm Home 

Sisters of Mercy 

Our Lady of Sorrows 

St. Anthony 

St. Bernard Hosp. 

Mercy Hospital 

Leilia Y. Post 

Montgomery Hospital 
Villa Maria Acad. 
St. Jos. Conv. of Mercy 
St. Jos. Mercy Hosp. 
Mercy Hospital 
Mercy Hospital 
St. Ann's Acad. 
Mercy Hospital 
St. Jos. Mercy Hosp. 
Mercy Sisters 
Mercy Hospital 
Ursuline Sisters 
Ursuline Nuns 
Holy Cross Retreat 
St. Paul Retreat 
Mater Dolorosa Retreat 
Christ the King Retreat 
Sisters of St. Joseph 
Brothers of H. Infancy 
Retreat C.P. 
C.P. Seminarians 
Major Seminary 
Religious 
Minor Seminary 
C.P. Monastery 
C.P. Monastery 



Fr. Valentine 
Fr. Roland 
Fr. Hilary 
Fr. Cornelius 



Fr. Joyce 
Fr. Stanislaus 
Fr. Paschal 
Fr. Egbert 
Fr. Ronan 
Fr. Gilbert 
Fr. Benet 
Fr. Arnold 
Fr. Elmer 
Fr. Alfred 
Fr. Brendan 
Fr. Henry 
Fr. Thomas 
Fr. Joyce 
Fr. Howard 
Fr. Ernest 
Fr. James 
Fr. Fidelis 
Fr. Cornelius 
Fr. Terrence 
Fr. Kevin 
Fr. Alexis 

Fr. Justin 
Fr. Louis 
Fr. Anthony 
Fr. Agatho 
Fr. Conell 
Fr. Hilary 
Fr. George 
Bernard Br. 
Fr. Marion 
Fr. Edwin 
Fr. Paschal 
Fr. Louis 
Fr. Charles G. 
Fr. Matthias 
Fr. Kenneth 
Fr. Roland 
Fr. Roland 
Fr. Stanislaus 
Fr. Joyce 
Fr. Daniel 
Fr. Canute 
Fr. Matthias 
Fr. Paschal 
Fr. Cyril Jab. 
Fr. Anthony 
Fr. Thomas 



210 



b. 22-March 1 
irch 2-11 
arch 3-12 
rch 12-19 
arch 16-25 



ch 26-April 2 
pril 8-17 
pril 19-26 
pril 21-30 
pril 26-May 1 



6-9 

7-9 

10-12 

15-19 

17-19 

29-31 

1-3 

3-6 

7-9 

14-16 

17-21 

18-21 

. 18-22 

. 19-21 

, 21-23 

. 24-28 

. 25-28 
. 26-28 



Ian. :'»()- Feb. 4 
Ian. :U-Feb. 2 
Feb. 1-8 
Feb. 2-4 
Feb. 7-9 
Feb. 11-13 



ErlanKcr, Ky. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
W. Springfield, Mass. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Owensboro, Ky. 
Council Bluffs, Iowa 
Des Plaines, 111. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Louisville, Ky. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
San Antonio, Texas 
Cincinnati, O. 
Colo. Springs, Colo. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
D'avenport, Iowa 
St. Paul, Minn. 



C.P. Nuns 

C.P. Nuns 

C.P. Monastery 

C.P. Monastery 

C.P. Nuns 

Sisters of Mercy 

Sisters of Mercy 

Sisters of Sor. Mother 

Srs. of Nazareth 

Srs. of Incarnate Word 

Srs. Incarnate Word 

Srs. of Poor of St. Francis 

Sisters of Charity 

St. Mary Hospital 

Sisters of Mercy 

St. Joseph Infirmary 



Evansville, Ind. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Toledo, Ohio 
Duluth, Minn. 
Cleveland, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Lexington, Ky. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Bardstown, Ky. 
Ft. Dodge, Iowa 
Iowa City, Iowa 
Toledo, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Fresno, Calif. 

Donaldson, Ind. 
San Diego, Calif. 
Cincinnati, O. 
LaG range, 111. 

Cincinnati, O. 
San Diego, Calif. 
Winona, Minn. 



LAY RETREATS 

St. Mary Hospital 

Holy Cross Monastery 

St. Vincent Hospital 

St. Scholastica College 

Convent of Good Shepherd 

Good Samaritan Nurses 

St. Vincent de Paul Soc. 

Holy Cross Monastery 

St. Joseph Hospital 

Holy Cross Monastery 

St. Joseph's High 

St. Jos. Mercy Hospital 

Mercy Nurses 

St. Vincent Hospital 

Holy Cross Monastery 

Seton High 

San Joanquin Hi 

Aspirants, Ancilla Dni. 
Cathedral Hi 
Holy Cross Monastery 
Nazareth Academy 

St. Joseph Academy 

Rosary Hi 

St. Mary College 



Des Moines, Iowa 
Alhambra, Calif. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Green Bay, Wis. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Nazareth, Mich. 
Hollywood, Calif. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Toledo, 0. 
Alhambra, Calif. 



Mercy Nurses 
S. Heart Retreat House 
Holy Cross Monastery 
St. Joseph Academy 
Immaculata Hi 
Military Academy 
Immac. Heart College 

Notre Dame Hi 

St. Vincent Hospital 

S. Heart Retreat Hoii-e 



Fr. Brendan 
Fr. Louis 
Fr. Thomas 
Fr. Anthony 
Fr. Mark 
Fr. Joyce 
Fr. Louis 
Fr. Alexis 
Fr. Anthony 
I'i. Kevin 
Fr. Egbert 
Vr. .Joyce 
Fr. Anthony 
Fr. Bernard B. 
Fr. Boniface 
Fr. Bernard B. 



Fr. Roland 
Fr. Edwin 
Fr. Cyril 
Fr. Emmanuel 
Fr. Anthony 
Fr. Valentine 
Fr. Charles G. 
Fr. Edwin 
Fr. Anthony 
Fr. Edwin 
Fr. Emmanuel 
Fr. Marion 
Fr. Ronan 
Fr. Cyril 
Fr. Edwin 
Fr. Anthony 
Frs. Philip & 

Dunstan 
Fr. Howard 
Fr. Jerome 

Fr. Edwin 

Frs. Matthew A 
Henry 

Fr. Anthony 

Fr. Jerome 

Frs. Boniface & 
Stephen 

I'i . Ronan 

Vv. Roderick 

Fr. Edwin 

Fr. Godfrey 

Fr. Carl 

Fr. Stephen 
Fr, Jerome 

Fr. Valentine 

Fr. Cyril Jab. 
Fr. Jerome 



211 



Feb. 26-28 


Council Bluffs, Iowa 


Mount Loretto 


Fr. Joyce 


March 2-4 


Mankato, Minn. 


Good Counsel Acad. 


Fr. Martin 


March 8-11 


Louisville, Ky. 


Mercy Academy 


Frs. Thomas &• 
Vincent Mary 


March 10-13 


Cullman, Ala. 


Sacred Heart Academy 


Fr. Ralph 


March 15-17 


Detroit, Mich. 


Holy Rosary High 


Fr. Matthew 


March 21-23 


Detroit, Mich. 


Our Lady of Mercy 


Frs. Matthew & 
Henry 


March 24-April 1 


Louisville, Ky. 


St. Xavier High 


Fr. Godfrey 


April 3-10 


Sleepy Eye, Minn. 


Lady Help of Christ. 


Fr. Fidel is 


April 10-13 


Detroit, Mich. 


Dominican High 


Fr. Howard 


April 10-17 


Cincinnati, O. 


Good Sam. Hosp. 


Fr. Edwin 




Dearborn, Mich. 


St. Alphonsus Parish 


Fr. Boniface 


April 11-13 


Louisville, Ky. 


Flaget Hi. 


Fr. Godfrey 


April 22-24 


Colo. Springs, Colo. 


El Pomar 


Fr. Anthony 


April 30-May 4 


Chicago, 111. 


Little Sisters of Poor 

NOVENAS 


Fr. Kevin 


Oct. 24-Dec. 19 








(9 Sundays) 


Cincinnati, O. 


Holy Trinity 


Fr. Quentin 


Dec. 14-23 


New Orleans, La. 


Incarnate Word 


Fr. Bertrand 


Feb. 2-11 


Altadena, Calif. 


St. Elisabeth 


Fr. Philip 


March 10-19 


Summit, 111. 


St. Joseph 


Fr. Norbert 


March 16-25 


New Orleans, La. 


Incarnate Word 


Fr. Conell 


April 6-14 


Howell, Mich. 


St. Joseph 

TRIDUUMS 


Fr. Norbert 


April 1-3 


Hazel Park, Mich. 


St. Mary Magdalene 


Fr. Norbert 




FORTY HOURS 




Dec. 10-12 


St. Louis, Mo. 


St. Engelbert 


Fr. James 


Jan. 9-11 


Pasadena, Calif. 


St. Philip 


Fr. Roderick 




Louisville, Ky. 


St. Martin 


Fr. Flannon 


Jan. 23-25 


Sierra Madre, Calif. 


St. Rita 


Fr. Dunstan 


Jan. 30-Feb. 1 


Westminster, Calif. 


Bl. Sacrament 


Fr. Edward 




San Diego, Calif. 


Sacred Heart 


Fr. Jerome 


Feb. 11-13 


Altadena, Calif. 


St. Elisabeth 


Fr. Philip 


Feb. 13-15 


Louisville, Ky. 


St. Leo 


Fr. Gilbert 




Beuchel, Ky. 


St. Bartholomew 


Fr. Marion 


Feb. 27-March 1 


Henderson, Ky. 


Holy Name 


Fr. Gilbert 




DAYS OF RECOLLECTION 




Nov. 30 


Independence, Ky. 


Diocesan Clergy 


Fr. Charles 


Dec. 7 


Middletown, O. 


Holy Trinity Hi 


Fr. Charles 


Dec. 15 


Sierra Madre, Calif. 


Diocesan Clergy 


Fr. Damian 


Dec. 30 


Dayton, O. 


St. Julien's Hi. 


Fr. Valentine 


Dec. 81 


Duarte, Calif. 


S. Teresita Sanit. 


Fr. Jerome 




Cincinnati, O. 


Madames of S. Heart 


Fr. Quentin 




Cincinnati, O. 


Ursuline Academy 


Fr. Valentine 


Jan. 19 


Sierra Madre, Calif. 


Diocesan Clergy 


Fr. Damian 


Jan. 27 


St. John, Ky. 


Bethlehem Academy 


Fr. Austin 


Feb. 1 


Alton. 111. 


Clergy 


Fr. Hilary 


Feb. 3 


Duarte, Calif. 


Spanish Sisters 


Fr. Alfred Mc 


Feb. 4 


Alhambra, Calif. 


Spanish Sisters 


Fr. Alfred Mc 


Feb. 16 


Sierra Madre, Calif. 


Diocesan Clergy 


Fr. Damian 



212 



Louisville, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 



Sacred Heart Academy 
Nazareth Acad. Alum. 



Fr. Julius 

Fr. Vincent Mary 



CONFERENCES TO SISTERS 



Cincinnati, 0. 


Holy Cross & Immaculata 


Fr. 


Charles 


Ft. Thomas, Ky. 


Good Shepherds 


Fr. 


Valentine 


Cincinnati, 0. 


Dominican Cloistered Nuns 


Fr. 


Valentine 


Cincinnati, O. 


S. Jos. Orphanage Sisters 


Fr. 


Bernard B. 


Cincinnati, O. 


Seton Hi Sisters 


Fr. 


Quentin 


Hartwell, 0. 


Srs. of the P. of St. Francis 


Fr. 


Valentine 


Cincinnati, 0. 


St. Jos. Infant Home Srs. 


Fr. 


Bernard B. 


Cincinnati, O. 


St. Mary Hi Srs. 


Fr. 


Quentin 


Cincinnati, O. 


Good Samaritan Srs. 


Fr. 


Sylvester 


Cincinnati, 0. 


St. Jos. Orphange Srs. 


Fr. 


Bernard B. 


Cincinnati, O. 


Seton Hi Srs. 


Fr. 


Quentin 


Cincinnati, 0. 


Madames of S. Heart 


Fr. 


Quentin 


Hartwell, O. 


Little Srs. of P. of St. Francis 


Fr. 


Valentine 


Ft. Thomas, Ky. 


Good Shepherds 


Fr. 


Valentine 


Cincinnati, 0. 


St. Jos. Infant Home Srs. 


Fr. 


Bernard B. 


Cincinnati, 0. 


Good Sam. Srs. 


Fr. 


Sylvester 


Cincinnati, O. 


St. Mary Hi Srs. 


Fr. 


Quentin 


Cincinnati, 0. 


Dominican Cloistered Nuns 


Fr. 


Valentine 


Cincinnati, O. 


H. Cross & Immaculata 


Fr. 


Charles 


Cincinnati, O. 


H. Cross & Immaculata 


Fr. 


Charles 


Cincinnati, O. 


St. Jos. Orphanage Srs. 


Fr. 


Bernard B. 


Cincinnati, 0. 


St. Mary Hi Srs. 


Fr. 


Quentin 


Cincinnati, 0. 


Seton Hi Srs. 


Fr. 


Quentin 


Cincinnati, O. 


Good Sam. Srs. 


Fr. 


Sylvester 


Cincinnati, O. 


St. Jos. Infant Home Srs. 


Fr. 


Bernard B. 


Cincinnati, 0. 


Madames of S. Heart 


Fr. 


Quentin 


Ft. Thomas, Ky. 


Good Shepherds 


Fr. 


Valentine 


Cincinnati, 0. 


Dominican Nuns 


Fr. 


Valentine 


Hartwell, 0. 


Little Srs. of Poor of St. Francis Fr. 


Valentine 


Louisville, Ky. 


Little Srs. of Poor 


Fr. 


Julius 


Louisville, Ky. 


Sacred Heart Home 


Fr. 


Julius 


Louisville, Ky. 


Mercy Academy 


Fr. 


Julius 



Louisville, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Okolona, Ky. 
St. Matthews, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Beuchel, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Louisville. Ky. 



LENTEN COURSES 

St. Michael 
St. Agnes 
St. Rita 
Holy Trinity 
St. Francis 
St. William 
St. Bartholomew 
St. Denis 
St. Paul 



Fr. Charles 

Fr. Alfred 

Fr. Gordian 

Fr. Cormac 

Fr. Hubert 

Fr. Camillus 

Fr. Camillus 

Vv. Vincent Mary 

Fr. Vincent Mary 



HOLY WEEK PREACHING 

Ft. Worth, Texas St. Patrick 



i'i . Bertrand 



213 



WHO IS WHO AND WHER 



. 



ROME 

Malcolm 1 
Roger 

CHICAGO 

James Patrick 2 

Joseph 3 

Neil 4 

Herman 5 

Kilian 7 

Cyril M 

Augustine 

David K 

J. Philip 

Vincent X 

Norbert 

Alban 

Richard 9 

Matthias 

Conrad 12 

Joseph M 13 

Alan 40 

Kenneth 

Donald 10 

Conell 18 

Howard 17 

Benet 

Barnabas Mary 19 

Paul F 10 

Wm. Gail 14 

Leo Patrick 

Paul 39 

Godfrey 

Students 

Melvin 

Emmet 

Kent 

Kenan 

Ward 

Bernardine 

Venard 

Caspar 

Benedict Joseph 

John Mary 

Peter Claver 

Luke 

Clement 

Dominic 

Brothers 

Joseph 21 



HOLY CROSS 

Leo 23 

CINCINNATI 

Valentine 5 

Colum 7 

Aurelius 

Alphonsus 

Edwin 27 

Raphael 

Bernard 

Arthur 9 

Timothy 

Sylvester 

Nicholas 15 

Claude 

Daniel 

Emmanuel 

Joyce 

Leopold 

Kenny 9 

Quentin 

Charles G. 25 

Thaddeus 10 

Carl 34 

Brothers 

Anthony 21, 22 
William 24 

LOUISVILLE 

Julius 5 

Gordian 7 

Isidore 

Adalbert 

Charles 

Lawrence 

Anselm 9 

Andrew 

Maurice 29 

Thomas 

Gilbert 39 

Hubert 42, 39 

Marion 

Camillus 41 

Austin 

Arnold 

Silvius 

Alfred 

Vincent M 16 

Cormac 10 

Flannon 

Campion 



PROVINCE, FEBRUARY, 1949 

John Bapt. Conrad 24 

Noel Regis 22, 21 

Forrest David 23 



Keith 

Raymond 

Fergus 

Deacons 

Jordan 

Owen 

Rene 

Warren 

Columban 

Alvin 

In Minor Ord. 

Carrol 

Randal 

Firmian 

Clyde 

Loran 

Simon 

Brothers 

Luke 23, 24 
Gabriel 31 
Casimir 22 
Denis 21 

ST. LOUIS 

Kyran 5 
Walter 7 
Celestine 44 
Herbert 45 
Kevin 
Edgar 45 
Ervan 45 
Anthony Mah. 
Regis 45 
Elmer 45 
Ernest 45 
Germain 45 
Cyprian 45 
James 45 
William Jos 45 
Emil 45 
Cronan 45 
Roch 39 
Leon 45 

Brothers 

James 43 
Bernard 21 



ST. PAUL 

Robert Felix 5 
Faustinus 6 
Egbert 7 
Matthew M 
Hyacinth 
Julian 
Edward 
George 
Agatho 
Christopher 9 
Brendan 
Cyprian F. 9 
Henry 
Paschal 
Miles 10 
Joel 11 

Brothers 

Louis 24 
Philip 21 
John 22, 31 
Thomas 
George 

Novices 

Francis Martin 

Carl Anthony 

Jude 

Justin Mary 

Sebastian 

Postulants 

Paul 

Charles 

DES MOINES 

Bernard Mary 5 

Canute 7 

Ignatius 

Louis 

Malachy 

Martin 

Hilary 

Paulinus 

Peter 

Jeremias 

Robert 32 



Matthew V 39 
Wilfrid 
Nathaniel 
Ignatius B 35 
Ronan 

Thomas More 3 
John 37 
Stephen 38 

Students 

Paul Mary 

Augustine Paul 

Joachim 

Bede 

Barry 

J. Francis 

Marvin 

Victor 

Gail 

Aquinas 

J. Gabriel 

Myron 

Denis 

Albert 

Eugene 

Meinrad 

Bruce 

Berchmans 

Rian 

Brothers 

Romuald 23 
Columban 22, 31 
Felix 
Theodore 21 

DETROIT 

Clarence 5 
Benet 7 
Benedict 
David Ferl 

Alexia 

Justin 

Gerald 

Linus 

Boniface 

Gerard 

Mark 

Urban 

Ferdinand 

Roland 



214 



ideJis 


Finan 10 


Ludger 


CHINA 


atriek 9 


Roderick 


Canisius 


Anthony Mai. 


heophane 


Jerome 


Mel 


William W 20 


ilus 


Isidore R 25 




Cyprian L 20 


jrril Jab 


Lucian 34 


FAIRFIELD 


James L'bt 20 


artholomew 27 


Alfred MC 


Edmund 


Francis Fl 20 


arold 


Brothers 




Harold Trav 20 


eclan 25 








rothers 


Ricbard 22 
Gerald 24 


SA'MENTO 


UNIVERSITY 


loysius 21 


Patrick 21 


Angelo 8 




ilbert 22 




Gabriel 


Gregory Jos 28 


IERRA MADRE 


BIRMINGHAM 


Pius 


Frederick 28 
Leon 


ambert 5 


Ralph 8 


HOUSTON 




unstan 7 

eginald 


Cornelius 
Gregory Mc 


Aloysius 8 


CHAPLAINS 


eo 9 


Terrence 


Stanislaus 


Fabian 


asil 


Brice 


Bert rand 


Leonard 


hilip 


Bro. Henry 83 


John Aelred 


Xavier 


idan 




Conleth 25 


Brian 


!d. Guido 


ENSLEY 


Bro. Daniel 33 


Nicholas G. 


'amian 27 


Eustace 8 







REFERENCES 



First Gen. Consultor SS. Giovanni e Paolo 24. 

Rome (147), Italy 25. 

Provincial 26 - 

I Consultor 27. 

II Consultor 28. 
Rector 29. 
Master of Novices 30. 
Vicar 31. 
Superior 32. 
Pastor 33. 
Assistant 34. 
Vice Master 35. 
Lector of Church History 36. 
Lector of I and II Dogma Passion 37. 
Chaplain at Dunning 38. 
Chaplain for Passionist Nuns 

Lector of Can. Law, Liturgy 39. 

Director of Girls' Vocational Club 40. 

Provincial Secretary 41. 

Lector of Scripture I and II 

Catholic Mission 42. 
Passionist Fathers, Yuanling, Hunan 

China 43. 

Cook 44. 

Tailor, Inftrmarian 45. 

Refectorian 



Outside Brothers 

Director of Retreatants 

in U.S.A. 

Retreat Master 

Montreal 

Lector of S. Eloquence 

Retreat Organizer 

Porter 

Lector of History 

All around Brother 

Assistant Retreat Director 

Lector of English, Phil. II. 

Lector of Phil. I ; Hist, of Phil. II 

Lector of Phil. Ill 

Lector of Hist, of Phil. I ; S. Passion ; 

Public Speaking 

Director 

Sign Fieldman 

Lector of Scripture III and IV Passion 

III and IV 

Lector of Moral. Pastoral Theol. and 

Catechel lea, Asceticism, 

Assistant Cook 

Chaplain at St. Vincent's 

Lector 



216 




yy< 7Ue PaUtiuud 



1) Office of St. Gemma 

2) Mass of St. Gemma 

3) Additiones et Variationes in Officiis Propriis Congregationis 

4) Bound Passionist Bulletin No. 19 to 28 

5) "God's own Method" by Fr. Aloysius 

6) Catechism of the Principal Duties of a Passionist Religious 

7) Regulations of the Passionist Novice 

8) Order to be observed by Choir At High or Solemn Mass 

9) "A Retreat Souvenir" by Fr. Victor, C.P., translated by Fr. 
Edmund, C.P. 

10) "THE PASSIONIST", 1948, bound. 

11) St. Gemma Galgani, by Fr. Osmund, C.P. 

12) Dominic Barbari by Fr. Osmund, C.P. 

13) The Love of Mary by D. Roberto. St. Gabriel's favorite book. 

14) Pictures of Bl. Mary Goretti. 




Toe 7 
ASS10N1ST 

JLLETINofHOLY cross province 





Vol. II 




No. 3 



MAY-JUNE, 1949 
MATER GRATIAE 



THE PASSIONIST 

Bulletin of Holy Cross Province 



Vol. II, No. 3 



May-June, 19 



Published bimonthly at the Sacred Heart Retreat, 1924 Newburg Road, Louisville 5, Ky., U.i 
Issued each January, March, May, July, September and November. Financed by free- 
offerings from readers. There is no Copyright. The paper is a private publication 
manuscripto." 



IN THIS ISSUE 



Vox Patris 217 

Celibate Love 219 

St. Paul and the Sick 226 

Thoughts on Prayer 232 

A Second Little Sister 237 

Passionist Customs 241 

Oratio A Cunctis 252 

Missionary Forum 257 

Sorrows of Mary 267 

Our Scapular 270 



Ius Particulare 

Acta Congregationis 

Provincial Curia ;i 

St. Paul Province j 

Province of Holy Cross , r 

Passionist Nuns 

Passionist Sisters i 

Varia L 

Works of Ministry 3 

Who is Who ° 



"The Passionist" aims at a deeper knowledge of the purpose of our Congregation and at 
closer attainment of said purpose. Cooperation is invited. Consequently, contributions by ai 
member of the Congregation along the lines of news, past or present, of general or provinc. 
interest; articles dogmatic, ascetical, canonical or of historical value for us, are welcome. A! 
photographs of recent or historic C.P. events are helpful towards the ideal "The Passionis 
strives to reach. Especially at present does "The Passionist" wish to establish and conduct t 
Missionary Forum. 



o 



'P 



A 



T 



R 




)AUL OF THE CROSS, Superior 
General of the Congregation of 
!.e Passion. 
2 Notification to be read on the first 

id second Sundays of Lent. 

'HE approach of our General 

Chapter strongly urges us to 

11 upon the Lord continually in 

^r poor prayers and at the altar 

that His Divine Majesty may 

ive pity on us and the whole 

nigregation. May He deign in 

is infinite mercy to pour forth 

pundant light into our hearts that 

e better be able to decide in the 

Bction of Superiors and especially 

" at of the Superior General. The 

^vernment of the entire Congre- 

:iition is entrusted to him and 

J )on him depends the good or 

did order of the regular observ- 

ice without which this spiritual 

-lifice must fall to the ground in 



\ 


I 




ft 


% * 


I 


^' 


f 



ruins. And so the most effective 
preparation to receive lights and 
graces from the Lord consists prin- 
cipally in purity of soul, profound 
humility of heart and a fervent 
perfect charity which makes one 
heart of many hearts through a 
union of holy love in God. This 
renders hearts docile, of one mind, 
peaceful in order to be well dis- 
posed to see the divine will in the 
election of Superiors. To gain this 
end which we ardently desire in 
Jesus Christ for His greater glory 
we feel bound in conscience to or- 
der the exact observance of the 
following points: 

1. We order and command in the 
name of the Lord, that no Capitular 
nemine excepto, complain and mur- 
mur among themselves about their 
troubles or other events during 
their term. No one is to reveal 

217 



anything that happened in their 
Retreats except what will give 
great edification and increase fer- 
vor and fraternal charity. In case 
there was some trouble, difficulty, 
or anything else which they wish 
to discuss for their greater peace 
of soul and to obtain advice, they 
can talk it over with the Higher 
Superiors alone. In case they do 
not think much of the General or 
cannot speak easily with him, they 
can talk to the First or Second 
General Consultor, but to no one 
else. Such conferences should be 
held with purity of intention, to 
receive light and counsel, and not 
to satisfy some passion or com- 
plaint, lest they lose the great 
treasure of merit born of suffering. 

2. We likewise command that it 
be unlawful for anyone, not only 
Capitulars but any private re- 
ligious to hold useless discourses 
about the election of Superiors, but 
in true peace, humility and charity 
let them attend to begging the 
Lord to provide us with saintly 



subjects. Conferences necessal 
for prudent and circumspect acti< 
must be held with the General ail 
his Consultors ; and when the pro 
er time comes for them, they w 
be called by Fr. Secretary. V 
exhort all by the merciful heart 
God and all the work, sufferii 
and holy death of our Saviour J 
sus Christ, to remain in true peac 
fervent charity, and union wi 
God. Attend to holy prayer, bei 
ging His Majesty to give the lig. 
necessary to choose correctly in tl 
election and in everything else co 
cerning the greater spiritual a 
vantage and increase of our po< 
Congregation. 

Given in this Retreat of Ss 
Angelo of Vetralla, this 12th dd 
of February, 1758. 

General 

Frances Anthony of the Crucifie 
Secretary 



(Ten days before the Chapter was to begin Our Holy Founder sent this "notification" to reguli 
the Capitular meetings better. It was to be read on the next two Sundays. The origii 
was in Italian.) 




218 



mgent€8 me diligo. 



(celibate Hooe 



A AN is by nature a hero wor- 
** shipper. It is noticeable in the 
lild, the adolescent, and the old. 
The Flying Fool," conceived the 
lost foolish of his daring ideas, 
lany thought, when he announced 
is intention of a solo across the 
tlantic. In some thirty hours, he 
inded in France, not the Flying 
ool but an international hero. His 
ame became a household word in 
very language. 

In spiritual, intellectual, and 
hysical endeavours, every adult 
as his ideals. Near perfection 
as been obtained by a man or 
/oman — he or she has personified 
hat ideal — success receives our 
ribute of admiration and, if with- 
i the scope of our talent, our em- 
lation — we imitate our hero. 

Every type of talent has its Im- 
lortals. In religion, science and 
rt men and women of unusual 
alent and attainment are forbid- 
len to die. They continue their 
nspiring lives in statue, painting, 
iterature, and song — their lives 
re operative centuries after they 
lave died. The disciple of admira- 
ion and emulation occasionally 
urpasses his master or hero. 

Every Passionist has a hero en- 
hrined on the altar of his heart, 
blowing love, manifested in virtu- 
>us admiration and imitation, is 



the vigil light of that shrine. Her 
name has never been blazoned a- 
cross the front page of newspapers. 
Her heroism is not the result of an 
unusual effort of an hour, a day, 
but of years. She loved, lived, 
worked, and died unconscious of 
admiring eyes. That person is his 
mother. 

The gift of motherhood deprived 
her of singleness of thought and 
action. Yes, even altered her per- 
sonality. Her life multiplied with 
the acceptance of each child. She 
could no longer feel, think, work, 
love, laugh or suffer as an individu- 
al. When her child was happy, she 
was radiantly so; when her child 
suffered, she was in anxious mental 
pain and often physical weariness. 
Apprehension was like a shadow of 
her soul, because maternal love 
would not permit her to abandon 
her child in disgrace. God forbid 
it, was her unspoken prayer. 

Her gift of motherhood was akin 
to a share in God's most pure love, 
and proportionately, a participant 
in His omnipotence. Such love 
made her omnipresent through 
spiritual solicitude and physical 
sacrifices. Our childhood is record- 
ed in human flesh. We read it in 
her toil-worn hands, the wrinkles 
on her sweet face, and the silver 
crown on her brow. 



•219 



We celebrate our birthday as 
her feast day. It is the anniversary 
of her entrance into the valley of 
probable death, where her life hung 
in the balance. She courageously 
faced death that we might see the 
light of day, for a few years, and 
then Eternal Light. Smiles, tears, 
worry, work, love and prayers fol- 
lowed through the years of our 
childhood. What a hero! The week 
of our birthday, we go without a 
free Mass, or a personal intention 
for Holy Communion, if a Brother. 
Filial love does not permit us to 
think of any other equal intention 
for our Mass, or Holy Communion, 
on that day. 

Our holy vocation to the Pas- 
sionist Congregation is a stamp of 
divine approval on her life of hero- 
ism. That is one of the reasons 
why the Church demands honora- 
ble parentage of her novices. Your 
life manifests your mother, so also, 
Christ and His Holy Mother re- 
flect each other, in so far as the 
infinite and finite can do so. 

Meditation on His divinity in- 
creases our faith to realization and 
enables us to appreciate her dig- 
nity. The greater our esteem for 
the privilege of the Mother of all 
mothers, the more shall we be im- 
pressed by the divinity of the Son, 
who demanded so much of her be- 
cause He conferred so many graces 
upon her. The divine attributes 
are reflected more appealingly in 
the immaculate femininity of the 



R 



perfect mother. The maternal cl 
pacity for suffering seems bett 
portrayed, when we study her Son 
sacred Passion and Death. She 
great because of her Son and H 
mission as Savior. The love ar 
veneration of her is personal - 
Him, her God and yours. "L< 
this mind be in you which was akl 
in Christ Jesus." (Phil. 2,6) 

He was perfect man, she tr 
perfect mother. Hence, we inft 
that Christ's chief human affectio 
was that which He felt for he 
He came to redeem mankind, s* 
obviously it was the mind of Go 
to make her a mother with an im 
maculate heart, big enough t 
mother the world. "Behold th 
mother!" The Church adds to Hi 
gift by extending to her the titl 
of Mother of Divine Grace. 

As a child of grace, your spir 
itual existence traces its maternit; 
back to the immaculate heart o 
Mary. Your baptism, Holy Com 
munion, Confirmation, profession 
and Holy Orders, all testify to th< 
motherly care of the Queen o- 
Heaven and Earth, a spiritual no 
bility, beyond the poverty of word* 
to describe. In the light of thai 
love, your natural affection foi 
your physical mother dwindles tc 
the proportion of the love of 
young brother for an older sister 

The word mother is so compre- 
hensive and extensive in meaning 
that it awes us. The words, God 
and mother, tax the inadequacy of 



220 



le most vivid imagination. Not 
> the word father. Many children 
ike him for granted. In fact, we 

call him with an affectionate 
nile, because he was just as big 

worry and nuisance to mother as 
ly one or even several of the chil- 
ren. Yes, the word father, is a 
3od contrasting word with that 
mother. He is the head of the 
puse by divine appointment but 

2 delegated most of the planning 
id worrying to his obedient and 
svoted wife. The words as well 

3 the persons compliment each 
:her. The word mother recalls a 
erennial debt of love we feel in- 
iequate to repay. The ready ac- 
jptance of our least action, by 
oth physical and spiritual moth- 
rs, when enhanced by childlike 
we rejoices the heart of the 
rawniest man. We become men in 
ad's eyes but never in mother's. 

The scholarly St. Bernard always 
snsidered himself a child in his 
elations to Our Blessed Mother. 
7e enjoy recalling his salutation : 
Ave Maria!" and her immediate 
ssponse: "Ave Bernarde!" The 
eartbeat of a devoted child vo- 
ilized in that salute. He was a 
lan's man when fighting the bat- 
es of the Church and the enemies 
f her divine Son. Masculinity 
oes not exclude childlike simplici- 
y in the spiritual realm. The 
hildlike complaint of the saintly 
esuit lay brother, telling our 
Jessed Mother that his faults pre- 



vented her from loving him as 
much as he loved her, and the 
motherly correction of his erro- 
neous idea, "that no human heart 
could love her as she loved it," 
appeals to our sin-scarred con- 
science. Certainly every fervent 
Passionist has proof of her remark 
in his own life. 

"The~virility of St. Paul of the 
Cross is beyond question. His pro- 
longed fasts, endurance of biting 
cold and intense heat, his many 
years of suffering, and his saintly 
courage manifested when leaving a 
sick bed to conduct a mission or 
a retreat, reveal him as a physical 
indifferentist. His spirituality is 
in marked contrast. He was a child 
of Mary unto childishness. His 
physical stamina is beyond imita- 
tion. He constantly ignored the 
small demands of the body, yet to 
us, seems to -have overemphasized 
the small and simple in his spirit- 
ual demands of the souls he direct- 
ed, and the injunctions of his Rule 
for his followers. 

His Rule demands the constant 
companionship of Mary for all 
Passionists.' Repetition of small 
acts unconsciously develops into a 
habit. He enjoins these small acts. 
When you go to another's cell, the 
religious extends permission to en- 
ter by saluting your companion : 
"Ave Maria:" you are to take her 
to recreation: "Jesus and Mary be 
praised;" on entering your cell, 
you kneel as a needy child to 



221 



prayerfully request her blessing on 
your thoughts, desires, words and 
deeds, by recalling to her the mys- 
tery of her motherhood by the 
devout recitation of the Hail Mary. 
You request the blessing of her 
conscious companionship when 
leaving your cell, with the same 
prayer. Good night to her divine 
Son is voiced in the trinity of Aves 
whispered to her before you drop 
a tired body on a straw bed. Quite 
a surprise to most of us, as novices, 
that a man's saint of the type of 
St. Paul of the Cross, could be so 
simple and childlike, even in his 
relations with the mother of God. 

He knew that the repetition of 
these acts during the novitiate 
and student life would develop into 
a beautiful habit of conscious com- 
panionship and spiritual reliance. 
Maybe you have, but I have never 
heard of an ex-Passionist who had 
been faithful to these little atten- 
tions to Our Blessed Mother. Diffi- 
cult to imagine a Passionist walk- 
ing out the front door of a mon- 
astery in union with Our Blessed 
Mother, never to return to the 
black habit of mourning for her 
Son's suffering and death. True 
devotion to Mary is not repulsive 
sentimentality. It is not the cele- 
brating of her well spaced feasts. 
Our physical mothers disliked sen- 
timentality in their sons as one 
extreme, and disliked the other, of 
indifference to her love and sac- 
rifice, except on her birthday. 



Through this habit of familijl 
companionship we, with her, e: 
tered the church to receive our fir' 
and subsequent confessions. It 
not surprising that fervent Pa 
sionists are reputed as understam 
ing and prudent confessors. S' 
Paul, the great apostle remarked 
"by sin Christ is crucified anew 
Yes, in the soul of a poor sinne 
A Passionist confessor realizes hi 
responsibility, when a weak huma! 
bares his soul to his priesthood, 
be resurrected through absolutio! 
to the state of sanctifying grace. 

"The Word was made flesh" i 
Mary, and it is eloquent and cor 
vincing, alive and vibrant wit 
earnestness when it is preached 
union with her. Our Holy Founde 
warns superiors not to entrust wit 
the sacred duty of preaching, thos 
whose lives lack a minimum o 
priestly virtues. Those afflict© 
with such faults are certainly nc 
companions of Mary. You refus 
to personalize the praise and flail 
tery of your auditors because yo 
alone are conscious of her part i: 
your sermon and preaching. 

During your preparation for He 1 
ly Mass, you are overcome wit 
the power and dignity of you' 
priesthood, because you are abod 
to offer in union with her, a Sac! 
rifice that even the mother ol 
Christ was powerless to offer. It i 
characteristic of a Passionist fr* 
offer the Mass decently. His medi' 
tations on the Sacred Passion, hi 



222 



lion with the mother of the Cru- 
fied permit him to act the Mass, 
id not merely to rush through a 
turgical performance. During 
lat sacred half hour, Christ the 
'iest and victim, his holy mother, 
■id the Passionist priest are unit- 
\, as at no other time of the day. 
he Passionist brother can recall 
le thirty years of Christ's unpar- 
leled intimacy with His holy 
other at Bethlehem, in Egypt, at 
azareth, and her near presence 
iiring His few years of active 
linistry. How much easier for 
lem to keep their intentions spir- 
;ual, in a life of manual duties, 
'hen the day is passed in chatting 
'ith her. 

Whether priest or brother, sen- 
imentality is foreign to our na- 
ure. We are too often, completely 
evoid of sentiment, and particu- 
irly so, of religious sentiment, 
fervour is a quickening grace; 
ridity in spiritual endeavours is 
ur natural and human experience. 

Love then, is of the very essence 
{ our being. As bachelors, woman 
s still the complement of man in 
he spiritual life. Christ gave her 
o us. Love for her should exist 
n our soul, intellect, will and mem- 
•ry, as well as in our grace-drenched 
motions. Our mutual love, mother 
or child and child for mother, 
nakes her an omnipresent and 
ompanionable person. It is but 
latural to carry on a line of chat- 
er with a person whom we love. 



From the moment we rise until 
we fall into a needed sleep, there 
should be a complete union of in- 
tentions and motives between us. 
Both have the same human and 
divine interests, the honor and 
glory of God and the salvation and 
salification of souls. 

The love of our natural mother 
prevented us from words and deeds 
that would bring sorrow to her 
heart or shame to her name. Love- 
found companionship with Mary is 
more inclusive, it prevents us from 
so much as a sinful thought. Seri- 
ous sin is impossible in a true child 
of Mary. Human faults or slight 
indiscretions are the heritage of 
our fallen nature. Such faults keep 
us conscious of our utter depen- 
dence upon the companionship of 
the mother of the Divine Grace. 

A woman informed me that she 
had lost her faith, and in the same 
breath inquired of the time of con- 
fessions. Are you sure you have 
lost your faith? Yes, Father, ab- 
solutely sure. Why are you in- 
quiring about the time confessions 
are received? I wish to go. How 
long since you have received the 
Sacraments? My husband and I 
are daily communicants. And you 
have lost your faith? My aston- 
ishment was complete. She noticed 
my perplexed look and added. "I 
am a better Catholic since I have 
lost it. I haven't faith but knowl- 
edge." Well, that theological dis- 
tinction from a lay person was too 



223 



much for me, so I requested her to 
clarify it. A car accident left her 
with an injury beyond medical 
science, a clamped nerve in a shat- 
tered hip. Surgery and medical aid 
failed, so her parents had a solari- 
um built. It was to be her little 
world. She had spent two years of 
helplessness, with recurrent attacks 
of internal pain, and still remained 
an ordinary Catholic. 

Friends had been bringing her 
books of fiction and all the popular 
magazines, as charitable gifts for 
an invalid. Finally, a friend of 
Our Blessed Mother brought her 
two pamphlets, one on prayer and 
the other on devotion to Mary. She 
read them with avidity and dis- 
cerned the defects in her prayers 
and the lack of faith in her devo- 
tion to our Blessed Mother. She 
resolved to correct both, so she 
started a novena. It consoled her, 
but pain was still an almost daily 
experience, so she promised to con- 
tinue them until released by death 
or cured. 

In the course of eight novenas of 
prayer and suffering, no cure or 
answer was in evidence, but she 
had become intimate and compan- 
ionable with our Blessed Mother. 
One morning, in the midst of the 
ninth novena, her mother and sis- 
ter entered to prepare her for the 
day, when suddenly a very beauti- 
ful woman appeared against the 
opposite wall. My visitor made a 
real but vain effort at describing 

224 



the so-called apparition. She stat< 
that our Blessed Mother's ga 
ments were so beautiful that a 
colors seem faded by comparisoi 

I remained skeptical but a litt'J 

more interested, so I encourage 

her to continue. Well, I felt a 

uncontrollable urge to go to ou 

Blessed Mother. When I attempte 

to rise, my mother and sister think 

ing my suffering had deranged me 

resisted my efforts. I requests 

them to leave the room, and t 

await me for breakfast in our din 

ing room. Father, I was instantl; 

cured. Cause and effect, I re 

marked. Did your good mother an( 

devoted sister see the Blesset 

Mother? No, Father. In womanlj 

fashion, she exclaimed, "Father 

why should I believe in the Blessec 

Virgin? I know her. She curec 

me. I have knowledge, not faith.'; 

You win. 

"Why, Father, I sometimes kneei 
for hours in Church talking to hen 
All day long I talk with her about 
my house work, etc. When relan 
tives hear me talking out loud and 
then discover I am apparently su 
lone, they think I am a mental 
case. I am never alone. I am the 
happiest woman in the United 
States." 

Spiritual love launched her inta 
a castigation of careless Catholics. 
How can they be indifferent and) 
even sinful in her presence? Free* 
will, I retorted. And by your own 
admission yours had been very 



•ee. I could not help pitying such 

woman. 

A Passionist's faith does not 
zed a sign or a visit of Mary, to 
ve and serve her, and her large 
imily, the human race. He much 
refers faith to her type of knowl- 
Ige, mindful of the rebuke of 
esus to doubting Thomas: "Be- 
mse thou hast seen me, thou hast 
elieved. Blessed are they who have 
ot seen, and yet have believed." 
John, 20,29) 

It requires a divine mind to com- 
rehend the intrinsic value of a 
oul, hence, no human can love him- 
elf as God loves him. The finite 
lind of Mary is almost infinite by 
omparison with our spiritual per- 
eptions and comprehensions, 
ence, our own physical mothers 
/ere unable to love us as she does, 
ihe the mother of Divine Grace 
nows the loveableness of the im- 
ge and likeness of her Son in our 
oul, as no other human. To be 
riore personal, we cannot love our- 
elves as intensely and extensively 
s she loves us. 

Woman is the complement of 
nan, hence we marvel at the com- 



pleteness of the plan of Redemp- 
tion, wherein God gives a celibate 
a legitimate right to personally 
love His holy mother, the most per- 
fect woman, and to love imperson- 
ally and spiritually all women, as 
His spiritual daughters. 

Our Fourth Vow directs our 
love to a special phase of our 
Blessed Mother's life. The heart's 
capacity for love is its measure 
for sorrow and suffering. A mother 
in bereavement is an affecting per- 
son. She reffects the sorrows of 
her loving heart. That reflection is 
penetrating and contagious — all 
feel with and for her. Words are 
less needful to sorrow than to joy. 
That is the reason why a tear on 
the cheek of the Sorrowful Mother 
is so eloquent. Our meditation has 
photographed her image on our 
minds. 

St. Paul of the Cross in our Holy 
Rule, seems to hold this ideal for 
each of us, sons. "Let this mind 
be in you that was also in Christ 
Jesus" (Phil. 2,6) that -the Sor- 
rowful Mother be the direct object 
of the human and spiritual love of 
your celibate hearts. 



Dr. Sijlv^Ux, C.<P. 



226 



Si quia infirm atur 



ML. 9xud ,atid Me ^Pick 



*f|F angels took a body and dwelt 
■ on earth, they would apply 
themselves to two things, serving 
Mass and waiting on the sick." 
Thus spoke our Holy Founder re- 
garding the sick brethren and the 
attitude we should display toward 
them at all times. This applies in 
a special way to the brother in- 
firmarian. 

I. 

Our Saint's prudence to prevent 
sickness among his religious was 
equalled only by his charity for the 
infirm. From Father Cajetan's 
writings, we read as follows: 

"He had the habit of saying that 
to wait on the sick required a 
mother or a saint. He himself was 
one and the other for them, a Saint 
and a mother. . . . When a religious 
was sick, the Servant of God has- 
tened to procure suitable remedies 
for him. He had the doctor called 
to prescribe treatment. ... To Fa- 
ther Fulgentius he writes: 'I beg 
your Reverence, please, through 
love for Jesus Christ and for holy 
obedience, to take care of yourself, 
divide the work and retain only 
the less tiring for yourself. You 
will thus be doing the will of God.' 
Many are the letters in which he 
insists that Father Fulgentius take 
exemptions and remedies required 
by his condition. He went so far 

226 



as to charge two Fathers to watcf 
him and gave them authority oveij 
the sufferer to this effect. " 'Wher 
I felt indisposed,' states Brother! 
Bartholomew, 'I was very careful 
not to tell him because he would 
have ordered me immediately not) 
to rise for Matins and to take] 
other dispensations. He acted the| 
same with all the others.' " 
II. 

"The Servant of God wentj 
promptly and diligently to the sick- 
religious. Although infirm himself: 
and able to climb the stairs only] 
with great pain, he did not dis- 
pense himself from these visits . . , 
'As long as he was robust and rela- 
tively young, he rendered to thej 
sick all the material services inl 
his power. He prepared the reme- 
dies with his own hands and ap- 
plied or had them take them. He; 
granted all the assistance which 
his fatherly tenderness inspired,' 
adds Father John Mary. 

"From a student we hear: 'I 
fell sick and the Servant of God 
visited me day and night and gave 
me quinine with his own hands.' 

"At this time according to the 
Rule, only on account of sickness 
could the religious eat meat. And 
so, when in 1765 an epidemic broke 
out a second time at the Retreat 
of St. Angelo and a great many of 



le religious fell ill, the Servant of 
rod, at the advice of the doctor, 
ermitted meat to be eaten (for 
he time). In the process for can- 
nization we read likewise that the 
»aint allowed meat to a Father 
uffering from stomach trouble; 
imilarly to the community of St. 
Custace, all the members of which, 
yith the exception of one or two, 
vere ill. 

"Also at times when the physi- 
:ian had deemed the native air 
vould be profitable, he now and 
hen permitted the sick to return 
;o their homes for a while. He 
icted in this wise with Father 
Dominic of St. Anthony and with 
Father Joseph Hyacinth of St. 
Catherine and both recuperated, 
thanks to native air. 'I hope that 
your native air will do you good,' 
writes he to the first, 'but what 
will do you still more good is to 
resign yourself to the Divine good 
pleasure, and to dwell solitary in 
the interior temple while adoring 
God, in spiritu et veritate, and 
clothing yourself more and more 
perfectly with the virtues of Jesus 
Christ.' 

"Our Saint's charitable attention 
continued to be directed to the re- 
covered or almost recovered sick. 
He reprimanded the convalescents 
if he saw them conforming with 
rigors of the Rules which exceeded 
their strength. 'I hope,' writes the 
Saint to a Rector, 'that our sick 
will be well by now. However, let 



them be on their guard, especially 
your Reverence, for those who are 
cured thank to quinine are subject 
to relapses. Let them avoid eating 
sour things and other indigestible 
foods.' 

"After a general chapter held at 
the Retreat of St. Angelo, the Ser- 
vant of God assembled the Capitu- 
lar Fathers a last time and insis- 
tently recommended the care of 
the sick to all of them, especially 
to the Rectors. He laid before their 
eyes the grave obligation of exer- 
cising the most tender charity in 
their regard. If the house were 
too poor to meet the expenses, they 
had but to sell the sacred vessels. 
(Several witnesses cite these words 
of the Saint as spoken in divers 
circumstances. Hence, this would 
have been one of his habitual ex- 
pressions.) He expressed himself 
with intimate conviction, letting it 
be understood that he spoke as 
Superior General and that he meant 
to be obeyed." 

III. 

We have seen with what holy 
solicitude our Father dealt with 
the sick and now we shall consider 
and discuss the extent to which he 
went to make certain that superiors 
and infirmarians fulfilled their du- 
ties toward the sick according to 
his own views. 

"The rooms and all the linens for 
their use had to be respendent for 
neatness." Neatness implies clean- 

227 



liness, so even in the first days of 
the Congregation when the Re- 
treats were very poor, our Holy 
Founder insisted that whenever 
possible, clean linens be used for 
the sick. We can judge from this 
just what his insistence upon this 
point would be during this our day, 
when we have every means to pro- 
vide for this necessary comfort for 
the sick. He most certainly would 
condemn an infirmarian who would 
put a religious to bed without put- 
ting on clean sheets and pillow 
slips if the others were at all soiled. 
And likewise, our Holy Founder 
would surely find fault with allow- 
ing a religious to remain in bed a 
number of days and not changing 
the linens frequently. If necessary, 
the linens should be changed daily. 

"Their food had to be prepared 
in a way that they might derive 
every desirable relief. To make 
sure, he often went to the kitchen. 
Nothing was to be omitted, he used 
to say, that could solace them, nor 
was anything to be cut down in the 
doctor's prescriptions." Note that 
he did not say that they should be 
satisfied with just anything be- 
cause they were austere Passion- 
ists. In his mind, they were human 
beings first of all, and should be 
treated as any person who is ill. 
Here is the spirit, the true spirit, 
that should be manifested at all 
times toward the sick, for it is the 
spirit of the Holy Founder who 
wrote the rules and descended to 



such particulars in his reference 
to the sick brethren. 

Consider further his statement,! 
"their food had to be prepared in 
a way that they might derive every 
desirable relief." That was about 
the year 1760 when little attention 
was given to the diets for the sick 
even amongst the well-to-do. Hei 
saw in some manner the close re-f 
lation between the feeding of their i 
bodies and their speedy recovery. 
Since he so insisted that the quali- 
ty of the food be proper and that 
it be properly prepared, and this! 
at a time in history when the 
choice of food was limited and the 
preparation was not too much con- 
sidered, what do we supposed he 
would say to us today with the 
nearly unlimited resources at our 
disposal? Following his example, 
the infirmarian should see to it 
that the sick are given those foods 
which their particular condition 
calls for and that the food is pre- 
pared in the best way possible. 
We cannot render the "relief" our 
Holy Founder insists upon when 
we serve a sick religious foods 
that could prove harmful to his 
present condition, or when we serve 
the food in an unappetizing way. 
It is also good policy to discover 
the likes and dislikes of the sick 
and to cater to them in this regard 
if at all possible, for it is errone- 
ous to expect a sick person to eat 
food which he finds difficult to take 
even when he is well. If in some 



228 



ases, a specialized diet is needed, 
hen the infirmarian should make 
very attempt to acquaint himself 
vith the type of diet called for 
ind follow the diet closely. 

"At the Retreat of the Presenta- 
ion, three or four religious were 
11. Father Paul asked Brother Jo- 
seph, cook and infirmarian, what 
le had served them. 'Bread and 
)il soup,' responded the brother, 
because there was no boullion.' 
in the ardor of his charity, Father 
Paul replied, That is no way to 
;reat the poor sick.' 

" 'During my serious illness at 
he Hospice of the Holy Crucifix in 
lome,' relates a witness, 'he used 
o come to my room at the exact 
noment to see if I had all requisite 
issistance. To keep the infirmari- 
ins on the alert, he came noise- 
essly.' " 

Incidents such as these show 
:learly the way our Holy Founder 
vould have us act toward the sick 
•eligious. When we act otherwise, 
ve do not have the spirit of St. 
3 aul of the Cross. 

IV. 

In the regulations which the 
>aint composed and established in 
he Congregation, he devotes an 
;ntire chapter to instructing the 
nfirmarian how he should acquit 
limself of his office. Here it is: 

1. Animated by that charity rec- 
•mmended by our Holy Rule, the 
nfirmarian shall remember that to 



care well for the sick requires the 
mother or the Saint. 

2. To succour the sick, let him 
leave every act of piety or of the 
regular observance. 

3. Let him renew his spirit of 
Faith and consider in the sick the 
person of Jesus Christ Who said, 
"I was sick," etc. 

4. Let him bear with every com- 
plaint or disapproval on the part 
of the sick. Let him blame, not his 
bad will, but his malady. 

5. Let him be attentive to have 
the boullion, food, and prescribed 
remedies taken on time. Let him 
often take a look in the kitchen to 
see that the food is prepared be- 
comingly and properly seasoned. 

6. Let him from time to time 
endeavor to console and encourage 
the sufferer. Let him show him 
compassion and suggest holy 
thoughts to him. If the patient's 
condition permit, let him make a 
short spiritual reading for him 
each day. 

7. Let him use great modesty in 
washing the sick or in changing 
their linens. Let him not allow 
himself to be led, through false 
compassion, to give foods forbid- 
den by the doctor, and let him 
keep the room neat, without any 
odor. 

8. Let him be attentive when the 
doctor is giving his prescriptions. 
Let him grasp them well in order 
to execute them. If his memory is 
poor, let him take a note of them. 



229 



9. Let him not say anything 
scornful, sharp, or disagreeable to 
the sick, in order not to augment 
the suffer's affliction. 

From the foregoing counsels, we 
can easily perceive the spirit of 
charity of a Saint. We, his chil- 
dren, cannot possibly go wrong by 
copying this spirit of St. Paul of 
the Cross in all its detail. When 
we see the minute particulars to 
which he descended, we must be 
convinced that were our Holy 
Founder living today he most as- 
suredly would insist that our sick 
brethren have the benefit of those 
aids that science offers. It seems 
safe to say also that he would see 
to it that our lay brothers be well 
instructed according to the method 
and technique of caring for the 
sick. He asks us to see Christ in 
our sick brethren and if we con- 
stantly strive to do so, then no 
task will be too great, no one too 
small, to undertake in their behalf. 

Finally, the brothers may, be- 
cause of circumstances, be able to 
offer legitimate excuse for not 
knowing sufficient of the technical 
side of taking care of the sick, 
but there is absolutely no excuse 
to offer when a brother is not 
faithful to the mere fundamentals 
upon which St. Paul insisted so 
much during his life. The latter 
are the ordinary, common-sense 
things, such as cleanliness in all 
things: the room, the linens, the 
food tray, and particularly concern- 

230 



ing our own person, our handjf 
etc. Sickness is caused by germgi 
and the infirmarian above all mua 
take care not to carry any mor 
to the sick religious. It is thes* 
seemingly little things that prov 
to be so much, either for the com 
fort or discomfort of the patient 
Because our brethren do not cord 
plain of any lack of proper treat 
ment does not justify any laxity 01 
the part of the brother infirmarian 
for they refrain from complaining 
out of charity, which the infirmari 
an should be practicing more s* 
than the patient. 

Too much care cannot be giver 
the food tray. As infirmarian w* 
are trying to make the religious 
comfortable and to help them alonj 
to a speedy recovery. We certainlj 
do not accomplish this when we put 
little effort into preparing the traj 
they may be getting. We must look 
to the policy of our modern hos* 
pitals and see the stress that they 
place on the psychology of feeding 
a patient. Our religious are de- 
serving, according to the spirit oi 
our Holy Founder, of the same 
consideration. Therefore, we must 
give every care to this major fac- 
tor and be sure that the patient is 
getting the proper foods, prepared 
in the proper way, (hot things hoi 
and cold things cold) and served 
in the proper manner. 

To conclude, we may say that we 
are not catering to human weak- 
nesses or encouraging the sick 



)ethren toward unnecessary solici- 
;ude for their health because, first, 
ve have the example of our Holy 
founder himself and his personal 
;are for the sick as a model. Sec- 
mdly, we learned also of his con- 
stant insistence that superiors and 
nfirmarians be exacting and tire- 
ess in this regard. Thirdly, we 
lave St. Paul's own counsels which 
lave been incorporated in the Rules 



and Regulations pertaining to the 
infirmarian and care of the sick 
brethren. Lastly, there is the proof 
of extensive professional experi- 
ence that exacting care and atten- 
tion of the sick hastens a speedy 
recovery. 

"AS LONG AS YOU DID IT 
TO THE LEAST OF THESE MY 
BRETHREN, YOU DID IT UNTO 
ME." 



Bxotkx £ 



unon, 



C.<P. 



"LOVE ON STAGE OF GOD" 

(From a Miracle Play) 

Love has a glamor show 
Fresh as a brook doth flow. 
Man pinned to a tree below. 
God has a tree as foe. 

God is Man on tree — 
Love eternal free. 
Doubts of mind can flee. 
In flair of blood we see! 

Crucifix is glamor show — 
Seduction of God's heart! 
How can we then love know 
When God has pain in part?! 

God has pain in birth — 
Birth of Love — God anew. 
The glamor of pain birth 
Will joy life ever thru. 

LOVE has a glamor show — 
Fresh as a brook doth flow. 
Man pinned to a tree below 
God has a tree as foe. 




Fr. Austin, C. P. 



231 



Persevere in Prayer 



^ijou^Ijts 0tt Prater 



lOR anyone who gives himself to 
a life of prayer, — as we Passion- 
ists do, — it is good to keep always 
in mind the object or purpose of 
all this prayer. The purpose of our 
prayer is to come to a great love 
for God. St. John of the Cross tells 
us in his Ascent of Mount Carmel 
(I,c.ll,2) what this love for God 
or union with God consists in: "The 
state of union consists in the total 
transformation of the will into the 
will of God, in such a way that 
every movement of the will shall 
be always the will of God." And 
again he says, "That soul has a 
greater communion with God, 
which is most advanced in love, 
that is, whose will is most con- 
formed to the will of God." (II, 
5,3) 

We can see then that the fruit 
to be aimed at in our meditations 
and in all forms of mental prayer 
is the avoidance of sin and delib- 
erate faults, the careful observance 
of our rules, and eventually, the 
complete surrender of our will and 
of our whole life to the plans, the 
arrangements, the will of God. Nu- 
merous quotations could be brought 
forward to show how our Holy 
Founder proposed this as the end 
we should propose to ourselves in 
prayer. "The highest perfection 
consists in being perfectly united 

2.">2 



to the Holy Will of God; the on< 
most united and transformed into 
this divine good-pleasure is the ho 
liest," (L,I,292) he says. (Cfr. als« 
1,591). Such, clearly, was tin 
object of St. Teresa of Avila placecj 
before her followers, as is seen 
repeatedly in her writings. (e.g.| 
Interior Castle, 2nd Man., no. 15 
Way of Perf. 16,2; Life 11,20) 
Not sweetness in prayer, but the) 
surrender of our will to the wil 
of God, that is the thing to be) 
sought in prayer. Progress ir 
prayer is to be measured, not bjJ 
the increase of sweetness at prayer.' 
but by the degree of practical con^ 
formity and abandonment to God's 
will. As the soul makes progress 
in this way, it will eventually findl 
that this is love, though to the! 
beginner, this may not seem to b© 
the love that the soul is or should) 
be seeking. But let the soul go 
that way with generosity and it 
will find the love of God. 

A second thought that might bel 
suggested for one who gives him- 
self to prayer is this : one should* 
begin with great determination! 
and resolution to persevere in hisj 
prayer, no matter what difficulties^ 
he may meet with on the way;i 
whether he receive consolations or) 
not; no matter what apparent fail- 
ure befalls him, "whether they J 



each the goal or die on the road, 
r the earth itself goes to pieces 
eneath them," as St. Teresa of 
.Vila says. (Life, XV, 5,7,9) This 
3 a thought that St. Teresa re- 
urns to a number of times, con- 
idering it of great importance. 
>ut then she does give us this 
onsoling assurance, that those 
rho do begin with this determina- 
ion, "have already traveled a 
reat part of the road." {Life, 

:i,20) 

How necessary such determina- 
ion is we see from the example of 
ur Holy Founder, who at times 
ound prayer so difficult and had 
uch temptations to leave it that he 
yas obliged to resolve to stay and 
inish it, "even thought it were nec- 
ssary to carry me away in small 
)ieces." (Diary, Dec. 10). 

Relative to progress in one's 
>rayer, our Holy Founder clearly 
ecognized that the prayer of the 
>eginner would be different from 
hat of the proficient; and again, 
hat the prayer of the more per- 
r ect would differ still further. (L,I, 
153). To the beginner, he coun- 
leled meditation, that is, more for- 
nal considerations and reflections, 
—especially on the Passion. He 
:ounseled going through the Pas- 
iion, taking a particular scene each 
lay, applying it to one's own life 
ind making acts or affections of 
he will on each scene. Such in- 
itructions on meditation are brief 
iml simple, not calling for any in- 



volved method. The following is 
typical of many such instructions. 
"I will give you an example," he 
writes to Teresa Palozzi, "Picture 
to yourself the scourging. 'Ah, my 
sweet Jesus, You were condemned 
to be scourged, and then those 
wretches led You to the place of 
scourging, where in the presence of 
all those people You were stripped 
of Your poor clothes. Because of 
this, Your most beautiful and most 
precious Body trembled and shiv- 
ered from the cold.' Here pause a- 
while and makes acts of love. 'Oh, 
my Jesus, my Love, how can I see 
you thus stripped of Your clothing! 
Why is He who clothes the naked 
so rudely stripped of His own gar- 
ments?... Oh, my love, should I 
not strip myself of all love for this 
world and creatures, if You the 
King of kings and glory of heaven, 
were thus stripped for my sake? 
Oh, when shall I give You my 
heart?" 

St. Paul realized the necessity of 
meditation, properly so called, for 
beginners, — that is, reasoned re- 
flection and considerations. Such 
reflection is necessary to form deep 
convictions in the soul about the 
matters of faith. It also helps 
greatly in overcoming particular 
faults. However, he so stressed the 
affections or acts of the will at 
prayer that he seemed to lead souls 
rather quickly to the prayer of 
affection, — that is, a prayer in 
which there is relatively little of 



■i:v.\ 



formal consideration, but rather 
the prayer is principally a conver- 
sation with our Lord. (cfr. Doc- 
trine of St. Paul on Prayer, by 
Cajetan, p. 53, etc.) 

In this prayer he insisted that 
the soul should pause frequently. 
"You must pause awhile at these 
affections, as I said before; pause 
with the gaze of lively faith upon 
the mystery, so that your soul may 
be more inflamed with love," he 
writes. 

He urged the soul to remain in 
the sentiments of each particular 
act for some time, not being in a 
hurry to pass on to other acts. He 
compares the soul making these 
acts to one dropping perfume upon 
a ball of cotton. He urges the soul 
not to drop more perfume till the 
first drop has thoroughly penetrat- 
ed the entire ball of cotton. "Let 
these affections of love drop upon 
your soul as drops of perfume, so 
that you may be entirely perfumed 
and sweetened with the love of 
God. . . . Pause quietly in these 
sentiments; let yourself be pene- 
trated entirely by the love of God. 
When you have finished one, go on 
to another." (cfr. L,I,103 et al.) 
This was to apply equally to other 
acts, abandonment, humility, etc. 
He also asserted often that the soul 
went to prayer as much to listen 
as to speak, and to receive from 
God even more than to give. 

As these pauses became more 
frequent and more enduring, thus 

234 



fixing deeper and deeper the dispo 
sitions of the soul towards God, 
dispositions of humility, submis 
sion, abandonment, love, etc., — thl 
soul passes almost imperceptibly 
into the prayer, variously called 
the prayer of simple regard, thl 
prayer of simplicity, of loving at 
tention, or as our Holy Founder 
preferred to call it, the prayer oi 
faith. His letters encouraging sucl 
prayer are very numerous. (L,I 
229, 352, 401, 508, etc. 

This is an important lesson tha 
our Holy Founder gives us: U 
recognize that formal meditation 
that is, reasoned reflection and con 
sideration is not meant to be th< 
life-long prayer of the faithful re 
ligious. And such is the commoi' 
teaching of the masters of the spir 
itual life. (cfr. Cajetan, Doctrine 
of St. Paul, p. 40, seq.; Lagrange 
Three Ages, ch. 35) 

Such simple loving attention U 
God is experienced, at times, bj 
every soul who is faithful to itd 
prayer and to the habit of recol 
lection and mortification. But how 
is the soul to pray when, aftei 
this, it finds itself in aridity, ap 
parently able to do nothing? Wher 
the soul is unable to meditate anc 
is filled with distractions? Wher 
it seems as if the soul is doing 
little more than wasting time 
What has happened? Is the soul 
going backward? It certainly seems 
lost, as far as the ways of prayei 
are concerned. 



Could it be that some religious 
r ail to see that this is a common, 
ret definite form of prayer; that 
t is a form of prayer because the 
vill is all the while truly united 

God. Could failure to appreciate 
his be the reason why we some- 
imes become discouraged with our 
)rayer; why we sometimes are in- 
ilined to think that it is time ac- 
iually wasted; or at least that it 
night be more usefully spent oth- 
erwise and are therefore inclined 
;o look for excuses to get out of 
Drayer? Could this be the reason 
vhy some attach no more value to 
:he time of mental prayer than to 
iny other act of obedience to the 
rule? the reason why others feel 
that they are not 'cut out' by dis- 
position or by gifts for this life 
3f prayer, and hence lose practical 
interest in prayer? 

But actually, our Holy Founder 
would say to such souls, as he did 
write to many such, "This is an 
excellent sign." "Do not be dis- 
turbed. This is entirely to be ex- 
pected." "You are going the way 
that you always wanted to go." 

"In desolations and aridities we 
must love the will of God who or- 
dains them. We should rejoice to 
remain on the cross with Jesus 
Christ, and abandon ourselves ab- 
solutely to the divine good-pleasure. 

1 say you should rejoice in the 
aridity and other desolations you 
experience, at Holy Communion as 
well as in other exercises. Love 



the divine will in these sufferings. 
I assure you that God will thereby 
divest you of self-love and dispose 
you for greater graces." (L,I, 453; 
L,III,302;passim) 

The soul should, of course, do 
what it can to help itself. It should 
strive to remain attentive to God. 
It should strive to make acts of 
abandonment to the will of God, to 
humble itself before God and to 
love Him. (L,I,103) Not that it 
should strive to arouse sensible de- 
votion within itself. To aim at 
that would be a mistake. But it 
should be content to make these 
acts, and to mean them, and still 
be content to have no feeling of 
sensible devotion. Sometimes it 
will seem to be so helpless that all 
it can do is to "remain in the pres- 
ence of God, like a statue in its 
niche, detached from all consola- 
tions." (L,I,103) 

"Despite your great aridities and 
desolations, your soul is amassing 
immense treasures . . . Realize that 
by this spiritual aridity our most 
gentle Jesus is preparing and purg- 
ing your heart to transform it, 
through His mercy, in His sacred 
love." (L,I,27) 

Hence St. Paul's exhortation: 
"Never cease mental prayer: make 
it every day, even if you remain 
like a rock during it." as he wrote 
to the members of his own family. 

It would be very easy to confirm 
this teaching of our Holy Founder 
by both the teaching and the ex- 

286 



perience of the saints. The saints 
tell us that the great work of this 
apparently useless, hopeless, un- 
profitable prayer is, — if the soul is 
reasonably sincere in its efforts 
and good will, — the purification of 
its faith and love ; that God, despite 
the dryness of their prayer, feeds 
these souls secretly with strength 
and love ; and that this is the 
preparation of soul that God ac- 
complishes in those whom He 
deigns to call to infused prayer. 
But suffice it for us here to draw 
our practical conclusions : not to 



be surprised. . . , not to be discouri 
aged . . . , not to be disturbed . . . i: 
we find our prayer difficult and uni 
satisfactory. 

If we persevere in a sincere im 
terest in our prayer and if w« 
"endeavor with all diligence to be; 
recollected during the day in thd 
presence of God, to be lovers ol 
solitude, to practice mortification 
and to observe with exactness ever 
the smallest precepts of the Holy 1 
Rule," then despite all aridity and 
apparent failure, God will lead us| 
to a great love of Himself. 



Let us persevere unceasingly in our hope, and in the pledge of oun 
righteousness, that is, in Christ Jesus, "Who bore our sins in his own 
Body upon the tree, who did no sin, neither was guile found in his 
mouth," (I Pet. 2,24) but for our sakes, that we might live in him; 
endured all things. Let us then be imitators of his endurance and if we 
suffer for His name's sake, let us glorify Him. For this is the example 
which He gave us in Himself, and this is what we have believed. 

St. Polycarp, Epistle to the Philippians, viii, 1. 



236 



Inother St. Gemma. 



<Jl Second JClttle Sister 



ik/E Passionists are already ac- 
▼ ▼ quainted with little Maria 
Joretti whom Divine Providence 
las given to our Congregation to 
>e, like St. Gemma, a co-worker in 
>ur ministry and another "little 
lister." But are we as devoted to 
ler as we should be? Do we, in 
'act, really know her? Is her cause, 
vhich is the same as that of Jesus 
Afho suffered His scourging to save 
nen from impurity, known to us? 
is it furthered in the many oppor- 
;unities we have as preachers of 
;he Passion? 

Maria Goretti was born in Italy 
bn October 16, 1890. She is of our 
>wn age. Her parents were Luigi 
3k>retti and Assunta Carlini; de- 
/out, hard-working farmers. When 
Maria was nine, her father fell ill 
ind died shortly afterwards. His 
ieath left an indelible mark of 
sorrow in Maria's soul. Every day 
she would visit his grave and re- 
cite the rosary for the repose of 
lis soul. *! |H 

With the death of Luigi, Assun- 
ta Goretti had to struggle to sup- 
port her family of six small chil- 
dren. In order to pay off a debt 
left by Luigi, she agreed to work 
in the fields of a certain Giovanni 
Serenelli. The agreement was 
that she should bring her family 
to live with Giovanni Serenelli and 



his son, Allessandro. Assunta was 
to work in the fields while Maria 
tended the household affairs. This 
arrangement was far from satis- 
factory. Under the circumstances, 
however, it was the best the poor 
mother could do. 

For almost two years the Gor- 
ettis bore the well-nigh intolera- 
ble situation of sharing the home 
and work of the Serenellis. To 
make matters worse, Allesandro, 
the eighteen-year-old son of Gio- 
vanni, had conceived in his heart a 
burning, lustful desire for Maria. 
At the age of twelve she was be- 
coming quite an attractive girl. 
Twice Allesandro suggested sin to 
Maria. Twice she vehemently re- 
pulsed him. Poor Maria was thor- 
oughly frightened by the youth's 
evil intentions. She was careful to 
follow the advice of Christ in the 
garden : "Watch and pray that you 
enter not into temptation." 

Matters came to a head on July 
5 1902. Only two months earlier. 
on the feast of Corpus Christi. 1 
Maria had received her first Holy 
Communion. Since that joyous day 
she was more determined than ever 
not to give Allesandro any occasion 
to renew his evil intentions. How- 
ever, on the fifth of July Maria 
was alone in the house. Allesandro 
knew it. He left the field and re- 

287 



turned to the house. When Maria 
saw him coming, suspecting trou- 
ble, she stepped out into the yard 
where she could call her mother, 
if need be. Allesandro entered the 
kitchen and called to Maria to come 
inside. She refused. Then, before 
the startled girl knew what was 
happening, he was out of the door, 
had her by the arm and dragged 
her inside. He closed and bolted 
the door. Again he asked the ter- 
rified girl to surrender to him. But 
Maria cried out: "No! It is a sin. 
God forbids!" He threatened to 
kill her if she resisted. He even 
showed her a knife, its twelve-inch 
blade razor-sharp. Still she re- 
fused, warning him that he would 
go to hell if he did this awful 
thing. This time Allesandro was 
not to be put off. He grabbed her. 
Maria struggled and cried out a- 
gain and again; "No, No! It is a 
sin. God forbids it!" Then the 
enraged youth plunged the blade 
fourteen times into her virginal 
body ! The girl slumped to the floor, 
all but dead. Allesandro, now ter- 
rified at what he had done, rushed 
from the room. Maria, like Jesus 
at the pillar, had paid a high price 
for holy purity. 

Slowly, painfully, she pulled her- 
self to the door and called for help. 
A short while later they had her 
taken to a hospital in the neigh- 
boring town of Nettuno. There for 
twenty-four hours Maria endured 
agonies of pain. A burning fever 



racked her body. As she was dyn 
ing the chaplain asked her if shei 
would forgive her murderer andi 
pray for his salvation, as Jesus had 
done for the Good Thief. Maria 
replied weakly: "Yes, I forgive 
him as our Lord forgave, and II 
wish him to be in Paradise withl 
me." 

On her death bed Maria wasi 
enrolled as a Child of Mary. Short- 
ly afterwards she received Holyj 
Viaticum. Then, racked with pain 
until the end, she breathed forth 
her pure soul into the hands of 
God. Her body indeed was torn 
and bruised, but her soul was with-J 
out blemish. One more lily planted 
by Christ at the foot of the pillari 
had burst into full bloom. 

Almost immediately the story of 
Maria Goretti's triumph wasi 
spread far and wide. Her body; 
was laid to rest in the Passionisti 
Church of our Lady of Grace atl 
Nettuno. In 1929 the tomb wasi 
opened for the official recognition 
of the body. In May, 1935, the 
first session of the Court of Infor- 
mation for her Beatification was 
held. On March 24, 1945, in the 
presence of our Holy Father Pope 
Pius XII, the decree recognizing 
the martyrdom of the Servant of 
God was read. In May of that 
same year the decree "Tuto," per- 
mitting her solemn Beatification, 
was proclaimed. 

Two years ago, on the eve of the 
feast of our Holy Founder, 1947, 



238 



n majestic St. Peter's at Rome, 
here took place the impressive 
eremony of Beatification. Little 
/[aria Goretti, modern martyr of 
loty purity was declared by his 
loliness the Pope, to be among 
he blessed of heaven. Assunta 

oretti enjoyed the wonderful and 
mique experience of assisting at 
he magnificent ceremony of the 
ratification of her own little 
laughter. Besides great dignitar- 
es of the Church, Superiors of our 

Congregation, and thousands of the 
'aithful, Allesandro Serenelli, Ma- 
nia's assassin, also attended the 
Beatification ceremony. 

In the short space of two years 
ince that happy day, Blessed Ma- 
ria Goretti has taken Italy and 
many sections of Europe by storm. 
She has become the hope and hero- 
ine of countless boys and girls, 
men and women of every walk of 
fe. What a pity, then, if the Con- 
gregation of Passionists, to whose 
care her cause is entrusted, should 
lag behind in the interest every- 
where else shown her! 

The miracles and favors for soul 
and body being obtained through 
her intercession increase day by 
day. Great is her power and influ- 
ence with the Master for Whom 
she died. 

There is much to be hoped for 
toward the spiritual improvement 
of the faithful of our own United 
States through Maria Goretti's in- 
tercession. And Maria is anxious 



to help. All she needs is that her 
brothers, the Passionists in the 
United States, make her known. 

To know Blessed Maria is to 
love her. It follows quite obviously 
that we ourselves must foster a 
personal devotion to her. Thus only 
can we expect to be able to teach 
others to know and love her too. 
For this there are needed accounts 
of her life and heroic martyrdom 
written in English. The few works 
available are inadequate and in- 
sufficient. In recent numbers of 
The Passionist 2 something has been 
done by way of a beginning. This 
article is intended to further the 
work. Recently we heard that a 
member of our Province has just 
completed a pamphlet on Maria 
Goretti. Now we hope that some 
others of our English-speaking 
brethren will be moved to write 
more in book or pamphlet form. 
Magazine articles could do much 
good too. 

The Dominican Sisters of the 
Perpetual Rosary' have translated 
the Italian pamphlet of Rev. Fa- 
ther Aurelius of the Passion, C.P. 
However, for an American public, 
good American works are still bad- 
ly needed. 1 

Our Brethren in other parts of 
the world have left us far behind 
in the happy work of introducing 
little Maria Goretti to the laity. 
In Natoye, Belgium, for instance, 
our Fathers have established 
a "Blessed Maria Goretti Center" 

289 



where information concerning her 
cult and cause can be obtained. 5 
Relics, picture cards, medals, etc., 
are available too. Recently these 
same Passionists devoted an entire 
number of their Revue Passioniste 
to Blessed Maria. Our own Pas- 
sionist has undertaken a Maria 
Goretti Center on a small scale, 
with cards, medals, etc., now a- 
vailable. 

Meanwhile, until more is done 
in print to spread devotion to 
Maria, what practical suggestions 
can we make? We suggest preach- 
ing the story of her life. If you 
do not think it will interest the 
faithful, just try it some Sunday 
morning, and watch the reaction 
on your audience, young and old. 
Maria Goretti is needed by Catho- 
lics and is modern enough to appeal 
to them. This is the only reason 
our Mother the Church has taken 
this little girl, all but unknown, 
and brought her before the eyes 
of the world. 

Her influence i?> powerful in the 
confessional, too. A short ferver- 
ino on her love for holy purity can 
touch the heart in a remarkable 



way. Her example is encouraging 
to all. 

Then, of course, there is the 
opportunity many of our priests 
have to tell the boys and girls ir 
our schools about Maria. This car. 
be done in our own parishes, ano 
by the missionaries during triei 
children's mission. 

Lastly, prayer to Maria is urged 
for all — those engaged in the active 
works and those who remain at 
home. We should pray that Al- 
mighty God will continue to bless 
the world through His little Ser-I 
vant Maria. We should pray thati 
she will continue to exert her in-J 
fluence in heaven in behalf of our! 
ministry. Lastly, we should pray; 
that our congregation will sooru 
share in the honor of having this;! 
new little Sister raised to the altar 
— Saint Maria Goretti. 

While the glorious day of heri 
canonization is ardently longed for,' 
let us Passionists in America strive* 
for a personal devotion to Maria; 
Goretti. After that is acquired, iti 
will be a labor of love to spread: 
her cause among the clergy, re- 
ligious, and faithful with whom we 
come in contact. 



i The date of Maria's first Communion is disputed. This is the date her mother 
insists upon. 2 Passionist Bulletin, Mar. 25, 1946. No. 18, p. 12, Modern St. Agnes. 
Nov. 21. 1947. No. 28, p. 9. Blessed Maria Goretti. a The Blue Chapel. 14th & West St., 
Union City, N.J. J Maria Goretti Center. Address: R. P. Evariste, Revue Passioniste, 
Natoye, Belgium, b There are several accounts of Maria Goretti's life written in Italian; 
there is also one about to be published in English. 



<?t. Campion, C.<P. 



240 



Novitiate 



PASSIONIST CUSTOMS 

1937 Official Latin Edition 

mmmary: I. Canonical Enclosure. II. Examination of Aspirants. III. Aspirants to Brother- 
fed. IV. Documents Required of Postulants. V. Father Master (and Local Chapter). VI. 
foper Training of Novices. VII-XII. Siuns of a true vocation: VII. Sincerity. VIII, Obedi- 
nce. IX. Detachment. X. Silence. XI. Modesty. XII. Humility. XIII. Acts of Mortification. 
OV-XVII. Novitiate Horarium : XIV. Morning. XV Noon Recreation. XVI. Afternoon. XVII. 
Evening. XVIII. Manual Offices and Spirit of Recollection. XIX. Preparations for Profes- 
sion. XX. Departure of Novices. XXI. Priest-novices. 



I. Canon Law requires strict en- 
closure for the novitiate to prevent 
the professed religious (to say 
nothing of lay people) from enter- 
ing without the permission of the 
Superior, Father Master — or in his 
absence, Father Vice-Master. 
Should a lay person ever be allowed 
to visit the premises, all the nov- 
ices must first retire to their cells. 
Every novice should have a cell of 
his own furnished quite simply as 
the Holy Rule requires. Besides 
wash-rooms the enclosure ought to 
have a recreation room and a chap- 
ter room, which can also serve as 
an oratory. 

When the novitiate is established 
in a retreat where professed re- 
side, a door or gate marks the 
entrance to the novices' corridor 
and separates them from the rest 
of the religious. The gates of the 
enclosure are always kept locked, 
and the keys retained by Father 
Master or Father Vice-Master. A 
small bell placed near the gate is 
used to signal when the gate is to 
be opened. Finally, Canon 561 re- 
quires Father Master, or at least 



Father Vice-Master, to reside in 
the enclosure with the novices. 

II. Our Holy Rule delegates the 
examination and acceptance of pos- 
tulants to the General or Provin- 
cial, but either of these may allow 
another priest to perform the task. 
To shed more light on the meaning 
of this examination, we will briefly 
append the rules laid down by our 
Holy Founder. The candidate must 
be asked why he wants to join the 
Congregation : i.e., is it his inten- 
tion to save his soul by becoming 
a saint and to crucify his passions 
by observing our Rule and per- 
fectly imitating Jesus Christ? The 
examiner must carefully enquire a- 
bout this upright intention because 
if the candidate lacks it, he will 
not only fail to receive God's very 
necessary grace of perseverance 
but will also jeopardize the salva- 
tion of his soul and bring untold 
harm to the Congregation. 

A detailed examination would go 
something like this. Ever mindful 
that we fast three times a week 
and during the whole of Advent 
and Lent beyond ordinary Church 



241 



Law, does the postulant still intend 
to assume the burden of our Rule 
with a wholehearted and intrepid 
spirit? Is he prepared to spend 
his life in solitude with no prospect 
of ever leaving it, unless by his 
Superior's command and for the 
welfare of souls? Does he know he 
must wear sandals and a rough 
woolen habit? Is the postulant will- 
ing to get up every night to chant 
matins standing and, furthermore, 
to inflict a voluntary scourging up- 
on himself three or four times a 
week? Does he realize that we 
sleep fully clothed upon a straw 
tick and have only rough woolen 
blankets? Is he prepared to dwell 
continually in a small cell and ob- 
serve rigorous silence throughout 
the entire day, except during the 
brief afternoon and evening recrea- 
tional periods? Finally, does he 
intend to adhere to all the prescrip- 
tions of obedience with childlike 
simplicity and humility even to the 
extent of welcoming the Superior's 
penances with a joyous heart? 

The examiner should also en- 
quire about the postulant's studies. 
If there are indications of a poor 
intelligence — and particularly of 
dull-wittedness or boorishness — 
the candidate must not be permit- 
ted to enter the Congregation. The 
same holds good if he is a poor 
reader or stutters since such a 
condition renders him incapable of 
fulfilling the secondary end of our 
Institute. 

Health requirements would ex- 

242 



elude from the Congregation any- 
one subject to frequent headaches,) 
stomach trouble, and chest disor- 
ders since such a person could not 
keep up the regular observance* 
Without continual dispensations, 
which are harmful to community 
life. The candidate should be askedi 
if he can eat all the ordinary kinds t 
of food without prejudice to his4 
health. If his body is crippled orj 
in any way deformed (especially! 
his face), the aspirant cannot bei 
accepted. 

The examiner should carefully, 
notice whether the candidate has ai 
joyful and lighthearted spirit; any| 
sign of melancholy would indicate i 
his ineptitude for our type of life. 
Rude and uncultured manners arei 
an indication that he would be un-< 
suited to help his neighbor because 
such habits are more than often i 
ingrained. 

In questioning the postulant a- 
bout whether he has any parents, 
brothers, or sisters living, the ex- 
aminer should be careful to ascer- 
tain if these — particularly the par- 
ents — can earn their own living; 
if not, the young man must be 
sent away. The same decision must 
be adhered to if he were ever 
clothed with the habit of another 
Order. 

The last questions put to the 
aspirant should bring out whether 
he is firmly resolved to persevere 
in the Congregation to the end of 
his life and to submit uncondition- 
ally to obedience in all things, e.g., 



dwelling-place, assignments, etc. 
The postulant must be urged to 
answer truthfully to these ques- 
tions, because if some hidden de- 
tail comes to light later on, it will 
not only bring about his dismissal 
but cause sorrow to himself and 
his parents. 

III. In the examination of pro- 
spective lay brothers special atten- 
tion should be paid to their physi- 
cal robustness and general state of 
health. Our Congregation admits 
these aspirants that they may de- 
vote themselves to manual labor, 
particularly cooking; anyone, for 
instance, who could not stand a 
continual proximity of heat would 
be unsuited for such a life. Sec- 
ondly the examiner should ascer- 
tain whether the candidates are 
meek, simple, and tractable. If 
they do not manifest such a tem- 
perament, or at least an honest 
disposition to acquire it, they had 
better not be admitted, in spite of 
their other good qualities. Later 
on such men might prove very 
troublesome. 

IV. Even after all the foregoing 
details have been attended to, it is 
not always a good policy to send a 
postulant to the novitiate at once. 
Often postulants change their mind 
after more mature deliberation, 
which indicates they sought admis- 
sion without a real vocation. In 
the event that the candidate is 
accepted, he should procure the fol- 
lowing documents before departing 
for the retreat of probation : his 



Baptismal and Confirmation cer- 
tificates, a testimonial of his good 
character, and documents showing 
him free from legal prosecution 
and unmarried. The Superiors have 
eve*y right to demand other docu- 
ments if they deem it necessary. 
The postulant is also expected to 
bring a certain sum of money to 
defray the expenses of his noviti- 
ate ; each Provincial Chapter stipu- 
lates just how much this sum is 
to be. 

V. According to Canon Law Fa- 
ther Master is the immediate, law- 
ful superior of the novices and he 
alone is responsible for their train- 
ing. Only the Higher Superiors — 
or their official representative — 
may interfere with his direction 
or training of novices, and no one 
else has any right to correct or 
penance them. The only concession 
that Canon Law grants to the 
community members in the Retreat 
of probation is to express their 
judgment about each novice's con- 
duct when his case comes up in 
Chapter, and to admit or exclude 
him from vestition or profession 
by their votes. 

VI. Our Holy Founder and the 
unbroken traditions of our prede- 
cessors have bequeathed to us the 
proper method of training our nov- 
ices. On October 24, 1746, St. Paul 
of the Cross wrote to Father Mas- 
ter as follows : 

"This should be the Master's 
biggest concern: that his pupils 
become accustomed to the practice 

243 



of solid virtue, to true humility of 
heart, to the knowledge of their 
own nothingness, to self-contempt, 
absolute obedience, the complete 
denial of their own will, and finally 
to both interior and exterior mor- 
tification of their passions, nat- 
ural desires, personal views, con- 
trary spirit, and carnal affections, 
etc. The structure of our whole 
spiritual life is founded especially 
on these fundamental virtues which 
win from God the gift of prayer 
and union with Him. If you fail to 
lay this foundation, the spiritual 
edifice undertaken will crash in 
ruins. . . . When the occasion calls 
for it, do not hesitate to make cor- 
rections or to impose penances ; 
but always do this in a spirit of 
charity, good-will, and gentleness. 

"See that the novices eat enough, 
for the devil often tempts them to 
excessive abstinence that they may 
lose their vocation. Be careful 
that they maintain strict silence 
and an exemplary modesty. By 
constant practice they should also 
acquire the habit of keeping their 
eyes cast downwards. Teach them 
external propriety in all things and 
places, i.e., while eating, walking, 
sitting, or lying in bed. Remem- 
ber that the novitiate was insti- 
tuted to form new men." 

VII. Upon such principles we 
have always grounded the educa- 
tion of our novices. During the 
novitiate, particularly as the time 
of profession draws near, the nov- 
ice is tested to see if he has a true 

244 



vocation and the dispositions requi- 
site to make him a good member 
of our Institute for years to come. 

The first sign of a good novice 
is candidness and sincerity. Any 
novice who conceals the interior 
sentiments of his heart, who dis- 
sembles or pretends, who acts in 
an underhanded way, or who con- 
ceals his faults shows very clearly 
that he is unsuited for the religious 
life. For that reason the Master 
should take account of this advice 
and warn the novices of the im- 
portance of sincerity. Lastly, Fa- 
ther Master should be on the alert 
to see whether the novices comply 
with the warnings he gives them 
during conferences or the public 
accusation of faults in the refec- 
tory, or at other times when they 
are corrected for something. 

VIII. The second sign of a good 
novice is absolute obedience in all 
things. His obedience should be 
such that the novice will not even 
take a step, utter a word, or do 
the least trifle without the Master's 
permission. The novice must de- 
pend on Father Master completely 
and be guided by him like a child. 

The novices should act with such 
a delicate conscience as to consider 
it a fault to indulge his own will 
even in the slightest matters. Fa- 
ther Master should not hesitate to 
demand from them this delicacy of 
conscience and diligence in per- 
forming both his suggestions and 
his direct orders. Furthermore, a 
warning should follow each trans- 



gression. If the fault is repeated, 
an appropriate penance should be 
forthcoming. In this way the one 
at fault learns to value the virtue 
of obedience, which is the founda- 
tion of the religious life. Such 
corrections must be given not only 
for the greater faults but also for 
the slighter ones, because, as ex- 
perience has proved, anyone who 
will not mend his tiny shortcom- 
ings certainly will not grapple with 
his greater failings. In this we see 
he is not at all suited for the 
religious life. 

The same exactitude is demand- 
ed of the novices in following the 
least prescriptions of our Holy 
Rule and the Novice's Regulations. 
Each novice should be so solicitous 
to fulfill these rules that he would 
consider himself blameworthy if 
he omitted or transgressed the 
least of them. 

To accustom them to come to 
the choir promptly upon rising 
from bed, a penance of saying three 
Pater's and Ave's with outstreched 
arms is imposed on any novice 
arriving after the second bell has 
been sounded. 

IX. The third sign of a good 
novice is detachment from persons 
and things of this world. This end 
is facilitated by not allowing the 
novice to keep anything brought 
from home, except his comb, scis- 
sors, and pen knife. Whatever is 
given him to use should be of the 
commonest kind. For detachment's 
sake the novices are sometimes 



made to exchange cells, personal 
articles, etc. 

Friends and relatives are per- 
mitted to visit the novices only on 
rare occasions, but such visits must 
be very brief and always in the 
presence of either Father Master 
or Father Vice-Master. A similar 
policy holds for letters. The only 
letters a novice should be given 
are important ones. For his part 
he must limit himself to writing 
only twice a year over and above 
what necessity demands. 

The novices may not read news- 
papers, light reading, or other dis- 
tracting matter; needless to re- 
mark, the Master should not read 
such works to them or discuss them 
in the presence of novices. The 
novices are emphatically forbidden 
to converse about worldly affairs, 
their parents, their country, etc. 
In short they are to banish all dis- 
tracting thoughts. 

X. The fourth sign of a good 
novice is his strict observance of 
silence. To make it all the more 
easier for the novices to gain such 
a habit, the novitiate must be a 
house of solitude unfrequented by 
lay persons, even for devout pur- 
poses. Every novice is strictly for- 
bidden to speak with or answer 
anybody, even the religious them- 
selves. They may, of course, brief- 
ly answer the local Superior should 
ho ask them something, but the 
Superior should prudently beware 

of giving the novices an excuse for 
talking. The same rule of strict 

246 



silence must be observed regard- 
ing the novices conversing among 
themselves. Each novice may speak 
only with the companion assigned 
him by Father Master, and then 
only during the prescribed times. 

The novice-brothers must be 
particularly careful in this respect, 
because their manual labor both in 
the kitchen and in the garden regu- 
larly offers them pretexts for 
breaking silence. While they are 
performing their duties about the 
house, the novice-brothers may nev- 
er converse among themselves. In 
case of need, however, they may 
talk with the professed brother in 
charge of them. 

Father Master should take the 
greatest care to see that the nov- 
ices acquire this virtue of silence, 
which plays such an important part 
in the observance of our Rule. So 
exact should he be on this point 
that not even the least word spoken 
without his permission should go 
unpunished. 

XI. The fifth sign of a good 
novice is an exemplary modesty 
both in dress and bearing. By 
practicing this virtue the novices 
come to display a proper serious- 
ness and religious decorum at all 
times. That is why the Master of 
Novices should teach them to walk 
correctly, to carry themselves prop- 
erly, to speak in subdued tones, 
and to avoid all buffoonery and 
joking. Above all, the novices 
should grow accustomed to guard- 



ing their eyes; therefore they 
should always keep them fixed oni 
the ground, especially when other 
people are present. If a novice i 
should see someone else's face, hei 
should account it a fault. 

XII. The sixth and last sign of 
a good novice is humility. It is 
Father Master's duty to exercise 
each one in acts of humility and 
never to overlook any negligence, 
disobedience, or other fault with- 
out administering an adequate cor- 
rection. If he perceives a novice 
is prone to vanity and pride, Fa- 
ther Master would not be amiss if 
he occasionally made overmuch of 
such a one's slight failings just 
to humble him. 

The novices customarily make 
culpa in the refectory twice a week 
— either at noon or in the evening 
(cf. Nov. Reg., par. 45) — and also 
whenever they commit a fault a- 
gainst our Rules, Regulations, or 
obedience. When a novice makes 
culpa for coming late to the choir, 
he must wear a folded blanket over 
his shoulder besides carrying the 
cross. When a novice fails to mem- 
orize his lessons, breaks anything, 
or fails to sound the rattle at the 
proper time, he should wear sus- 
pended from his neck a book, a 
piece of the broken object, or the 
rattle — depending on what his of- 
fense is. 

XIII. Over and above our usual 
penitential practices the novices 
are accustomed to kiss the feet of 



246 



the professed religious or their fel- 
low novices in the refectory, to beg 
from the priests some small pieces 
of bread as an alms, to eat sitting 
on the floor, to serve at table, to 
wash the dishes, to abstain from 
some beverage or food, and to per- 
form other similar practices. Often 
they are chided, reproached, and 
embarrassed, especially when there 
is doubt about the sincerity of their 
vocation ; this invariably covers 
them with confusion. However, the 
Master should be careful to do all 
this charitably and prudently with- 
out overstepping the limits of pro- 
priety; stooping to ridicule or 
harsh threats only provokes smiles 
and disturbs discipline both in the 
refectory and elsewhere. 

Among other penances any nov- 
ice who fails habitually in the cus- 
tody of his eyes is blindfolded 
awhile ; this penance, however, 
must not be inflicted when lay peo- 
ple are about. Another novitiate 
custom calls for a penance when a 
novice blunders in reciting an e- 
jaculation or a "letter" from the 
Monk's Alphabet, fails to call the 
Presence of God at the right time, 
or excuses himself when repre- 
hended by the Master or Vice- 
Master. 

XIV. The horarium of the novi- 
tiate is generally as follows. In 
the morning after mental prayer 
the novices assemble in the Chap- 
ter room where Father Master en- 
quires how each made his prayer 



and points out the proper methods 
to be followed. Sometimes he may 
explain some section either of our 
Holy Rule or our Regulations. In 
any event he should always take 
advantage of the occasion to spur 
them on in the path of virtue. As 
we mentioned elsewhere (cf. Mas- 
ter of Novices, par. VII), Father 
Vice-Master conducts Chapter on 
appointed days. Chapter is usually 
over in about a half-hour. The 
novices take a few moments out to 
wash themselves and then go to 
breakfast, which Father Vice-Mas- 
ter has prepared beforehand. 

After breakfast they all enter 
upon the regular order of the day 
by each one tidying up his cell 
(unless of course this was done 
immediately after Chapter). For 
a half-hour the novices study the 
New Testament; they are supposed 
to memorize the assigned passages 
and draw some practical moral. 
When the novices' bell rings, they 
go to class. Father Master listens 
to their recitation of the lesson 
and to the morals they drew from 
it. 

After class the novices return to 
their cells for half an hour's spir- 
itual reading. On Wednesdays and 
Fridays spiritual reading should 
be devoted to the Passion of Our 
Lord, on Saturdays to our Blessed 
Mother, on Sundays to some saint's 
life, and on all other days to asceti- 
cal works. 

The novices' bell rings at the 



247 



end of spiritual reading, and for 
another half-hour the novices take 
care of their manual offices. If 
anyone finishes his office in less 
than half an hour, he should spend 
the rest of the time in his cell. 
If he does not finish in time, he 
ought to ask permission to con- 
tinue. After office time each one 
should brush his habit. 

When the bell sounds once more, 
everyone assembles in choir for the 
last mass. Wherever it is not cus- 
tomary to have this mass, the 
novices spend this time in choir 
until Sext and None, performing 
whatever devotions the Master 
deems best. If the last mass is 
celebrated at an earlier time than 
prescribed above, the horarium is 
so changed as to allot enough time 
for all the aforementioned duties. 

XV. After dinner the novices go 
to the recreation room. If both the 
Master and the Vice-Master are 
absent, the novices must remain 
silent. When either of these does 
come, the novice whose turn it is 
to deliver the sentiment asks bene- 
dicite to do so ; after the sentiment 
each one may discuss spiritual 
topics with the companion assigned 
him. Father Master usually assigns 
the novices some light tasks during 
recreation, e.g., making rosaries, 
disciplines, signs, etc. 

When the clock strikes the quar- 
ter-hour, the novice appointed calls 
the Presence of God. All rise and 
remove their berrettinos. Then the 



cleric who is appointed to recite! 
the letter of the Monk's Alphabet 
asks benedicite to do so. When 
the clock strikes fifteen minutes 
later, the same procedure takes 
place, and a second cleric asks per- 
mission to recite the ejaculation. 
Sentiment, the letter, and the ejac- 
ulation are also given at the eve- 
ning recreation. 

On stated days a novice asksf 
benedicite at this time to change 
the order of manual duties listed 
on the table of offices. This table is 
posted in the recreation room and] 
on it are listed the novices' as-! 
signments. In one column of the 1 
table are numbers signifying the 
individual novices. In an adjacent 
column are listed the various du- 
ties. Each novices takes the tasks 
or offices indicated by his number 
for the following day or week. 

XVI. A clock which strikes 
slightly ahead of the community 
clock is usually kept in the noviti- 
ate enclosure. Thus the cleric ap- 
pointed to ring the community bell 
and the brother appointed to ring 
the tower bell will both be on hand 
to do so as soon as the community 
clock strikes. 

After Vespers and the public 
spiritual reading Father Master 
gives the customary signal, and the 
novices assemble at the appointed 
place for recitation of the rosary, 
as our Rule requires (par. 51). In 
certain retreats the rosary proces- 
sion begins in the choir and ends 



248 



before some novitiate shrine. The 
novices proceed two by two, and 
one of them carries a standard of 
the Blessed Virgin at the head of 
the procession. Either Father Mas- 
ter or Father Vice-Master accom- 
panies the group. 

When rosary is over, each one 
retires to his cell to arrange his 
bed. After some five or six minutes 
the novice devotes himself to study- 
ing his Latin catechism. A half- 
hour class follows wherein the 
matter covered is explained. At the 
end of class the novices return to 
their cells for half an hour's spir- 
itual reading as in the morning. 

XVII. Forty-five minutes before 
Compline the novices gather in 
choir for adoration of the Blessed 
Sacrament. Then after invoking 
the protection of the holy angels 
they go outside to walk and con- 
verse among themselves. Usually 
they remain within the monastery 
property except on days of the 
common walk. When it is time to 
ring the community bell for eve- 
ning walk, the cleric appointed to 
do so should get permission suffi- 
ciently beforehand. The same holds 
good for ringing the first and sec- 
ond bell for Compline. 

At the second bell for Compline 
all return to the retreat. After 
putting away their hats they should 
all go to the choir and prepare 
their breviaries or meditation 
books. The novice in charge of the 



choir should see to it that the 
lecterns are dusted. 

After supper all go to the recrea- 
tion room as they did after dinner. 
Five minutes before rosary time 
the cleric appointed calls the Pres- 
ence of God. Everyone kneels and 
sings the hymn Lodato intoned by 
Father Master. After the hymn 
all together ask Father Master's 
blessing to receive Holy Commun- 
ion the next morning. 

Then the novices go to the pro- 
fessed recreation to hear the Supe- 
rior's sentiment after which they 
accompany the rest of the com- 
munity to the choir for the evening 
rosary. When night prayers are 
over, Father Master gives the cus- 
tomary signal, and all the novices 
return to the novitiate for the 
nocturnal repose. 

XVIII. During the year of no- 
vitiate each novice should become 
fairly acquainted with all the of- 
fices ordinarily done by our clerics. 
An office is usually kept for at 
least two months. 

The Master must act with the 
greatest precaution should the nov- 
ices be asked to sing with some 
choral group or to play the organ, 
although he may allow them to 
sing hymns during recreation to 
lighten their spirits. Only on very 
rare occasions are the novices to 
be treated with candy and refresh- 
ments. Whenever there is a general 
recreation for all, the novices 
should keep to themselves and not 



249 



converse with any of the professed 
religious unless Father Master is 
present. 

In short it is a time honored 
custom to shield the novices as far 
as possible from anything that 
would tend to lower their spirit of 
recollection and mortification to 
which our Holy Rule demands that 
they be dedicated during their year 
of trial. To facilitate acquiring 
this spirit a newly arrived postu- 
lant is ordinarily assigned for his 
companion a novice of solid virtue 
from whom he can learn our cus- 
toms and imbibe sound principles 
of conduct. 

XIX. Five or six days after his 
arrival at the retreat of probation 
(cf. Rule, par. 30) let the postu- 
lant begin the daily practice of the 
mortifications prescribed by our 
Holy Rule. For example, let him 
serve at table, eat sitting on the 
floor, wash the dishes, sweep floors, 
make culpa, and such like. If he 
submits to all this and receives a 
favorable vote from the local 
Chapter, the postulant then goes 
on retreat. 

On the night before he is vested 
the postulant makes culpa in the 
refectory to the local Superior, and 
at the end of the usual formula he 
asks permission to receive the holy 
habit. The newly vested novice 
does the same thing the evening he 
receives the habit, only this time 
he thanks the Superior for admit- 
ting him. 



As profession draws near, the 
Master should see that each novice 
is well-instructed in our Holy Rule 
and Regulations and about the ob- 
ligations of religious profession, 
the vows, and the oath of persever- 
ance. This is why every novice 
must also receive private instruc- 
tion over and above that given 
generally throughout the year in 
Chapter. This is particularly nec- 
essary for the novice-brothers who 
may occasionally prove a bit slower 
in learning. 

On the day before profession 
Father Master must have each 
novice sign legal documents re- 
nouncing the usufruct of his per- 
sonal property and waiving all re- 
muneration for his work in the 
Congregation. Each novice must 
also make his will. After profes- 
sion the newly professed novice, 
the priest delegated to officiate at 
the ceremony, and two witnesses 
must sign a formal declaration tes- 
tifying to the reception. 

There is no investigation to be 
made about the act of renuncia- 
tion, as it is considered wisest for 
the Superior to allow the novice 
the greatest liberty in disposing 
his private property. A prudent 
Superior, moreover, will not per- 
mit a novice to make the Congre- 
gation the beneficiary of his will 
if thereby the Congregation would 
in any way be obligated. 

XX. In the event of the novice 
returning to secular life whatever 



250 



he brought with him should be re- 
stored. If he stayed at the retreat 
for only a few days, all his money 
ought to be returned ; however, if 
he lodged there for about two 
weeks or so, a slight sum might 
be retained to compensate in some 
small way for the expenses he en- 
tailed. When a novice leaves us 
after quite awhile, a fourth a 
third, or even a half of his entrance 
fee may be appropriated to cover 
the usual expenditures involved. 
Everything, however, is left to the 
discretion of the local Superior. 

The newly professed novice 
ought to receive a new habit and 
mantle (unless he already received 
them at his vestition), a set of 
breviaries, a hat, the customary 
profession crucifix, and one or two 
woolen under-tunics (Cf. Rule, par. 
16; Reg., par. 46, 116, 261). He is 
also supposed to get a new pair 



of sandals and a second pair from 
the first retreat he is sent to after 
profession. 

XXI. Should one of the newly 
professed be a priest, he is gener- 
ally sent immediately to a house of 
formal study. He is to associate 
with the students in all things ex- 
cept studies, though privately he 
is to prepare himself for an ex- 
amination in dogmatic and moral 
theology. In all this of course let 
him adhere to the unshaken doc- 
trine of the Angelic Doctor accord- 
ing to paragraph 177 of our Holy 
Rule. After his examination he is 
to prepare for the missions under 
the direction of an able missionary. 
Such a preparation usually takes 
about two or three years. 

Throughout his novitiate a 
priest-novice always retains his 
biretta and ranks in deanship a- 
head of all the other novices. 



"Those whom God the Father has predestinated to be conformed to 
His Divine Son in glory, He wishes first to be predestinated to be con- 
formed to Him in poverty and the Cross, and this is the greatest motive 
we have for confidence. . . ." 

St. Paul of the Cross, Letters, Vol. I, p. 555. 



251 



Honor to St. Paul 



(©ratio 9 Ctmctts 



I N an attempt to clear up some 
■ of the confusion existing re- 
garding the prayer A Cunctis, the 
following study is submitted. It 
is drawn from such authentic 
sources as the rubrics of the Missal 
and Breviary, Decrees of the Sa- 
cred Congregation of Rites and ap- 
proved liturgical authors. 

Since the rubrics of the Missal 
should be the point of departure 
in any such study as this, we shall 
begin by quoting what is said 
there. Using this as a foundation, 
we shall then proceed to clear up 
the difficulties that arise. In the 
Missal we find the following rubric 
after the prayer A Cunctis: 

"In the foregoing prayer A 
Cunctis, as also in its postcom- 
munion, at the letter N. is ex- 
pressed the name of the Titular 
Saint of the Church, provided 
the Titular is not a divine person 
or a mystery of our Lord, or the 
Mass of the Titular is not said, 
or a commemoration of it is not 
made or its name is not already 
mentioned in the same prayer A 
Cunctis; the names of the holy 
Angels however, and of St. John 
the Baptist, if they be Titulars, 
are placed before the name of St. 
Joseph. In all these cases more- 
over, the words atque beato N. 



are omitted. But if the Mass or 
a commemoration be of St. Jo- 
seph or of the holy Apostles 
Peter and Paul, then in this ora- 
tion and in the postcommunion, 
those words that refer to them 
are omitted." (Missal, Orationes 
Diversae). The rubric of the 
Breviary is substantially the 
same. 

For ordinary circumstances this 
rubric is all sufficient. But when 
it is applied to our particular case 
we are confronted with difficulties. 
The first arises from the fact that 
we chant the divine office and say 
Mass in chapels separate from the 
Church. When the practical ques- 
tion arises as to whether in our 
choirs and chapels we should men- 
tion in the prayer A Cunctis the 
name or the names of the Titular 
Saints of the churches which are 
attached to our Retreats. Let us 
solve this difficulty before going 
on to a more knotty problem deal- 
ing with the mentioning of the 
name of our Holy Founder in the 
same Oration. 

The rubric just quoted says ab- 
solutely that the Titular Saint of 
a church should be mentioned in 
the prayer A Cunctis. Therefore 
in our churches proper it is certain 
that the name of the Titular must 



252 



be mentioned if it is possible ac- 
cording to the Rubrics. Thus for 
example, the name of St. Agnes 
should be mentioned in St. Agnes 
Church in Louisville. But should 
her name be mentioned in the choir 
and chapels of Sacred Heart Re- 
treat? The rubric itself gives us 
nothing regarding this particular 
circumstance. However, the De- 
crees of the Sacred Congregation 
of Rites do throw some light on 
the subject. Among the Decreta 
Authentica C.S.R. we find one 
which gives a parallel case. The 
decree is as follows: 

Dubium viii — Since the church 
of the aforesaid Seminary has 
for its Titular Saint, St. Ignatius 
of Loyola, should the name of 
this Saint be mentioned in the 
prayer A Cunctis in place of the 
name of the patron of the lo- 
cality, in Masses celebrated in 
the interior Oratory of the Sem- 
inary ? 

Resp. — In the private oratory 
of this Seminary, the name of 
the Titular of the Church of the 
same Seminary should be men- 
tioned in the prayer A Cunctis. 
(Decree 3804 ad viii.) 

Thus in the light of this decree 
it would seem certain that in our 
choirs and chapels we should men- 
tion the name of the Titular Saint 
of the monastery church attached, 
if that is possible according to the 
general rubric of the Missal. 



Note: Objection may be made 
to the terminology used in the 
above decree, for it speaks of a 
private oratory in a seminary, 
whereas in present day liturgical 
terminology a private oratory 
can be had only in the home of 
a family properly so called (cf. 
canon 1188). However, we must 
note that this decree came out in 
1893 and at that time a private 
oratory was the equivalent of 
what we now call a semi-public 
oratory. Smith, in Compendium 
Juris Canonici which was pub- 
lished in 1892 and therefore deals 
with the old law, distinguishes 
private oratories into three class- 
es: a) Episcopal, which are had 
in the residences of Bishops, b) 
religious or pious (v.g., monas- 
teries, hospitals, etc.) and c) 
domestic, which are those of pri- 
vate houses properly so called. 
It is obvious that the Seminary 
in question would belong to class 
b), and such oratories today are 
called semi-public. (Op. cit. p. 
304.) 

It will be well to mention here 
also that there can be no ques- 
tion of mentioning the Titular 
Saint of our choirs in the A 
Cunctis. For a chapel to enjoy 
that prerogative it is necessary 
that it be consecrated or at least 
solemnly blessed. Our choirs, as 
a rule, are not so blessed. (Cf. 
Decreta Authentica C.S.R., no. 
3752 ad 1). 



253 



Now let us take up the second 
and more difficult problem as to 
the mentioning of the name of our 
Holy Founder in the A Cunctis. 
First of all, should his name be 
mentioned at all? Decree 3758 of 
the Sacred Congregation of Rites 
declares : 

"Regulars may (in the Mass) 
at the letter N. of the prayer A 
Cunctis name their holy Found- 
er, so long as they do not omit 
the Titular (if it can be men- 
tioned) ; saving however the or- 
der of dignity prescribed in the 
rubrics." Dec. 2, 1891. 

Note: Before we go on to the 
discussion of the main point of 
the decree, it will be well to call 
attention to the fact that the 
name of the Titular Saint must 
not be omitted, even if the holy 
Founder is named. 

The decree just quoted grants 
the privilege of mentioning the 
name of their Founders to regu- 
lars. Now canon 488, 7 designates 
regulars as those only who belong 
to an Order, whereas those who 
belong to Congregations are termed 
Religious with simple vows. This 
terminology of the new Code of 
course post-dates the decree in 
question, but that does not affect 
the case because these terms were 
not changed in the new Code. 

We must conclude from this that 
this decree does not strictly apply 
to us, so that it is not sufficient to 
justify our mentioning of our Holy 



Founder in the A Cunctis. How is< 
it then that we do mention it? 
The answer is that we have a 
special privilege to do so. It is 
true that the latest privilege book 
does not mention it, and in the in- 
troduction to this privilege book it 
is declared that only those privi- 
leges mentioned therein may be 
used by our religious. When the 
privilege book was issued however, 
it was noticed by some of our re- 
ligious that this one was not con- 
tained, whereupon a question was 
put to Father General as to the 
status of this privilege. The an- 
swer came back that although this 
privilege was not mentioned, yet 
it was entirely proper to continue 
to make use of it. 

We have said that this is a 
privilege. What then is the obliga- 
tion to make use of it? Canonists 
distinguish between certain privi- 
leges as to their binding force. 
They say that a common privilege 
given for the common good may 
not be renounced by the individual. 
A private privilege granted to the 
community for the good of the in- 
dividuals of a community likewise 
may not be renounced by the in- 
dividuals of that community. 
Though the individuals are not per 
se bound to make use of such a 
privilege, still they are bound to 
do so for other reasons, v.g., for 
the sake of uniformity. It is only 
a private privilege granted for the 
private good that an individual 



254 



may renounce. The case in ques- 
tion is certainly not a private privi- 
lege granted for the private good. 
It is not really necessary to deter- 
mine whether it is a common one 
for the common good, or a private 
one granted to the community for 
the good of the individuals. In the 
first instance the individuals would 
certainly be obliged to use it. In 
the second also, at least for the 
sake of uniformity. 

Our conclusion is that we cer- 
tainly have a privilege to mention 
the name of St. Paul of the Cross 
in the A Cunctis. Further, it would 
seem that we are obliged as in- 
dividuals to make use of this privi- 
lege. By way of corroboration we 
might add that all other religious 
orders who have this privilege do 
make use of it. And those of our 
Fathers who have been in Rome 
tell us that it is always done there, 
and that in the very presence of 
Father General. 

It is worthy of note also that 
this is not a local privilege but a 
personal one, so that it is not lim- 
ited to our own churches and ora- 
tories. Wherever we say Mass or 
recite the divine office we should 
make use of it. 

As for the wording to be used 
in mentioning our holy Founder's 
name — in the same reply of Father 
General regarding the status of 
the privilege, he declared that the 
following words should be used: 
"atque beato patre nostro Paulo." 



And this is the way it is done in 
Rome. (Cf. C.P. Ordo, introduc- 
tory matter, under the heading 
Oratio A Cunctis) 

From the above we see that 1) 
We must mention the name of the 
Titular Saint of our monastery 
churches in the A Cunctis, even 
when we say Mass or the office in 
the interior chapels of our Retreats. 
2) We have a privilege (which we 
as individuals may not renounce) 
of mentioning the name of our 
holy Founder in the same prayer. 
Now we ask, ''What order is to be 
observed in mentioning these 
names when there are two or 
more?" Decree 3758 quoted above 
gives us the answer: "saving the 
order prescribed in the rubrics." 
Another decree (4055 ad 2) makes 
this more definite by saying that 
the order of the litany should be 
followed. This order is as follows : 
the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Holy 
Angels, St. John the Baptist, St. 
Joseph, Patriarchs, Prophets, A- 
postles, Martyrs, Confessors, Vir- 
gins and non Virgins. For exam- 
ple St. Paul of the Cross should 
be mentioned before a Virgin, v.g., 
St. Agnes. If the Titular be a 
Martyr, then the name of St. Paul 
should be mentioned after his. If 
he be a Confessor Bishop, his name 
likewise should be mentioned be- 
fore that of our holy Founder. If 
the Titular be a simple Confessor, 
that is, on the same level of dig- 
nity, then our holy Founder would 



255 



precede by reason of his being our 
Founder. We submit the following 
examples by way of illustration : 

1) In St. Francis de Hieronomo 
Church : "... et intercedente beata 
et gloriosa semper Virgine Dei 
Genitrice Maria, cum beato Joseph, 
beatis Apostolis tuis Petro et 
Paulo, beato patre nostro Paulo at- 
que beato Francisco et omnibus 
Sanctis etc." 

2) St. Michael's Church: ". . . et 
intercedente beata et gloriosa sem- 
per Virgine Dei Genitrice Maria, 
cum beato Michaele, beato Joseph, 
beatis Apostolis tuis Petro et Paulo 
atque beato Patre nostro Paulo et 
omnibus Sanctis etc." 

3) St. Agnes Church: ". . . et 
intercedente beata et gloriosa sem- 



per Virgine Dei Genitrice Maria, 
cum beato Joseph, beatis Apostolis 
tuis Petro et Paulo, beato Patre 
nostro Paulo, atque beata Agnete 
et omnibus Sanctis etc." 

4) In churches dedicated to our 
Blessed Mother under whatever ti- 
tle, to St.. Joseph or to Sts. Peter 
and Paul, the prayer should remain 
as it stands, with the simple addi- 
tion of "atque beato patre nostro 
Paulo," because these names are 
already mentioned. 

Confusing as the letter N. in the 
A Cunctis can be at times, it really 
becomes very simple once the fun- 
damental principles governing it 
are grasped. It is hoped that these 
pages have thrown at least some 
light on the subject. 



Vx. ColumUn. C.<P 




256 



7L 
Missionary 

FORUM 

• IDEALS 

• TRADITIONS 

• TECHNIQUES 

• LETTERS 

• EXAMPLES 

• SUGGESTIONS 







WHEREON TO STAND 



CT PAUL exhorting the Ephe- 
sians to strengthened unity in 
the Mystical Body, enumerates 
types of authorized leaders desig- 
nated by the Savior to promote 
the "building up of the body of 
Christ, until we all attain to the 
unity of faith and of the deep 
knowledge of the Son of God, to 
perfect manhood, to the mature 



measure of the fullness of Christ." 
(4,12). The Master "gave some 
men as apostles, and some as 
prophets, others again as evan- 
gelists, and others as pastors and 
teachers." (Ibid). It follows that 
every consecrated priest, no matter 
his technical assignment, becomes 
a recognized participant in coor- 
dinating the unity and strength of 

257 



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Christ's Church. The commission 
is comprehensive. The assignment 
by competent authority narrows 
within specified limits, the outlet 
for individual zeal. This becomes 
a mandate for order, efficiency, and 
cumulative effort to promote the 
kingdom of God upon earth. A 
gracious Father has left to us the 
selection of that branch of apos- 
tolic service wherein, by supernat- 
ural attraction and native talent 
we regard ourselves as best qual- 
ified to serve. He hints to us His 
Will in what we choose to call a 
vocation. 

The wide range and varied needs 
calling for spiritual ingenuity as 
well as calculated human measure- 
ments present a mammoth mosaic 
in the making, in order to give us 
the masterpiece, "the perfect man," 
and "the mature measure of the 
fullness of Christ." 

SPECIALISTS 

Quite obviously, there is call for 
specialists, experts in all depart- 
ments. Thus, we come by the great 
doctors of the Church, theologians 
of merit, capable and instructive 
writers, educators of the student 
body, preachers to compel notice of 
God's law, and a host of lesser 
lights directing apostolic action. 
The vagaries of erring man need 
physicians to diagnose and pre- 
scribe. Fallible rationalizing by 
surcharged proud minds, demand 



watchers on the towers to detect 
dangers and warn wayfarers. Then 
too, God-inspired adventurers to 
open new channels of activity, to 
drive into the densities of moral 
jungles to recover entangled vic- 
tims. It becomes a glorious work 
of divine and human strategy, this 
out-guessing and out-maneuvering 
the party of the opposition. 

Every age harbors its rescuers of 
souls. In every lifetime we note 
men of vision, courage, grace, man- 
ning the ramparts. In more recent 
generations a Don Bosco leads his 
cohorts to reclaim endangered 
youth, a Bishop James Anthony 
Walsh takes his battalions into the 
uncharted reaches of pagan lands, 
and into abandoned territory where 
once Christianity ruled. We come 
upon Abbe Godin struggling with 
the proletariat of de-christianized 
France, a Cardijn harnessing the 
enthusiasm of zealous young men 
and women to serve the mission of 
Christ. And, should we look for 
the master of all, the very syn- 
thesis of apostolic spirit in this en- 
feebled age, we have the present 
Holy Father, Pope Pius XII. 

Modern approach to life's con- 
fusions begets an enthusiasm to 
join in the battle. Risking cautious 
procedure, the impulse is strong to 
grasp the crusader's banner and 
rush the enemy, justifying one's 
campaign under the challenge writ- 
ten thereon, "God wills it." In- 



258 



FORUM 



deed, the various outlets of the 
apostolate today becomes so in- 
triguing, that youthful priestly zeal 
may urge a breaking of ranks that 
one may go out, and on his own, 
pursue the pressing need. To how 
many, already set within an organ- 
ization with definite mission, does 
not association with another's vo- 
cational activity appeal? One would 
become a professor, another would 
dream of the laboratory of the 
spiritual researcher, where he 
could study and write. The field 
of journalism or pamphleteering 
beckons to yet another. Re-habili- 
tating family life through Cana 
Conferences and kindred methods 
seems most inviting. Youth with 
its problems would appeal to zeal- 
ous men so attuned. And on and 
on we could go. Truly, the pastures 
over the way always seem more 
fertile and inviting. 

OUR "SPECIALIZATION" AS 
WE UNDERSTAND IT 

What I would emphasize is this. 
A danger and a warning. Our 
young priests imbued with com- 
mendable apostolic zeal could be 
caught up in the surge of active 
apostolates, seeking to explore new 
fields, or rather, to uncover in fal- 
lowed and neglected patches an im- 
mensely productive soil, wherein, 
by the application of a new tech- 
nique the harvest could be so abun- 
dant. With focus upon one or oth- 



er phase of priestly endeavor car- 
rying with it a forceful appeal, it 
could be that their bounden duty, 
already established, becomes mo- 
notonous, commonplace. Even 
might they argue to the point of 
personal conviction, that mission 
work as we understand it, is out- 
moded, a reactionary approach to 
the burning needs of the Church 
this day. 

Unfortunately for us, there has 
not been a proper stimulation to 
enhance the ideals, the possibili- 
ties, the motives, the objectives, 
and Christlike action of him who 
goes before the people, a commis- 
sioned missioner. The mechanics 
of the trade are duly taught, and, 
given a kit of mediocre sermons, 
with perhaps a flair for preaching, 
the young missioner is from there 
out, on his own. As we know, in- 
spiration is mostly from without. 
The less imaginative fall easy prey 
to monotonous grind. So, let us do 
something else. 

Our lectors are technically 
trained and kept abreast of current 
pedagogical progress. Opportuni- 
ties to enlarge upon their equip- 
ment is prodigally bestowed. The 
missioner is left to fend for him- 
self. Should he qualify by dint of 
constant application, he is num- 
bered among the elect. Others just 
sit and grow melancholy. Father 
Maurice remarked in the course of 
his sermon at the Missionary Con- 



259 



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ference in 1945: "With regard to 
our young men and their chance, 
let us not take for granted, 'All is 
well, our young men are doing won- 
derful work, much work, big work. 
Things will take care of themselves 
with time.' Things do not take care 
of themselves, and the only effect 
of time on the things of time is, 
first to make them grow, then ma- 
ture, and then decay and die. As 
the Bard of Avon said long ago: 
'And so we ripe and ripe, and rot 
and rot.' " 

A feeble attempt to inject new 
life and spirit into our corps of 
missioners was undertaken by the 
Missionary Conference, held in the 
summer of 1945. Stimulation came 
to the few chosen delegates who 
were privileged to engage in dis- 
cussion. The program was never 
implemented nor formulated into a 
readable report. Their colleagues 
were vouchsafed only faint echoes 
as the delegates were minded to 
relate the happenings within. The 
Mission Forum of The Passionist 
did give us a resume of resolutions 
and recommendations. And thus is 
buried forever the work of honest 
and sincere men. 

It would seem that missionary 
apprenticeship is unconsidered. 
One's value is measured by the ser- 
mon stack and ability to orate. Who 
is there to advise, encourage, and 
check with the aspiring young 
priest? Indeed, the criticism lev- 



eled at him who would venture into 
personal activities on his own, 
"specialized work," should be tem- 
pered by the thought that his de- 
velopment as a missioner has been 
neglected. One wonders at times, 
at just what level of proficiency 
do we set the ideal for our mis- 
sioners. 

God bless and prosper the mod- 
ern men of God who in their de- 
voted service for souls, meet new 
problems with new methods. Men, 
otherwise unattached and author- 
ized to prosecute their work un- 
hampered by previous obligation. 
In the same breath would I add : 
God bless the good St. Paul of the 
Cross, who in his day attracted 
and reclaimed souls by the force of 
his unchallenged method. His heri- 
tage comes to us. In this our day 
it is in constant demand. If only 
we interpret him by closely adher- 
ing to his technique. 

IS THE MISSION 
ON THE WAY OUT? 

Specialists in their chosen field 
have a tendency to exaggerate the 
defects and minimize the virtues 
of a program not within their cher- 
ished dream. Thus we encounter 
criticism of the old standard mis- 
sion method used the world over 
to bring souls back to God. We 
are chided for rigid formality, 
platitudinous treatment of escha- 
talogical doctrine, harsh, even 



260 



FORUM 



crude castigation of sin. Ours is 
an antiquated approach, we are 
told. Rather, should we popularize 
the Church's teaching, lead by 
kindly light, soften the divine dia- 
tribes lest we give pain to con- 
sciences so easily wounded. Others 
would have us soar into higher 
reaches of dialectics after the man- 
ner of forum discussion. There 
should be an academic atmosphere 
pervading the mission, the sermons 
to take a cultural turn, and so on. 

One Rev. H. A. Reinhold, a litur- 
gist of pretension, in an article in 
the Commonweal (Sept. 12, 1947), 
delivered himself of the following 
appraisement together with some 
sever strictures of the great Orders 
engaged in mission work: "Why is 
there not more variety in missions 
given by the different religious? 
. . . The Church has not only a tre- 
mendous wealth of habits and or- 
ganizations to offer. She has not 
collected religious orders in a sort 
of fit of absent-mindedness as the 
British Empire collected terri- 
tories. Nor has she all these vari- 
ous orders because she never got 
around to mould them into one. 
In most of them a definite histori- 
cal period of great merit, beauty 
and significance with its specific 
spirituality lives on. . . . But with 
such definite and diverse spirituali- 
ties preserved among us, is it really 
so immaterial to what order the 
missionary belongs who comes to 



my parish? No pastor wants a 
Dominican, for instance, to come 
in and tell his parish that there is 
only one way of being a Catholic, 
and that this is the one manifested 
by a priest in white habit and 
black cowl. In order to be tactful, 
however, the Dominican may offer 
a mission that has none of the 
Dominican flavor at all. But then a 
Jesuit could preach it. A more 
beautiful and picturesque habit, 
and a constant reference to the ro- 
sary, might be the only difference. 
I for my part think this is wrong. 

"It is not enough to let the peo- 
ple see that the monk is a regular 
fellow — a good speaker, orthodox 
in doctrine, and not too different 
from Joe Doakes in spite of his 
white, or brown, or black habit! 
The people are so impoverished 
spiritually, our spiritual fare is so 
diluted, has such a common flavor, 
that our souls are in danger of 
losing all their colorful individuali- 
ty. With our stupid idea that we 
have a 'all-in-one' spirituality we 
are nothing but shallow, typically 
modern and conceited progressiv- 
ists with no perspective, and no 
real sense of tradition." 

Thus, the major of his syllogis- 
tic proposition. Spiritual variety 
is the word! Now for the minor. 
To continue: "When a Benedictine 
preaches a mission he should with- 
out show of bookish vanity, give 
my people and me the eternal 



261 



FORUM 



truths in the light of the Fathers, 
of the 'parousia', God's glory and 
majesty, of St. Benedict's rule and 
monastic history. 

"When I invite a Franciscan, I 
expect at his departure that my 
people will have a greater love of 
the poor, a greater understanding 
of Lady Poverty, a deep affection 
for St. Francis, an idea of what 
seraphic holiness is, a heart alive 
with our Lord's 'Humanity', and 
a new preference for St. Francis' 
canticle to Brother Sun. 

"When my Dominican departs, 
he should not only leave a more 
varied, intelligent, and 'internal- 
ized' way of saying the Rosary, but 
above all, my people should have a 
new consciousness that the Domini- 
cans stand for 'Veritas', the pri- 
macy of the 'logos' over the 'Ethos', 
and a profounder understanding of 
the Church as a Sacramental body, 
and of the world as a cosmos of 
Divine Wisdom . . . And many more 
things that make the further ex- 
istence of the Order of Preachers 
more important than just being 
white clad relics of the past! 

"When I invite a Jesuit to be 
Christ's forerunner in my parish- 
ioners' souls, I don't want just a 
well trained member of a strongly 
disciplined and powerful organiza- 
tion with a common run of spiritu- 
ality, living forever on a capital 
built during tertianship and peri- 
odically embellished with new anec- 



dotes or reference to current e- 
vents, but strong Ignatian stuff 
whose spark set men like Xavier 
and Francis Borgia afire!" 

At long last, we have found the 
magnetic lodestone! Why have we 
complained these weary years over 
the indifference of Catholics? Why 
the frightening leakage within the 
Church in our day? Why have 
pastors bemoaned vagrant ways in 
their youth and the disruption of 
homes? Why? Because the mis- 
sionaries have woefully neglected 
their job! The pity that our Do- 
minican confreres have betrayed 
the fallen-aways because of neglect 
to create a new consciousness with- 
in them that the sons of St. Dom- 
inic stand foursquare for "Veri- 
tas"; that it is a must with them, 
to uphold the primacy of the "lo- 
gos" over the "Ethos"; that they 
did not see to it that the recitation 
of the rosary became more "inter- 
nalized"; that they should be de- 
prived of that profounder under- 
standing of the Church as a Sac- 
ramental body, and our old work- 
a-day world the cosmos of Divine 
Wisdom! The Benedictine mission- 
ary must examine his conscience 
and not delinquency as he failed 
these poor people. They must lan- 
guish for lack of the light of the 
"parousia" in their appreciation of 
God's glory and majesty. And the 
poor Franciscan man of God must 
humbly confess his neglect to es- 



262 



FORUM 



tablish that new perference for St. 
Francis' canticle to Brother Sun! 
Bosh! Anyhow, what is a mission 
intended to accomplish? God help 
the Passionist missioner with his 
simple appeal to the Crucified, 
should be come within the observa- 
tion of this pedantic oracle. 

THE PASTOR HAS HIS IDEAS 

Freedom of speech is not re- 
strained as pastors treat us to their 
ideas of what a mission should be, 
how conducted, and what they ex- 
pect. We might classify their vari- 
ous orientations somewhat after 
this fashion. There is the "Litur- 
gical minded" who is to be served 
with ceremonial embellishments 
and ritualistic discussions ; we meet 
the "clean-up zealot" whose only 
plea is : "Ready my people for Eas- 
ter"; the "financial comptometer" 
with slogan: "Mission or Bazaar"; 
then, the "revenue expect" who in- 
sists that we "be sure and cut 
short the services tonight for Bin- 
go is coming up." And who has 
not encountered that "efficiency 
slave" who would "keep the record 
straight"? To him the mission is 
but a mechanical soul-saving ma- 
chine. The occasional vacuum 
cleaner. How refreshing to come 
upon that normally good pastor 
zealous for the welfare of souls. 
To him our work means an all-out 
effort to bring back the strayed, to 
strengthen the faithful ones. He 



encourages every effort to enliven 
parish societies, to increase devo- 
tion, and to stress the responsibili- 
ties of young and old. Moreover, 
he prepares the ground that the 
best results be obtained. Probably 
all are mindful of Canon 1349. 

THE MISSIONER 
FACES THE MUSIC 

Whilst it is painfully true that 
indifference to and criticism of 
missions are to be expected, proba- 
bly anticipated, a truth no less 
freighted with sorrow, is the ad- 
mission that all too often the com- 
plaints about missioners are well 
founded. We do have men on the 
platform preaching the cause of 
Christ in an uninteresting and 
worn out style. With sleepy ap- 
proach, old platitudes or spiritual 
bromides, torturing scriptual pas- 
sages beyond contextual meaning. 
As outlet for a bit of indignation, 
the unfortunate Judas is brought 
forth to become the whipping boy. 
Or, good old St. Peter must suffer 
castigation at the hands of the 
preacher for his cowardice. A much 
better job could be done on the 
modern version of either Judas or 
Peter. 

Then, there is he who, forgetting 
that the Crucified is the subject 
and object of admiration, turns 
the spotlight upon himself. The 
overtones of insincerity soon de- 
stroy the harmony. When seeking 



263 



FORUM 



the popular style of easy explana- 
tion in conventional phrasing, how 
often the descent to smart talk, 
wise cracks, the laugh creating 
story, whose point is lost in the at- 
tempt at humor or wit. Readily do 
such lose dignity and seriousness 
both on the platform and in the 
confessional. Even pastors have 
been scandalized! 

As the missioner is "actively on 
the mission" during his entire time 
with pastor and people, naturally 
his conduct is building up or tear- 
ing down his ministry within the 
church. God knows, we are not 
angels in the flesh. It is not ex- 
pected that we should be. Neither 
are we expected to portray in 
thought or language or intemper- 
ance, attitudes of the irresponsible 
worldling. 

Delinquencies such as these are 
decried in our Rule. They were 
reviewed in the Missionary Con- 
ference, and condemned. But who 
is there to check and chide? No 
one, until a noticeable faux pas bor- 
dering on scandal arouses the ire 
of fellow missioners. Then possi- 
bly an official monitum. The horse 
has already been stolen! 

THE MISSION IS HERE TO STAY 
AND SO ARE WE 

In very spite of carping criti- 
cism the mission carries its own 
virtue and is here to stay. It holds 
a dignified place in the spiritual 



program of Mother Church. Its 
important function is admitted by 
the prescription of Canon Law, 
calling upon Bishops to see to it 
that the people are thus refreshed 
at least once in every ten years. 
I know of no other undertaking in 
behalf of the people singled out 
by canonical mandate. 

Modern and most worthy striv- 
ings through Catholic Action can- 
not and do not pretend to preclude 
the parochial mission. Fluttering 
hearts and weakened wills in the 
milieu of temptations we have al- 
ways with us. Leakage in varying 
degree is normal. The best ap- 
proach would seem to be the parish 
mission. Should the zeal and ener- 
gies of professed missioners be 
channelled elsewhere, who become 
the rescuers of the marginal Cath- 
olics? Changes in social and po- 
litical outlook indicate too fre- 
quently ebb tides in moral life, 
and the ever present need of the 
spiritual uplift known as the mis- 
sion. And I mean, not liturgical, 
Eucharistic or ecclesiastical season- 
tide courses of dated sermons. Bet- 
ter leave to free lance specialists 
to discourse on such matters, whilst 
we cling to the eternal truths in 
the light of Christ's Passion. 

Again, to quote the Rev. Rein- 
hold : "Of course, if you assume 
that you are preaching to people 
who don't know the eternal truths, 
or have forgotten them, or who 



264 



FORUM 



need cuffing about by the strongest 
emotional upheaval possible, then 
the gentle modes of the liturgy will 
not furnish you with the sledge- 
hammer imagery you need." (Lit- 
urgical Parish Missions — H. A. 
Reinhold) That is precisely what 
we do assume, eliminating the un- 
warranted invective about cuffing 
our audience. "The question re- 
mains however"; he continues, "do 
parishes which have missions in in- 
tervals of 12, 24, or 36 months, 
need such shock treatment? Or, 
don't they rather need help to find 
their way into a lasting self-ac- 
tivating life within their parish, 
their family, their community"? 
My answer to the first question is 
yes. They do need a bit of shock 
treatment. All of us do periodical- 
ly. Many somnolent pastors have 
registered surprise as the results 
following the missioner's "straight 
talk." Old time delinquents return- 
ing to their God ; new faces at the 
communion rail ; sheep he did not 
even suspect as belonging to his 
fold. Submerged souls are brought 
to the surface by the man of God 
who dared to challenge their 
lethargy. 

To his alternate question I would 
qualify my reply. Some could well 
use the needed help to self-activat- 
ing life within the parish, the 
family, and the home, beyond the 
scope of the usual subjects treated 
during the mission. For their fur- 



ther advancement, I would suggest 
the closed retreat, or a series of 
particularized lectures. The as- 
sumption being that thy are nor- 
mally at peace with God and desire 
to come closer to Him. But by 
what calculations are we justified 
in exchanging the divine pro- 
nouncements about man's purpose 
in life, his pitfalls, the eternal 
sanctions, for the "gentle mode of 
the liturgy"? Generally, those with 
whom we have to deal need strong- 
er meat. 

It could be possible that the good 
Father writes from an ivory tower 
of idealistic Utopia. Could be that 
the small country parish over 
which he presides, even without 
benefit of parochial school has thor- 
oughly absorbed his dream and im- 
plemented his every wish. I would 
not know. 

WE GUARD POSSESSION 

To our missioners, old and youth- 
ful, and to our future Passionist 
apostles presently in process of in- 
cubation, my caution is this: do 
not be deflected from your course 
by the red herring of academic 
pragmatists, who glibly speak and 
write in disparagement of so pow- 
erful an instrument placed within 
our competence by Mother Church, 
to do battle for Christ and souls. 

Abbe Godin had fashioned a 
litany to Our Lady, to which he 



265 



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would add new invocations as time 
went on. With profit we could 
make our own his plea to Mother 
Mary to be delivered "From get- 
ting stale in my ideals as priest." 
And another: "Deliver me from 
my laziness, my incapacity, (any- 
how, a little)." With the Apostle 



Paul we are committed to serve in 
the grand scheme of advancing 
others "to the mature measure of 
the fullness of Christ" within a 
given assignment. Paul the Mis- 
sioner, becomes our teacher, guide, 
and inspiration. He did not fail 
us, nor shall we betray him. 



S?t. £<L,in. C.<P 



"MATER SANCTAE SPEI." (Eccles. 24,24) 

"Thy very face and form, sweet Mother, speak to us of the Eternal; 
not like earthly beauty, dangerous to look upon, but like the morning 
star, which is thy emblem, bright and musical, breathing purity, telling 
of heaven, and infusing peace. O harbinger of day! O hope of the 
pilgrim! lead us as thou hast led; in the dark night, across the bleak 
wilderness, guide us on to Jesus, guide us home. 

Maria, mater gratiae, 
Dulcis parens clementiae, 
Tu nos ab hoste protege, 
Et mortis hora suscipe." 

Cardinal Newman. 



266 



uMedltatlons on the <SoWows ofcJucrty 



THE SECOND SORROW 
THE FLIGHT INTO EGYPT 



THE second major sorrow which 
■ transpierced the Holy Heart of 
Mary was occasioned by the flight 
with her Divine Child into that 
strange and distant Egypt. 

Let us consider the circumstanc- 
es of that event as they affected 
her and draw from them a better 
understanding of her woe, while 
at the same time we learn from 
them lessons that are helpful to 
our spiritual life. 

Picture, then, the holy house of 
Mary and Joseph, shortly after the 
birth of the Divine Child. Evening 
has fallen. The simple meal has 
ended. Mary busies herself with 
the domestic tasks of the hour, 
tranquil in the protective company 
of St. Joseph. Presently, there are 
evening devotions and the house- 
hold sinks into peaceful rest. 

A few hours of refreshing sleep 
are suddenly ended by the low, ur- 
gent tones of Joseph's voice : "Ma- 
ry! Arise! We must go! This 
night an angel of God stood near 
and said to me, 'Take the Child 
and His Mother and flee into Egypt 
and remain there till I tell thee. 
For it shall come to pass that 
Herod will seek the Child to de- 
stroy Him.' " Promptly, but calm- 
ly, their few preparations are 



made; then, mounted on their bur- 
ro, and clasping the Divine Child 
to her heart, she leaves on a long 
and lonely flight. 

Oh! what a sorrow that was to 
her devoted heart! She left her 
home in the Holy City, where she 
had been reared by her blessed par- 
ents, Joachim and Ann ; the scene 
of her childhood's holiness, instilled 
by their loving teaching and fos- 
tered by their loving care. She 
left her home in Nazareth, where 
the Angel Gabriel had come to hail 
her as the most blessed among 
women, to seek and receive her 
consent to the Incarnation of the 
Word, and wherein that sublime 
mystery had been accomplished. 
She left her home in Bethlehem 
where she had seen the wise kings 
adore her Child as the Son of the 
Most High God ; where very soon 
her friends and neighbors would 
be mourning over their murdered 
babes. 

Oh, Yes! Leaving her home was 
a bitter sorrow to the Holy Mother 
of God. 

Leaving her home, however, was 
not her only grief. She was also 
leaving her country, the land of 
God's special choosing for her peo- 
ple; the land into which Abraham 



267 



had been led from the heathendom 
of the Chaldees ; the homeland of 
the patriarchs, Isaac, Jacob and 
Joseph. She was leaving its snowy 
mountains, its fruitful plains, its 
lakes and flowing rivers, to live as 
a stranger near the monotonous, 
sandy wastes of the far off Egyp- 
tian desert. 

She was leaving her people whom 
she knew to be God's people by 
special election. She was leaving 
her people, God's people, whom she 
knew to be dear to Him as "the 
apple of His eye"; God's people to 
whom He had revealed Himself; 
whom He had cherished, nourished 
and protected; whom He had guid- 
ed through the centuries; God's 
people, to whom He had sent a 
long line of prophets and holy ones. 
She was leaving her people, God's 
people; to dwell, she knew not how 
long, with a people that knew not 
God. She would no longer be near 
the Temple where, alone on all the 
earth, was offered the acceptable, 
sacrificial worship of the One True 
God ; no longer near the Temple in 
which she had been consecrated to 
the service of God; the Temple 
where in she had been united by 
holy marriage to the blessed Jo- 
seph, her holy spouse and protec- 
tor; where holy Simeon had sung 
his "Nunc dimittis" with her new- 
born Child in his arms and Anna, 
the prophetess, had acknowledged 
and proclaimed Him as the Ex- 
pected One of Israel. She was 



leaving the Temple, her very life, 
with its Holy of Holies, for the 
surroundings of pagan worship, 
where temples were raised to birds, 
beasts and reptiles; altars were 
dedicated to deified human beings 
and worship was paid to human 
vice. She was leaving the Temple, 
with its holy service, to live in a 
land where man and beast were 
given the divine honor, preference 
and worship which belongs to God 
alone. 

Who then can measure the grief 
of the Virgin Daughter of Sion as 
she left her home, her country, her 
people and the sanctuary of her 
God and fled into the habitation of 
iniquity that was Egypt? The 
prophet of her sorrows could find 
nothing to which he could compare 
them save the measureless expanse 
of the sea. 

She, who had never offended God 
or her neighbor, was fleeing 
stealthily by night; fleeing from 
danger to her Child, danger to her 
spouse, danger to herself. Fleeing 
suddenly, in the dark, with little 
or no preparation, from all that 
this world holds dear. Now she 
knew for the second time the cruel 
stab of sorrow's sword. Now a- 
gain, she "felt the iron in her soul" 
and her pure heart was rent in 
twain by grief's destroying blade. 
Again her soul was pierced ; and 
silently she prayed, in and through 
her grief, that men might yet be 
brought to know and love her Di- 



268 



vine Son, for Whose sake and 
safety she was now in sorrowful 
flight. 

But what is the reason that this 
mournful sorrow has come to the 
Holy Mother of God? Is it not to 
convince us of the necessity of 
fleeing from sin and its many oc- 
casions? Is it not to teach us the 
necessity of preserving and in- 
creasing the life of grace in our 
souls at any cost? I shall ask my- 



self, "Do I resolutely turn aside 
from all that would separate me 
from grace; from all that would 
cause it to diminish in my soul? 
Do I try to build into my life a 
preference for the Will of God a- 
bove all things? Do I so earnestly 
desire to live in the state of grace 
that I willingly leave all things, 
and myself as well, to make sure 
of doing so?" 

Fr. Agatho, C. P. 






i 



§ 



"Friday is the day of the Passion of my most holy and Sorrowful 
Mother; recommend me often to her, that her dolors and the Passion 
of my Jesus may be impressed on my heart." 

St. Paul of the Cross, Letters, Vol. I, p. 134. 



269 



Indumentum Passionis 



0m Scapular 




HEMEMBER two dates: Novem- 
■^ ber 15, 1769, and September 
15, 1775. They are two outstanding 
moments of triumph in the life of 
St. Paul of the Cross, historic dates 
in the founding of his Congrega- 
tion. They are found on two Pon- 
tifical Bulls: Supremi Apostolatus, 
of Clement XIV, Nov. 15, 1769, and 
Praeclara Virtutum Exempla of 
Pius VI, Sept. 15, 1775. The latter, 
which was considered by our Holy 
Founder as the definitive confirma- 
tion of the Passionist Rule and 
Institute, came a bare month be- 
fore he passed to his reward. He 
could do so with the supreme con- 
solation of a religious founder, in 
the knowledge that his work was 
completed, in the firm hope that it 
might now withstand the assaults 
of time and the world. The former, 
"the great constitutional charter 
of the Congregation of the Pas- 
sion," Supremi Apostolatus, was 
placed in the excited hands of our 
Holy Founder by Clement XIV 
himself. The old man's joy was 
indescribable. It appears in the 
jubilant tone of every letter he 
wrote at this time. 

There was another angle to his 



happiness. "It is rich in great 
privileges," he writes to one. To 
another, "I have the Bull and the 
Brief in my hands, and they are 
full of privileges and favors." 1 The 
accumulations of privileges and in- 
dulgences was always an upper- 
most in Paul's mind, and he made 
use of his exceptional intimacy 
with several Sovereign Pontiffs to 
augment them. When the barest 
nod would have brought unwonted 
material favors from such Popes 
as, e.g., the two Clements, XII and 
XIV, the Saint would instead ask 
for some spiritual favor. In this 
regard, there are on record several 
amusing incidents of a quietly ex- 
asperated Rector of St. John and 
Paul's, who was having some little 
difficulty meeting expenses! 

This accumulation of privileges 
and favors still characterizes the 
Congregation. A summary glance 
over the intervening years reveals 
any number of instances. Especial- 
ly is it true of two eminently Pas- 
sionist institutions : the Archcon- 
fraternity of the Passion, and its 
distinctive badge, the Black Scapu- 
lar of the Passion. Both mark their 
inception during the reign of Pius 



270 



IX. That great Pontiff, whom sick- 
ness barred from entering the Con- 
gregation of the Passion, has more 
than one title to our enduring 
gratitude. Not the least of these 
is the Black Scapular of the Pas- 
sion, which we have chosen as the 
subject of this article. 

The Black Scapular of the Pas- 
sion is of particular interest to us, 
as Passionists. It is an adjunct of 
every Passionist Mission, and, as 
we learn from an article published 
in the Ecclesiastical Review over a 
quarter-century ago, the Black 
Scapular of the Passion is well 
known among the faithful, "owing 
to the missionary labours of the 
Passionist Fathers, . . and particu- 
larly in English-speaking countries 
where their work has been crowned 
with more than ordinary success." 
(Vol. 67, 1922, p. 53) 

For a more precise 

of"capula« understandin £ of the 
history of the Black 

Scapular of the Passion, it will be 
of help to recall that, as found in 
the Church today, scapulars are 
divided into three classes: 1) those 
which are the distinctive badge of 
a given Confraternity, whose valid 
reception likewise requires inscrip- 
tion into that Confraternity. The 
most notable example of this type 
of scapular today is the famous 
scapular of the Blessed Virgin 
Mary of Mount Carmel. 2) those 
which, like the former, are the dis- 
tinctive badge of some Confrater- 



nity, but which may be received 
validly by the faithful at large, 
even though they have little or 
nothing to do with the Confrater- 
nity. An instance of this type is 
the Black Scapular of the Passion. 
3) finally, those who do not form 
the badge of any Confraternity, 
but are worn by the faithful merely 
as a sign of devotion. The Scapu- 
lar of St. Joseph, promoted .by the 
Capuchins, is representative of 
this type. 3 

Originally, the Black 

the g Black Sca P ular of the Passion 
Scapular, belonged to the first cate- 
gory. As first approved, 
it was the distinctive sign of the 
Confraternity of the Passion, and 
enrollment into the Confraternity 
was necessary for its valid recep- 
tion. The Confraternity of the 
Passion was only two years old 
when Most Rev. Fr. General, Fr. 
Peter Paul of the Sorrowful Vir- 
gin, petitioned the Holy See for the 
approval of this "small habit or 
sacred scapular of black, bearing 
the signs of our Lord's Passion," 
by which henceforth the members 
of the Confraternity might be dis- 
tinguished. The rescript of approv- 
al was granted, making the Black 
Scapular the distinctive mark of 
the Confraternity of the Passion.' 
There were no indulgences attached 
to the wearing of the Scapular at 
this time, for its wearers, by virtue 
of their inscription into the Con- 
fraternity, enjoyed participation in 



271 



Form 



all the indulgences and spiritual 
blessings of the Congregation 
itself. 

The form of the Black 
Scapular, as mentioned in 
the Rescript, called for "a black 
scapular, bearing the signs of the 
Lord's Passion." Inevitably, these 
"signs of the Lord's Passion" be- 
came by custom the Passionist 
"Sign," surrounded by the words: 
SIT SEMPER IN CORDIBUS 
NOSTRIS, to complete the beauti- 
ful prayer, which for most of us, 
is the one thing we remember most 
vividly from our first contact with 
the Passionists. It was unthinka- 
ble, of course, that any scapular 
which was to represent the Pas- 
sionist habit should fail to repre- 
sent its most striking feature, the 
"sign of salvation," which Paul of 
the Cross had first seen over the 
heart of the Mother of God her- 
self, clothed in the tunic of the 
Passion, and heard those words 
which identify forever all "who 
wear the same habit of sorrow, 
continually in mourning over the 
death of Christ our Lord." 5 

From another angle, too, it was 
most natural that the "Sign" be 
chosen to identify the Passion of 
our Lord. The faithful themselves 
are greatly attracted to the Sign. 
It has always been so. In his Life 
of St. Paul of the Cross, Father 
Cajetan, the Belgian Passionist, 
relates the amusing incident of our 
Holy Founder himself in startled 
amazement as an emboldened ad- 

272 



Extension 



mirer whipped out a penknife and 
made off in triumph with the Sign 
which had been sewn to his habit! 
The Black Scapular did 
not long retain its orig- 
inal character. When the first dec- 
ade of its existence proved it to 
be an excellent means of promoting 
devotion to the Passion, the Gener- 
al besought the Sovereign Pontiff 
to extend it to all the faithful, 
irrespective of their connection 
with the Confraternity of the Pas- 
sion. Again it was the ever-gra- 
cious Pius IX who granted the re- 
quest with a Brief, on June 23, 
1876. The Black Scapular thus as- 
sumed its present day status, an 
example of the second type of scap- 
ulars. Since the scapular was no 
longer restricted to the members of 
the Confraternity of the Passion, 
a summary if indulgences was si- 
multaneously granted to those who 
wore it. Though identical with the 
summary of indulgences granted to 
the members of the Confraternity, 
these latter might gain them solely 
by virtue of their enrollment in 
the registers of the Confraternity, 
being under no obligation to wear 
the Black Scapular constantly. 
Finally, the same Rescript gave the 
General power to delegate, to oth- 
ers than priests of the Congrega- 
tion, the faculty of blessing and im- 
posing the Black Scapular of the 
Passion." 

The indulgences at- 
tached to the wearing 
of the Black Scapular, and those 



Indulgences 



granted to the members of the 
Confraternity of the Passion, re- 
mained identical until as recently 
as 1935. In that year, a special 
scapular summary was granted. 7 
For the Confraternity, on the other 
hand, the magnificent summary 
given by Pope Benedict XV, May 
25, 1918, on the occasion of the 
Fiftieth Anniversary of the Can- 
onization of our Holy Founder, 
continued in force. This new scap- 
ular summary has appeared on two 
different occasions in the Acta Con- 
gregationis, (Vol. XIII, p. 61 ; Vol. 
XIV, p. 116) but, because it is not 
so readily available, we have 
thought best to reproduce it once 
again here. 

Those who wear the 
Summary of Black Scapular of the 
Indulgences. _ 

Passion may gain, un- 
der the usual conditions, the fol- 
lowing indulgences: 

I. A Plenary Indulgence: 

a) On the day of the Reception 
of the Scapular; 

b) On the following feasts: Sol- 
emn Commemoration of the Pas- 
sion (Tuesday after Sexagesima 
Sunday); Most Holy Redeemer; 
Most Precious Blood ; Corpus 
Christi ; Finding and Exaltation of 
the Most Holy Cross; Sorrowful 
Mother (Friday after Passion Sun- 
day) ; Seven Dolors of the Blessed 
Virgin; St. John the Evangelist. 

c) Every Friday, on which they 
give at least a quarter-hour to 
meditation on the Passion, even if 
they do so with the aid of a book. 



II. A Plenary Indulgence in ar- 
ticulo mortis: on the reception of 
Confession and Communion (Viati- 
cum), or, if they are unable to do 
that, being at least contrite, they 
devoutly invoke the Most Holy 
Name of Jesus with their lips, or 
at least in their heart, and pa- 
tiently accept death from the hands 
of God, as the wages of sin. 

III. A Plenary Indulgence Toties 
Quoties, on the Feast of St. Paul 
of the Cross, i.e., as often as, hav- 
ing received the sacraments of 
Confession and Holy Communion, 
they visit some Church or public 
oratory of the Congregation, or of 
the Confraternity of the Passion, 
and there recite six times the Our 
Father, Haily Mary, and Glory be 
to the Father, .for the intentions of 
the Supreme Pontiff. 

Indult: In those places where 
there is no Church or Public Ora- 
tory of the Congregation or of the 
Confraternity of the Passion, or if 
such a Church cannot be easily 
visited, then the above Toties Quo- 
ties indulgences can be gained, pro- 
vided the other conditions are ful- 
filled, by visiting one's own parish 
church. 

IV. The Stational Indulgences, as 
given in the Roman Missal. The 
Stational days are the following: 
the Sundays and Ember Days of 
Advent; the feasts of Christmas, 
St. Stephen, St. John the Apostle 
and Evangelist, Holy Innocents, 
Circumcision, Epiphany; the Sun- 
days of Septuagesima, Sexagesima. 

L , 7: > . 



and Quinquagesima; all the days 
from Ash Wednesday to Low Sun- 
day (Sunday after Easter) inclus- 
ively; Ascension Thursday; the 
Vigil of Pentecost, and the six days 
following; the Ember Days of 
September. 

A decree of the Sacred Peniten- 
tiary, dated April 12, 1932, and a 
declarative interpretation of the 
same, dated Feb. 25, 1933, have de- 
termined the following conditions 
for gaining the Stational Indul- 
gences in those places (such as the 
United States) where there are no 
Stational Churches : 

1. That on these days, one who, 
truly sorry for his sins, has been 
to Confession and Communion, de- 
voutly visits a church and there 
recites before the Blessed Sacra- 
ment eight times the Our Father, 
Hail Mary, and Glory be to the 
Father, and at least one more Our 
Father, Haily Mary and Glory be 
to the Father for the intention of 
the Holy Father, gains a Plenary 
Indulgence. 

2. One who merely visits the 
Church, (i.e., without having gone 
to Confession and Communion), 
and with a contrite heart recites 
the above prayers, gains a partial 
indulgence of ten years. 

V. Partial Indulgences: on the 
condition of at least having sorrow 
for one's sins, one who wears the 
Black Scapular may gain a partial 
indulgence of: 

1. Seven years, as often as they 
recite the Grades of the Passion ; 

274 



2. Five years, every time they 
devote some space of time to medi- 
tation on the Passion of our Lord 
Jesus Christ, as mentioned above; 

3. Fifty days, every time they 
perform an act of Divine worship 
or piety, or any prescribed act of 
mortification, or any work of mercy 
towards one's neighbour, or are 
present at any conferences held for 
the purpose of recalling the Pas- 
sion of Christ or procuring the 
betterment of souls. 

While appreciably smaller than 
the Confraternity Summary, this 
new scapular summary, as we can 
see, lists an imposing array of in- 
dulgences. When coupled with the 
former, it attests in an outstand- 
ing manner the importance of de- 
votion to the Passion in the Chris- 
tian life, and will long remain a 
monument to the liberality of the 
Pontiffs. For instance, those capa- 
ble of gaining the indulgences at- 
tached to both the one and the 
other, may, by fulfilling the con- 
ditions, gain over 550 plenary in- 
dulgences during the year. This is 
exclusive of the Toties Quoties In- 
dulgence on the Feast of St. Paul 
of the Cross. The list of partial 
indulgences is scarcely less ap- 
pealing. 

Numerous decrees 
Scapular h been promul . 

Requirements . f 

gated, defining the 

essential conditions required on the 
part of the many scapulars in use 
in the Church. When we link those 
which are pertinent to others de- 



termining the form of the Black 
Scapular, we fix upon the follow- 
ing: 

1. The Scapular must be made 
of wool, 8 black in color, bearing 
signs of the Lord's Passion, 9 as we 
have described above, and of a 
rectangular or square shape. It 
may not be round or oval. 10 

2. It must be worn in the pre- 
scribed manner, namely, so that it 
hangs both in front and in back, 
over the shoulders. 11 It may be 
worn either above or beneath the 
clothing. 12 

3. It must be worn always, day 
and night, otherwise, the acquisi- 
tion of the indulgnces is suspend- 
ed. 13 It may be removed for a 
short while, for a reasonable cause, 
but even should one neglect to wear 
it for a considerable time, he need 
not be re-enrolled, but must merely 
resume the wearing of it. 14 

4. Finally, the scapular medal 
may afterwards be substituted for 
the Black Scapular. The scapular 
medal need not be worn around 
the neck, but may be worn or car- 
ried anywhere on one's person, pro- 
viding the reverence befitting a 
blessed object is preserved. 15 

The present rite of bless- 

Blerafng ing and im P osin ^ the 
Black Scapular is the orig- 
inal formula first approved by Pius 
IX, on July 30, 1863. It may be 
found in our Ceremonial, Part IV, 
no. IX. It is also to be found a- 
mong the B enedictiones Propriae, 
the fifth in number, in the Appen- 



dix to the Roman Ritual, p. 515. 
For the priest who officiates, the 
rubrics prescribe a surplice and a 
red stole. The rite consists of two 
preliminary versicles with an ora- 
tion commemorating the various 
grades of the Passion, followed by 
four versicles and the oration con- 
taining the blessing of the scapu- 
lar. The scapular is then sprinkled 
with holy water and imposed on the 
recipient with the words : "May the 
Lord clothe thee with the new man, 
that, being strengthened by this 
mournful badge of penance, you 
may ever look upon Jesus, Whom 
the hands of the wicked have trans- 
fixed, and grieve over Him as one 
grieves over the death of a first- 
born." Next follows the short 
formula of participation in all the 
spiritual blessings of the Congre- 
gation, and the ejaculatory prayer, 
"May the Passion of our Lord Je- 
sus Christ be ever in our hearts," 
which completes the rite. 

This is the rite prescribed, and 
must be used for validity. The 
Sacred Congregation has expressly 
declared that a simple sign of the 
cross over the scapular does not 
suffice. 10 In the case of urgent 
necessity, however, only the essen- 
tials need be pronounced, i.e., those 
words which express the blessing 
and imposition. 17 It is further re- 
quired that the same priest who 
blesses the scapular also place it 
over the recipient's shoulders. 18 
One shoulder suffices, if it cannot 
easily be put over the head. 19 If it 

275 



facilitates matters, the enrolling 
priest may use the same scapular 
successively, if there are several to 
receive it, as long as the persons 
thus enrolled make sure that the 
first scapular they put on subse- 
quently be a blessed scapular. 20 
Further scapulars used as replace- 
ments need not be blessed. Finally, 
if many are to be enrolled at the 
same time, the priest may say the 
formula of imposition in the plural, 
and then successively and without 
interruption impose the scapular 
on all present. 21 

Though not of great length 



Ritus 
Brevior 



in itself, it is easily under- 
stood how this original 
formula might prove too long and 
onerous in the case of a busy Mis- 
sionary or Retreat Master. So in 
fact it happened. As a result, lest 
such an excellent means of promot- 
ing devotion to the Passion should 
defeat its end, the vigilant eyes 
of our Superiors have several times 
obtained privileges shortening the 
original form. The first of these, 
in logical if not chronological or- 
der, is the so-called Ritus Brevior, 
which consists in the omission of 
the first two versicles and their 
accompanying oration. Since this 
oration is the longest contained in 
the rite, this omission, in total 
wordage, reduces the form by prac- 
tically a half. This short formula, 
as is evident from the petition 
submitted to the Holy See by the 
Procurator of the Congregation, on 
Jan. 9, 1924, and from the corres- 

276 



ponding note in our Collectio Facul- 
tatum, need not be restricted to the 
time of Missions and Retreats, and 
therefore may be used whenever 
there are many to be enrolled in 
the Scapular, or "whenever the 
priest is very busy, as oftentimes 
happens during the sacred minis- 
try." 22 

A further concession, in 
Special ^ e f orm f a special rite 

and formula, restricted to 
the time of Missions and Retreats, 
was granted by His Holiness Pope 
Leo XIII, at the request of Most 
Rev. Fr. General, the Venerable 
Bernard Mary of Jesus. According 
to the Rescript, this special formu- 
la may be used for the Black Scap- 
ular of the Passion only, and con- 
sists in the following shortening 
of the two previous forms: "Each 
of the faithful shall hold in hand 
his own scapular, while the priest 
blesses all the scapulars at once, 
saying but once the customary 
formula of blessing. When the rite 
of blessing is completed, each shall 
put on his own scapular, while the 
priest says the formula of imposi- 
tion over all at once: Induat vos 
Dominus novum hominem, etc., 
with the rest that follows." 23 

Finally, of greatest im- 

£? pa l port to the Missionaries 
Blessing * 

and Retreat Masters, is 

the peculiar concession which, al- 
though it does not pertain exclu- 
sively to the Black Scapular, nev- 
ertheless includes it. This is the 
Rescript of the Sacred Congrega- 



tion, dated January 10, 1906, which 
states that our "missionaries, may, 
at the last sermon whether of Mis- 
sions or Spiritual Exercises, even 
though these be held privately, 
bless and impose all scapulars, 
without using any formula, solely 
by the so-called Papal Bless- 
ing. . . ." 24 Later, after Pius X had 
extended the use of the Scapular 
Medal to all the faithful, this con- 
cession was extended to it also. 25 
This faculty needs no commentary. 
It has been a great factor aiding 
in the widespread acceptance of the 
Black Scapular of the Passion. 

If this brief resume 
does not more than in- 
dicate the great possibilities of the 
Black Scapular for the spread and 
promotion of devotion to the Sa- 
cred Passion, it has done much. 
The Sacred Passion has a mag- 
netism all its own. "And I, if I 
be lifted up from the earth, will 
draw all things to myself." If we 
but effectively place our Christian 
people within the range of its draw- 
ing power, the Passion will hold 
them and draw them closer and 
closer. Since the Passion has a 
magnetic attraction reaching to the 
most intimate and trivial details 



Conclusion 



of daily life, the constant wearing 
of the Black Scapular, together 
with a pointed realization of its 
spirit, becomes a force which can 
orientate each detail in turn 
towards its inevitable and irresisti- 
ble pole of attraction, the love of 
the Crucified. 

Indirectly, this short summary 
has also a very enlightening 
thought for us. It lies in this: 
what blessings must the religious 
habit itself confer on its wearers! 
Add to this the innumerable in- 
dulgences, practically beyond com- 
putation, an outstanding example 
of which is Privilege No. 155 of 
the Collectio. "By wearing the re- 
ligious habit, we gain the same in- 
dulgences and spiritual blessings 
which those enjoy who are enrolled 
in the Confraternities of the Most 
Holy Rosary, of the Blessed Virgin 
of Mt. Carmel, of the Sorrowful 
Virgin, and other like Confrater- 
nities." Additional motives for 
loving our habit more, and striving 
to be more worthy to wear it! 

Finally, the greater our appre- 
ciation and esteem for our holy 
habit, the more will we seek to 
communicate its benefits to others. 



l Lettere, Vol. Ill, p. 710 ; ibid., p. 295 ; 2 All the Pontifical Documents connected with t.ho 
Black Scapular of the Passion may be found in the Acta Congregationia, Vol. XIV, p. lOSff. 
(lit:!!)). The burden of the present article has been drawn from that excellent line-up. to 
which the reader is referrd for further details. a Acta Conj?r.. Vol. XIV. (lit:;;)), p. lit:.. 
4S R C Rescript. July :50, 1863. r. Life of St. Paul of the Cross. Sarins, edit. Turin. lSTt!; cf. 
also. Acta. Vol. XIV, p. 114. 6 Cf . Bouscaren, Canon Law Dig—t, Vol. I. p. ill. Can. 912, 
revoking this latter faculty. However, all our priests are delegated by l'Y. General to bless 
and impose the Black Scapular cf. Colhctio. n. 81. ~ Hence, the summary given in the Colhrtio 
Facultatum et Indulgentiarum no longer belongs to the Scapular. B S.C.Ind. Aug. is. L868, 
9 Rescript S. R. C, July :50, 186U; to D. 428, S.C. Ind., Auk. 18. 1868. 11 S.C. Ind.. Feb. 
12. 1840, D. 277. 12 S. C. Ind.. March 12, L866, D. 887. 18 D. 278 S.C. Ind.. Feb. 12, 1840. 
14 S.C. Ind., May 27, 18f»7, D. 879. LB S.C.S.O.. Dec. 16, 1910. i« S.C. Ind.. Au«. 27. 1887. 



277 



Regarding our Regulations 



lus Particulate C.P. 




THE REGULATIONS OF THE CONGREGATION 

(Pt. I, T. V., Ch. II) 



NOTION 



113. By the name Regu- 
lations, in our Congrega- 
tion, we understand those laws 
superadded to the Rules, proposed 
and enacted by the Superiors and 
the General Chapters for the better 
government of the Congregation. 
The Regulations, therefore, to use 
the words of our Holy Founder, 
"are not Rules, but a preservative 
to ensure the observance and pre- 
vent the transgression of the 
Rules; nay, they are the perfection 
of the Rules, for by their means 
our works are made full and will 
be acceptable in the eyes of the 
Divine Majesty." 1 

114. The first mention of 
the Regulations occurs in 
a letter of our Holy Founder, dated 
October 14, 1755, written after the 
second General Chapter, wherein 
he exhorts the religious that "they 
should observe the Regulamentum 



ORIGIN 



which he had drawn up, and had 
ordered to be read in all the re- 
treats, by his authority." 2 

Later, in a letter of August 16, 
1757, he commands that all the 
priests destined for hearing con- 
fessions should follow the fifth reg- 
ulation of the second part, and 
should read it frequently and keep 
it impressed upon their minds, in 
as much as it contains the manner 
of dealing prudently with penitents, 
for the greater glory of God and 
the salvation of souls. 3 

After our Holy Founder's death, 
the Regulations were more than 
once revised, augmented and 
emended. In the first place, the 7th 
General Chapter (1778), true to 
the desire of our Holy Founder, 
drew up the Regulations in a bet- 
ter, more practical form, and in its 
second session promulgated the 
new Regulations, decreed their ob- 



Which then will be the prayer: Domine Jesu Christc, qui tegumen ... which contains the 
blessing, and the formula of imposition which immeidately follows it in the rite: Induat te 
Doviinua novum hominem. . . cf. S.C. Ind.. Aug. 18, 1868. D. 421; Aug. 24, 1844, D. 329. 18 
S.C. Ind.. June 16. 1872. D. 430. 19 S.C. Ind.. Sept. 26. 1892. 20 S.C. Ind., Aug. 18, 1868, 
D. 421. 21 S.C. Ind., Apr. 18. 1891. 22 S.R.C Rescript Jan. 9, 1924; cf. Collectio Facultatum, 
n. 31. 2:1 S.R.C. Rescript Dec. 12, 1898; cf. Collectio, n. 82 and note. 24 S.R.C Rescript Jan. 
10, 1906; cf. Collectio, n. 83. 25 S. Peniten., Rescript April 16, 1920; cf. Collectio, n. 84. 

278 



servance, and the public reading 
of them on stated days. 4 

A new revision and emendation 
was made by the 15th General 
Chapter (1827). In ten sessions, 
from the 5th to the 15th, the Capit- 
ular Fathers went over the decrees 
of preceding chapters, approving 
whatever they deemed to be of 
greater moment and more suitable 
to the times, and decreeing that 
the Secretary of the Chapter 
should take these decrees and com- 
pile a new collection before the 
month of November. Hence it was 
that in October of the same year, 
a special meeting of all the Capitu- 
lar Fathers was held in Rome, 
where it approved and promulgated 
the collection compiled by the Sec- 
retary. 5 

The 18th General Chapter, after 
another revision had been made, 
decreed that the Regulations should 
be printed, and this decree was re- 
newed by the 19th General Chap- 
ter, and entrusted to the General 
Curia. The 20th Chapter approved 
these printed Regulations, and 
made decrees with regard to the 
public reading and observance of 
the same." 

This collections remained un- 
touched until the 23rd General 
Chapter, in which the duty of pre- 
paring a new edition, to which 
several later decrees had been add- 
ed, 7 was committed to the Superior 
General. This edition the 24th 
Chapter (1884) recognized as au- 



thentic and promulgated. K In the 
following Chapters, the Fathers a- 
gain put their hand to emending, 
augmenting and polishing up the 
Regulations. In the 13th session 
of the 25th Chapter (1890), a 
special commission expressed its 
desire for a new edition, with this 
injunction, that in the beginning 
the entire letter of our Holy Found- 
er should be included ; and in the 
First Part, Chapter I, in regard to 
the ringing of the bells for Matins, 
there should be added these words : 
"unless the Superior shall decide 
otherwise" ; in the 4th Chapter, in 
regard to the Solemn Mass on 
feasts of the First Class, there 
should be added : "at which the 
whole Community should be pres- 
ent." The following Chapter (1893), 
in its 6th session, reiterated this 
decree. Later, the 30th General 
Chapter (1914), by its first de- 
cree, ordered inserted in the new 
collection a certain number of regu- 
lations recently imposed by the 
Holy See, mainly concerning the 
temporal administration. Finally, 
after the promulgation of the Code, 
upon the vote of the 31st General 
Chapter, the latest edition of the 
Regulations was published in Ital- 
ian, made more complete than any 
before it by the addition of many 
canons regarding religious. 

Two later Chapters also con- 
cerned themselves with the Regula- 
tions. The 32nd Chapter (1925) 
commanded that a summary of the 



279 



Customs be contained therein; 9 
and finally the 33rd Chapter, 
(1931) committed to the General 
Curia the obligation of publishing 
a new edition in Latin, in such 
manner, however, that a schema of 
the additions and emendations 
should first be submitted to each 
Provincial Curia for examination. 10 
The General Curia brought to a 
happy conclusion this duty en- 
trusted to it, and in 1935 the new 
Regulations were published. 



FIRST 
AUTHOR 



115. From what has been 
said, it is evident that 
our Father and Lawgiver 
was the first author of the Regu- 
lations, and this is confirmed by 
the previous annotation and the 
letter of our Holy Founder himself 
which is premised as a foreword 
to the Regulations. 11 It is very 
likely however, that St. Paul did 
not draw up the book of the Regu- 
lations all at once, but only as 
occasion offered, and as circum- 
stances indicated. Actually there is 
to be found in the General Archives 
a number of pages, containing reg- 
ulations for the lay brothers, es- 
pecially during the time of the 
quest; for the accepting of postu- 
lants, for Rectors, etc. . . . These, 
it is evident, must come from the 
pen of our Holy Founder. 

Therefore, it seems that from 
these particular regulations a col- 
lection was formed, for the per- 
fecting of which, if we may give 



credence to the writers of our early 
years, Paul made use of the works 
of Fr. Thomas of the Side of Jesus 
(Struzzieri), who it is narrated, 
drew up the book of the Regula- 
tions in the desert of Mt. Leucus, 
near Pontecorvo. This our Holy 
Founder afterwards approved, 
made his own and imposed upon 
the members of the Congregation. 12 



116. Our Holy 

OBLIGATION Founder ' as we have 
said, often inculcat- 
ed the observance of the Regula- 
tions. To this exhortation, the 7th 
General Chapter, second session, 
added a precept, commanding that 
the members of the Congregation 
observe the Regulations with all 
diligence, and imposing upon the 
Superiors the duty of seeing to 
their fulfillment. However, the 15th 
Chapter (1827), declaring this pre- 
cept more precisely, decreed that 
the Regulations should have all the 
force of law and that the religious 
are obliged to observe them. The 
18th General Chapter, 5th session, 
reiterated practically the same 
thing, as did the 30th General 
Chapter in its first decree, the 
words of which are referred to in 
the opening admonition of the reg- 
ulations, in which we read : "These 
Regulations are offered to all the 
religious of the Congregation and 
the observance of them is enjoined 
upon all, as having all the force 
of laws." 15 



280 



117. In former times 

RFADINC tne com P^ e ^ e wading of 
the Regulations had to 
be made in the Choir, in place of 
the Spiritual Reading, at least 
once a month ; 14 then only twice a 
year, during the time of Advent 
and Lent; 1 "' finally three times a 
year, after the 15th of December, 
April and August. 10 The 20th Gen- 
eral Chapter (1857) prescribed that 



the reading of the Regulations 
should no longer take place in 
Choir, but in the Refectory during 
the meals, in such manner that, 
like the Holy Rules, they should 
be completed twice in a year. 17 

Today, the Regulations must be 
read twice a week, during the pub- 
lic meals, as was mentioned above 
with regard to the Rules. 18 



l Statuta, Proemium, n. 2. 2 Lettere, IV, p. 253. 3 Letters, IV, p. 254. Ofr.Annali. Ill, p 
304. 4 Regolamonti del 1778, Preiazione. 5 Atti dclla Conor. Gen. tenuta nel Rit. dei SS. Giov. 
e Paolo li 22 e 2.i ottobrc 1827. 6 Cap. Gen. XVIII, sess. 5; Cap. Gen. XIX, sess. 8; Cap. Gen. 
XX, sess. 15. 7 Cap. Gen. XXIII, sess. 14, deer. 6. 8 Cap. Gen. XXIV, sess. 4. 9 Bolletino, VI, 
p. 171. io Acta Congr., XI, p. 213. ll Statuta, p. 3-7. 12 Storia deila Prov. dell' Addolorata, 
I, p. 138. 13 Statuta, p. 4. 14 Cap. Gen. VII, sess. 2. 15 Cap. Gen. VIII, deer. 5. 16 Cap. 
Gen. XV, sess. 14. n Cap. Gen. XX, sess. 15. 18 Statuta, n. 152, Cfr. n. 107. 



Within the past year the Holy See has approved another 
set of II Nocturn Lessons to be used by our Congregation on 
the Feast of St. Leonard of Port Maurice. If you need a copy 
we can supply you for the asking. "The Passionist." 






281 



Obituaries 1941 




Followers of the Crucified 

XII. 
Brother Martin of Jesus 

(John Joseph Cavallotto), of the Province of the Most Pure Heart of Mary, died on April 
25, 1941, in the 58th year of his age, and the 42nd year of his religious profession, in the 
House of Providence, Turin. 



f\ F capital importance is that 
^■^ exhortation of our Divine 
Master, "Let your loins be girt a- 
bout and your lamps burning, and 
you yourselves like men waiting 
for their master's return from the 
wedding, so that when he comes 
and knocks, they may straightway 
open to him." What an alluring 
hope is the promise which the Di- 
vine Master there attaches as the 
coveted reward for faithful vigil- 
ance: "Blessed are those servants 
whom the master, on his return, 
shall find watching. Amen, I say 
to you, he will gird himself, and 
will make them recline at table, and 
will come and serve them." (Lk. 
12, 25-37) 

This evangelical similitude de- 
scribes the death of Brother Mar- 
tin, known in the world as John 
Joseph Cavallotto, for he always 



lived as a faithful servant of the 
Lord, ever vigilant in expectation 
of the arrival of the heavenly 
Bridegroom. 

Born at Vinchio (Allessandria) 
on June 5, 1883, to Peter Cavallotto 
and Josephine Guastello, pious par- 
ents who were masters in the art 
of educating their many children 
in deep piety, John was endowed 
with an excellent spirit. This in- 
nate goodness, received as a heri- 
tage from excellent parents to their 
children, aided by grace, developed 
into a religious vocation, which de- 
termined young Joseph to follow in 
the footsteps of his elder brother 
Dominic, who had entered the Con- 
gregation about nine years previ- 
ously. Though accepted, he came 
to our novitiate at Pianezza early 
in 1898 as a cleric. He showed fine 
talent, but because of weakness of 



282 



his eyes, he had to give up his 
studies and embrace the duties of 
a lay-brother instead. Because of a 
character stamped with natural 
goodness and cultivated in a pro- 
found sense of piety, he quickly 
drew the benevolence of Superiors 
and novices. Indeed he merited the 
same. In this beginning of his re- 
ligious life Brother Martin under- 
stood profoundly that the value of 
the same consists in a continual 
preparation and vigilance for the 
coming of the divine Bridegroom: 
and for this end he bent all his 
energies and put to profit all his 
outstanding qualities. 

He united himself to God by the 
holy vows on the thirtieth of Aug- 
ust, 1899. 

According to the testimony of a 
confrere who knew him well, 
Brother Martin was in ideal Pas- 
sionist brother. He was a lover of 
work, obedient to his Superiors, 
respectful to the priests, affable 
and serviceable to all his confreres, 
most affectionate towards the Con- 
gregation and the traditions of our 
early fathers, and animated with 
the sublime spirit of sacrifice in 
all the various offices entrusted to 
him by holy obedience. These of- 
fices included that of the quest, 
cooking, tailoring, infirmarian, etc. 

Less than a year ago, at Basella, 
he could state that already he 
thought seriously of living with the 
thought of eternity, and of prepar- 
ing himself by the fervent exercise 



of virtue and greater intimacy with 
God for the great step which he 
foresaw was not far off, having 
experienced the destructive force 
of the illness which had taken hold 
of him. 

On the nineteenth of March 1940, 
he was finally taken to the Sani- 
torium of Pinerolo, and ten months 
later to the House of Providence 
at Turin. This happened through 
the insistence of Brother Martin 
himself, who, although he had im- 
proved somewhat at Pinerolo, nev- 
ertheless preferred Cottolengo, sole- 
ly in order to have the comfort of 
being closer to one of our retreats, 
and accordingly closer to his re- 
ligious brethren. 

The entire community of St. 
Pancratius was witness to the tran- 
quility of spirit, the perfect resig- 
nation to the will of God, and the 
ardent sentiments of gratitude 
which Brother Martin manifested 
for every little attention shown 
him, so much so that at times he 
was seen to weep with emotion 
when his brethren came to visit 
him. Ordinarily he was found with 
the Rosary in his hands; he re- 
ceived Holy Communion every 
morning, and although dispensed 
from the Eucharistic fast, he nev- 
ertheless tried to keep it, at great 
sacrifice to himself, out of the great 
devotion and the lively spirit of 
faith he had in the Blessed Sac- 
rament. He also had a special de- 
votion to his guardian angel who, 



283 



as Brother admitted, often helped 
him in particularly difficult circum- 
stances. 

Towards the end, Brother seemed 
to improve, and manifested his de- 
sire to be taken to St. Pancratius 
to celebrate the feast of our Holy 
Founder with his brethren. But it 
was the false improvement which 
is but a prelude to death. As a 
matter of fact, he suddenly grew 
worse, and the end came rapidly. 
Father Rector of St. Pancratius 
Retreat administered extreme unc- 
tion. Brother Martin received the 
last rites with full knowledge and 
great devotion on the afternoon of 
April 24th, the day before his 
death, at six o'clock in the evening. 
St. Paul of the Cross wanted him 
to celebrate his feast-day in Para- 
dise. 

The remains were transferred to 
St. Pancratius from Cottolengo, 
and rested in the retreat there for 



one day. After the singing of First 
Vespers for the feast of our Holy 
Founder, then were taken to the 
cemetery at Pianezza where, ac- 
cording to the earnest wish of 
Brother Martin, they rest together 
with his own father and two broth- 
ers, also Passionists: namely, Fa- 
ther Candido of St. Mark who died 
March thirty-first, 1918, Gonfrater 
Eugenio of the Mother of Fair 
Love, who died with the smile of 
the just on his lips in the Retreat 
of St. Pancratius on May twenty- 
ninth, 1911, at the age of twenty- 
one. The father of the three broth- 
ers was a good natured old man 
of the old school, who was at one 
time door-keeper of our retreat of 
St. Pancratius. 

Certainly in heaven they will 
continue to love our Congregation 
as they loved and served it on 
earth, showering down on it the 
choicest blessings of heaven. 



it is the will to pray that is the essence of prayer, and the desire 

to find God and to see Him and to love Him is the one thing that matters. 
If you have desired to know Him and love Him you have already done 
what was expected of you, and it is much better to desire God without 
being able to think clearly of Him, than to have marvelous thoughts 
about Him without desiring to enter into union with His will. 

Thomas Merton. 



284 




ACTA CONGREGATIONS 



Among the Pontifical Documents re- 
layed by the "Acta" we find one of- 
ficially informing the General Curia 
that Fr. Martin of the Heart of Jesus, 
C.P., member of the Sacred Congrega- 
tion of the Consistory, had been nomi- 
nated by the Holy Father as Apostolic 
Administrator of the new Prelature 
Nullius of Moyobamba in Peru. 

The last issue of the "Acta" also 
carries several decisions of the Gener- 
al Curia, a) The title of the German 
Vice-Province has been officially ap- 
proved to be : The Five Wounds of our 
Lord Jesus Christ, b) Approval of 
the Superiors of the Polish Vice-Pro- 
vince: Provincial: Fr. Julius of the 
Pure Heart of Mary; First Consultor: 
Fr. Michael of the Assumption; 
Second Consultor: Fr. Leo of our 
Lady of Mt. Carmel. c) In conse- 
quence of the tragic death of Fr. Mar- 
tin of the Holy Family, who was also 
Secretary of the Missions, the General 



Curia elected his successor, Fr. Vin- 
cent of the Sorrowful Mother also to 
the post of Secretary of the Missions. 
d) In order to legitimately come to 
Rome there must be a written permis- 
sion of one's proper Provincial, 
countersigned by Father General. This 
letter must be shown to the Highest 
Superior in Dignity at Sts. John and 
Paul when coming to Rome; non-ob- 
servance of this enactment is treat- 
ened with due punishment, e) The 
Preparatory Meeting held February 
2nd concerning the miracles ascribed 
to Bl. Vincent Mary Strambi was 
favorable to the cause. In an audience 
with the Holy Father the Promotor 
Fidei was told "ut ad ulteriora pro- 
cedatur". 

The financial report given by the 
General Postulation and the Secre- 
tariate of the Missions, to our Ameri- 
can eye looks rather meagre. It must 
also have seemed thus to the Secre- 



285 



tary of the Missions because his re- 
port is followed up by a "Monitum." 
The burden of the "Monitum" is that 
more interest should be shown in our 
Missions by helping them also ma- 
terially. He asks us, at least now and 
then, to offer a "free Mass" in favor 
of the Missions; he offers those Pro- 
vinces who are short on Stipends to 
supply them in favor of the Missions. 
He requests that all money offerings, 
sacred utensils, medicines and other 
things intended for our Missions, 
should be sent to Rome and from there 
would be distributed. He closes his 
appeal with emphatic words of Popes 
Benedict XV and Pius XI on helping 
the Missions. 

The Sectio Historica is again taken 
up in the Acta after a break of more 



than five years. The historical sketch 
of the Bulgarian Mission is quite 
timely; it tells us that the Mission was 
always a difficult one. 

The Statistical Table shows that of 
January 1948 the Congregation had 18 
Provinces and 2 Vice-Provinces. Five 
Provinces in Italy, Three in Spain, 
Two in the United States and one in 
the following countries: England, 
France, Argentina, Belgium, Aus- 
tralia, Holland, Brazil and Ireland. 
The two Vice Provinces are in Germ- 
any and Poland. There is a total of 
2,176 professed Fathers; 530 Students 
professed and 582 Brothers. There 
are 166 Retreats. 

Other items of interest of this last 
issue of the "Acta" have been given in 
former issues of "The Passionist". 



PROVINCIAL CURIA 



Chicago, 111. 
April 17, 1949. 

Dear Father Rector; 

We would take the occasion of the 
great feasts of Our Holy Founder and 
St. Joseph to remind all of the con- 
stant necessity of prayer for the wel- 
fare of the Province, and in particular 
to urge all to pray for an increase of 
vocations. 

With this thought in mind, we direct 
that public prayers be said for the 
blessing of an increase of vocations. 

Let there be said, in the Triduum to 
Our Holy Founder, the following 
prayers for vocations to the priest- 
hood: 

1. The Litany of Loretto, with ver- 
sicle and prayer. 

2. One Pater, Ave and Gloria, with 



the proper antiphon, versicle and 

prayer, in honor of Our Holy 

Patrons: St. Michael, St. Joseph, 

Our Holy Founder, St. Gabriel 

and Blessed Vincent Mary 

Strambi. 

We also direct that a Triduum be 

held during the days of May 1st, 2nd 

and 3rd in preparation for the feast 

of the Solemnity of St. Joseph. This 

Triduum may be held during the first 

half hour of prayer on May 2nd and 

3rd. Let the following prayers be said 

for vocations to the brotherhood: 

1. The Litany of St. Joseph, with 
versicle and prayer. 

2. One Pater, Ave and Gloria, with 
the proper antiphon, versicle and 
prayer, in honor of our Holy Pa- 
trons: St. Michael, St. Joseph, 



286 



Our Holy Founder, St. Gabriel 
and Blessed Vincent Mary 
Strambi. 
Wishing you every blessing, I am, 
Fraternally, 

James Patrick, C.P. 



STS. JOHN AND PAUL 

Father General returned from his 
long visitation tour on March 27th, by 
plane from Australia. In the senti- 
ment that evening His Paternity ex- 
pressed his joy in finding such an in- 
terest in and love for St. Paul of the 
Cross in the Provinces he visited. 

From February 22 to March 1 old 
and blind Father Modesto, whom 
many of the Fathers who spent some 
time in Rome will remember, con- 
ducted the annual retreat for the Com- 
munity in Sts. John and Paul. 

Work on the facade of the Basilica 
has been stopped as now it has been 
ascertained that the old choir was 
build as early as the 12th century and 
that makes it an archeological monu- 
ment. It was discovered that the ad- 
dition was at the same time as the 
campanile, and in the 16th century 
converted into a choir, not built at 
this date as was formerly thought. 
Whether the facade with an open por- 
tico and enclosed quarters (quondam 
choir) above or the ancient original 
facade will be restored, has not been 
decided. In the meantime the "sum- 
mer chapel" on the second floor, with 
new stalls, is being used as the choir. 



Day this year was as glorious for our 
Saint in the spot where he went to his 
eternal reward, as in previous years. 
The day was a clear, balmy Italian 
spring day. Crowds from the neigh- 
boring villages were there to pay their 
respects to their Saint. At 9:00 A.M. 
the Bishop of Teramo, His Excellency 
Vincent Gilla Gremigni, arrived; was 
received by the Community and the 
Populace in the portico of the Basili- 
ca. Immediately His Excellency began 
the General Communion Mass at 
which he preached and distributed 
Holy Communion for well over an 
hour. At 11:00 A.M. the solemn High 
Mass was sung by Father Casimir, 
C.P., Editor of the "Eco", the periodi- 
cal of St. Gabriel. Towards evening 
Solemn Vespers were sung, another 
homily on the Saint preached and the 
veneration of the relic. 



PROVINCE OF THE PIETA 

(N. Italy) 

A correspondent from Isola del 
Gran Sasso tells us that St. Gabriel's 



ST. PAUL OF THE CROSS 
PROVINCE 

(East U.S.A.) 

Fr. Herbert of the Cross died on 
Dec. 28th and on Dec. 31st, 1948 was 
buried in the cemetery of Holy Cross 
Seminary after a solemn funeral 
Mass celebrated by our Very Rev. 
Fr. Provincial. Thus closed the tem- 
poral history of a religious and priest 
of our province whose life has been 
distinguished by zeal, energy and Pas- 
sionist spirit in all the employments to 
which he had been assigned as mis- 
sionary, superior, chaplain and lector. 

Fr. Herbert's secular name was 
Arthur Young. He was born in Nor- 
mandy, Ontario, Canada, on June 2nd, 
1902 and was the youngest of the ten 
children of William and Margaret 
Lynch Young. He was baptized in the 



287 



parish church at Ayton on June 14th 
immediately following his birth. He 
received his primary education in the 
local "separate school" and made his 
high school course at St. Jerome's 
College, Kitchener, Ontario, an institu- 
tion of the Fathers of the Resurrec- 
tion. In September, 1923, he entered 
our preparatory college in Dunkirk, 
N.Y. He made his novitiate in St. 
Paul's Monastery, Pittsburgh, Pa., and 
was professed as Jeremiah of the 
Cross on Aug. 15th, 1925. His name 
was changed to Herbert during his 
student life. He was ordained to the 
holy priesthood on Feb. 8th, 1931, in 
our Monastery church, Jamaica, L. I., 
by the Most Rev. John J. Dunne, 
Auxiliary Bishop of New York, and 
after completing the course in sacred 
eloquence was assigned to our then 
recent foundation in Toronto. 

During the first seven years of his 
priestly life Fr. Herbert was exclu- 
sively occupied in mission and retreat 
work. Then in 1938 he was appointed 
Vice-Rector of Our Lady of Sorrows 
Retreat, West Springfield, Mass. In 
1939 the Provincial Curia elected him 
to the rectorship of St. Paul's Retreat, 
Pittsburgh, Pa., to fill out the unex- 
pired term of the late Fr. Anselm, who 
had resigned his office because of ill- 
health. In the Provincial Chapter of 
1941 he was elected Rector of St. 
Michael's, Union City, N. J. Because 
of failing health he resigned his pas- 
sive voice in the Chapter of 1944. Not 
long after this he was assigned as 
chaplain to St. Agnes' Hospital. While 
serving in this capacity his health sud- 
denly took a bad turn, so that he was 
a patient in the same institution for 
several weeks. 



After his discharge as a patient 
from the hospital Fr. Herbert was re- 
lieved of his onerous post of chaplain 
and was sent to Holy Cross, Dunkirk, 
to recuperate. Not long after his ar- 
rival in Dunkirk he suffered a severe 
heart attack, which caused him to be 
hospitalized for eighteen weeks. When 
he returned to Holy Cross his health 
was sufficiently recovered to permit 
him to take a light teaching assign- 
ment. By September, 1947, he was 
able to assume a fuller schedule of 
classes, to serve as one of the regular 
confessors of the postulants and oc- 
casionally to preach. 

On December 11, 1948, Fr. Herbert 
was suddenly seized with a hemor- 
rhage and had to be removed to the 
hospital with all speed. There after 
some days of medication, X-rays and 
blood-transfusions, he underwent a 
surgical operation, before which at his 
own request he had received the last 
sacraments of the Church. All went 
well with the patient for a few days, 
but when he began to take food he was 
unable to retain it. The resulting 
vomiting spells reopened the wound of 
the operation, so that he was required 
to undergo another severe surgical 
ordeal. After Fr. Herbert was re- 
turned from the operating room the 
doctors advised that he be prepared 
for death as there was no chance of 
his recovery. Holy Viaticum was ad- 
ministered on Dec. 27th and he died 
at 1:30 A.M. on the following day. 

The life of Fr. Herbert was dis- 
tinguished not so much by what he did 
as by the zeal and trust in God with 
which he performed the tasks assigned 
him. 

He received the inspiration to enter 



288 



our congregation on the occasion of a 
mission that was given by one of our 
Fathers in Ayton, Ontario. The deci- 
sion to follow this inspiration was a 
difficult one for Arthur Young to 
make, but he made it in the way that 
was characteristic of the future Fa- 
ther Herbert. The motive that finally 
moved him was his desire to be a 
preacher of Jesus Crucified. And this 
ambition was a compelling force 
during the formative years of his Pas- 
sionist education. After his death, it 
was found that during all his years as 
a postulant, novice and student he 
gathered voluminous notes, culled from 
his reading, of ideas and striking 
turns of thought that enabled him 
later on to present the word of God 
efficiently and forcefully on the mis- 
sion platform. His work in after 
years proved how fruitful this zealous 
industry was. Still on file are letters 
sent to Fr. Provincial by the clergy 
and the religious communities giving 
account of the good work done by Fr. 
Herbert during his ministrations 
among them. 

Those who knew him were witnesses 
of the fraternal charity and love for 
the congregation that guided him as 
superior. He prayed earnestly and 
constantly for the divine aid to dis- 
charge his office properly. Every im- 
portant decision that had to be made 
regarding the good of the community 
was preceded by a novena of masses. 

During the latter years of his life 
especially, he was a living example of 
the admonition of Ecclesiasticus, 
"work your work before the time, and 
God will reward you in his time." 
(Ecclus 50:38) He so carefully con- 
served his bodily strength for the 



tasks that were given him that he was 
able to accomplish his duties without 
interruptioon despite his infirm health. 
The courage and self-discipline that 
this constant attention to health re- 
quired was a real cross to him, as he 
revealed during his last illness when 
he confided to visiting brethren: "I do 
not wish to grumble or complain; I 
want whatever God wants; but truly 
I am becoming very weary of being an 
invalid." 

Pursuing the first inspiration that 
prompted him to enter the congrega- 
tion, Father Herbert, regardless of 
what office he held, always thought of 
himself as a preacher of the Passion. 
He lapsed into the unconsciousness 
that preceded his death reciting the 
vocal prayers he was accustomed to 
say before preaching. It is fitting 
therefore that the end of his life 
should take the form of a sermon. He 
was surprised and grateful when he 
survived the first operation; and as 
soon as he was able to recognize the 
Fathers who were attending him, he 
exclaimed: "Oh, if our boys could only 
be made to realize how worth-while 
it all is! I have had much time to 
think, lying here; and I realize now 
how trivial were some of the things 
that annoyed me. They are nothing in 
comparison with the kindness I have 
received. If God spares me, I shall 
push a little harder to try to get this 
idea across." 

On the afternooon of December 
27th, when the prayers for the dying 
had been recited Father Herbert calm- 
ly bad farewell to his nephew and to 
each of the priests who were present. 
He then thanked Fr. Rector for his 
personal kindness, and expressed his 



289 



gratitude for all the kindness he had 
received from the congregation. 
Within minutes he closed his eyes on 
the world for the last time, and after 
a few hours he breathed out his soul 
to God who gave it. 



Small matters in the polite give and 
take of human intercourse, arranged 
with thoughtful consideration and 
good will to reconcile conflicting in- 
terests, are often the means of 
winning new friends and holding old 
ones. This seems to be the moral of 
the incident which was considered im- 
portant enough to be included in the 
regular column of the Society for the 
Propagation of the Faith in The 
Tablet of Brooklyn, N. Y. The item 
in question appeared in the issue of 
January 29, 1949 and tells what hap- 
pened when Fr. Owen Doyle, C.P., 
pastor of our Jamaica monastery 
parish requested Msgr. J. J. Boardman 
to advance the date of an intended 
membership drive in our Immaculate 
Conception parish for the diocesan 
branch of the Propagation of the 
Faith. Here is the main part of the 
story as it was told in the society's 
column in the Tablet. 

"It all happened with Father Owen 
of the Passionist Fathers explaining to 
Msgr. Boardman via the telephone 
that he could not possibly entertain 
the thought of having a membership 
drive on the last Sunday of January. 
Things looked dismal. If any parish 
in the Diocese could be counted on for 
helpful cooperation, certainly it should 
be the Passionist parish in Jamaica, 
for the Passionists are well repre- 
sented both in the foreign and home 
mission field, with many of their own 



men actively engaged in mission 
work 

"Fr. Owen called, not to cancel the 
drive but simply to advance the date 
one Sunday so that it would not con- 
flict with the reading of their annual 
parochial report to the parishioners. 
Not only was the drive to be advanced 
but the Society for the Propagation of 
the Faith was invited to send its own 
representative to conduct the appeal 
for members at the Immaculate Con- 
ception parish in Jamaica. 

"As a matter of fact, the date of 
January 23 was agreed upon and 
proved very satisfactory to Msgr. 
Boardman and to Father Owen as 
well. It was not until the drive had 
been completed that the Diocesan 
Director fully appreciated just how 
satisfactory the arrangement was. In 
response to the society's appeal for 
members over 1,600 of the Immaculate 
Conception parishioners joined or re- 
newed their membership in the Society 
for the Propagation of the Faith. 

"For this wonderful spirit of co- 
operation manifested both by the 
priests of the parish and the people, 
Msgr. Boardman and the Society for 
the Propagation of the Faith are ex- 
tremely grateful By becoming 

members of the Holy Father's Mis- 
sion Aid Society, the good people of 
the Passionist Parish have pledged 
their prayerful support and their ma- 
terial assistance to many missionaries. 
It is our prayerful hope that Almighty 
God will bless abundantly the efforts 
of the Passionist Fathers locally and 
follow these courageous sons of St. 
Paul of the Cross throughout all of 
their home and foreign mission assign- 
ments. Thanks ever so much to Fa- 



290 



ther Owen Doyle and his confreres at 
the Passionist Monastery. 



One of the heartening signs of the 
times was the recent unanimity with 
which people of high and low degree 
rallied to the defence of Hungary's 
persecuted Primate, Josef Cardinal 
Mindszenty, whom the Hungarian 
Reds, in a trial that was a mockery of 
all justice, railroaded to jail and would 
have railroaded to the firing squad if 
they had dared. The Passionists, 
thank God, were creditably repre- 
sented in the host of the Cardinal's 
defenders through the help given by 
Fr. Fabian Flynn by photographs and 
an article, to The Tablet of Brooklyn, 
N. Y. That high-grade Catholic 
weekly, in its issue of February 12, 
1949, featured the heroic Cardinal's 
cause and gave front page prominence 
to Fr. Fabian's contributions. 

A very good and interesting photo- 
graph shows Fr. Fabian at an inter- 
view with Cardinal Mindszenty in the 
Cardinal's residence in Budapest. The 
comment printed under the picture 
highlights in an effective way the im- 
portance of Fr. Fabian's article, which 
was evidently regarded as a very im- 
portant contribution. The comment 
runs as follows: "Fully aware of his 
approaching arrest and imprisonment, 
Josef Cardinal Mindszenty, Primate of 
Hungary, last Summer discussed .... 
calmly the plight of his people and 
their even more wretched future with 
Father Fabian Flynn, C.P., director 
of War Relief Services— N.C.W.C., in 
charge of distributing American food 
and clothing to the Hungarian people. 
A few days after this picture was 
taken, Father Fabian was expelled 



from Hungary by the Communist 
regime. His personal relations with 
the Cardinal are related in another 
column on this page." 

As everyone knows by now the 
worst expectations of Cardinal Mind- 
szenty have been completely fulfilled. 
What Fr. Fabian had to say on the 
tragedy of the Cardinal's trial and 
condemnation by the Red Hungarian 
court cannot be printed here, as we 
would be very happy to do, because of 
its length. We call attention to it for 
the sake of the record and because the 
author deserves high praise for the 
manner in which he presented his ma- 
terial in so worthy a cause. 

An additional personal note on Fr. 
Fabian may here be added. On 
Wednesday, April 20th after a stay 
of seven months here in his home 
country, he sailed from New York on 
the Queen Mary to resume his duties 
as delegate for the War Relief 
Services of the National Catholic Wel- 
fare Conference in Austria. During 
these months of his visit in the States 
he has been busily engaged in helping 
the campaign for the Bishops' Fund 
for the Victims of War, which cam- 
paign is being conducted in the New 
York Archdiocese from April 24th to 
May 1st. 



The present situation of the Chinese 
people, although very obscure, is clear 
enough to enable us to conjecture that 
anything may happen from day to 
day. By the same token we have every 
reason to fear that anything can hap- 
pen from day to day to our mission- 
aries in China. 

Quite recently this fact was brought 
home to us in a rather startling way 



291 



by news our Very Rev. Fr. Provincial 
Gabriel received by letter from Fr. 
Quentin, superior of our missionaries 
in China. This news was communi- 
cated to all our Brethren by a circular 
letter dated March 16th in which Fr. 
Provincial says : "I Have just received 
a rather disturbing letter from Father 
Quentin Olwell, C.P., relative to our 
missions in China. 

"Up to the time of the arrival of 
Father Quentin's letter, all informa- 
tion from our Bishop and the other 
missionaries indicated that things 
were quite normal in our territory. 
The major difficulty was the getting 
of funds up to our missions to carry 
on the work of the Church. Due to 
the upset conditions in so many parts 
of China, a financial upheaval was the 
natural result. 

"Father Quentin's letter, dated 
March 3rd, 1949, brings the shocking 
information that Yuanling has been 
taken by adherents of the Reds. This 
certainly indicates a very sudden 
change in our mission territory. Evi- 
dently Yanling fell as a result of a 
well-planned coup. Father Quentin 
says there was some fighting and a 
few places were burned. Apparently 
there was no military operation of any 
great importance. Father Quentin 
goes on to say that the whole 
Northern section of Hunan, including 
Yungshun, Wangstun, Paotsing and 
probably Yungsui, besides Yuanling, 
are in the hands of those who are con- 
nected with the main group of the Red 
Army forces. At the time of his 
writing, Father Quentin stated that 
Chenki expected to fall in a day or 
two. Kaotsun had been taken but Su- 
pu and Chihking were still safe. 



"Father Dunstan had been in Chen- 
ki for about two weeks but on the day 
.of writing, namely, March 4th, Father 
Quentin was sending him to Chih- 
kiang, if he could get his jeep oper- 
ating. The Post Office in Chenki has 
been closed, and Father Dunstan was 
to take a few last letters to be mailed 
from Chihkiang. The arrival of Fa- 
ther Quentin's letter would seem to in- 
dicate that Father Dunstan got 
through to Chihkiang all 'rightLr. .. e" 

"Father Quen.tin states that he has 
not been able to get any information 
concerning just what had happened at 
Yuanling. He is ignorant of the fate 
of the Bishop, our missionaries and 
the Sisters. Because of the hospital 
and schools being operated under mis- 
sion auspices, Father Quentin felt that 
everything would be all right with the 
mission personnel, at least for the time 
being. 

"Father Quentin further states that 
since this appears to be a long term 
affair, he has decided to stay in Chenki 
and see if he can carry on no matter 
what happens. He feels that if he 
can get through^ the first few days 
when excitement will be running high, 
there is a very good chance that he 
will be able to effect a "modus Vi- 
vendi" with the leaders of this move- 
ment. 

"There has been absolutely no news 
of this affair in our American news- 
papers. Judging from Father Quen- 
tin's report, it would seem that the 
local adherents of the Reds have taken 
over and this with very little re- 
sistance. There has been no indica- 
tion that there has been any change in 
the situation at Changsha, the capital 
of the Province, and so it is possible 



292 



that in time Nationalist troops will be 
sent to drive out the local usurpers in 
our mission territory. 

"I have previously been informed on 
very good authority that Hunan was 
one of the provinces which the Na- 
tionalists plan to hold at any cost. 
Consequently, it was a great shock to 
get the news related above. Of course, 
it is too early to judge adequately of 
the changed situation. We shall just 
have to wait until we are able to get 
further information. 

"In his letter, Father Quentin asks 
for some extra prayers for the welfare 
of the Bishop, the Missionaries, the 
Sisters and the Christians of our mis- 
sion territory in Hunan." 

On the face of it this communication 
looked like another chapter of dis- 
aster in the history of our China mis- 
sions. Fortunately, Fr. Provincial 
was able to follow up this foreboding 
news within twenty-four hours with 
more cheerful supplementary informa- 
tion. 

In this later letter Fr. Provincial 
informs us as follows: "I am pleased 
to report .... that upon my return to 
Union City this morning, there was 
awaiting me a cable from Bishop 
Cuthbert O'Gara. This cable had been 
filed at Shangsha, the capital of Hu- 
nan Province. Evidently someone had 
got through to that city. This fact 
seems to confirm my opinion that the 
trouble in Yuanling and the other mis- 
sion cities is more or less of a local 
nature caused by local bandits who are 
adherents of the Reds. Bishop Cuth- 
bert's cable reads as follows: 'DIOCE- 
SAN PERSONNEL SAFE. YUAN- 
LING MISSION UNDAMAGED. 



CITY PARTIALLY DESTROYED 
AND COMPLETELY PILLAGED. 
(SIGNED) CUTHBERT' 

"I am sure that we are all very 
pleased to know that the mission per- 
sonnel is in no immediate danger. Let 
us hope that in the very near future 
something like normal conditions will 
be restored. ..." 

On April 13th Fr. Provincial was 
able to send us detailed information on 
what had happened in our mission ter- 
ritory in Hunan. He forwarded to us 
copies of a diary of ten closely typed 
pages which had been sent to him 
from Yuanling. It had been written 
by one of the missionaries in the epis- 
copal city and covers the thirteen days 
from February 27th to March 11th. 
It answers most of the questions that 
had been raised by the earlier more 
general information. Here are some 
of the high-lights taken from the con- 
clusion of the Diary. They give at 
least some idea of the end result of the 
bandit invasion of Hunan. 

On Yuanling: "Yuanling has been 
so stripped few business men can start 
up again on their former scale. Be- 
sides, they are afraid bandits may re- 
turn once the soldiers decide to go. To 
add to the pessimism the Central 
Bank of China and the Bank of Com- 
munications have moved out of town. 
This is a big setback which will affect 
business (in a way) similar to the 
closing of the larger shops. Merchants 
of the larger stores are closing for 
safer places down the river. There 
is talk of the telephone being discon- 
tinued and the electric plant closing 
up, but these are only rumors. What 
is certain is that the city has been 



293 



so hard hit it will take a long time for 
it to recover. As Fr. Linus puts it, 
Yuanling has gone from the twentieth 
century to the Middle Ages in a few 

short days But in their looting 

of Yuanling the bandits lost their ulti- 
mate aim, complete control of Hsiang- 
Hsi, at least for the present. They are 
now back in the north country with 
hopes of getting to Changteh slim in 
the immediate future. As it is, the 
Government troops are in charge, and 
as long as they maintain their garri- 
son here the bandits will most likely 
keep at a safe distance." 

On the object of the bandit inva- 
sion: "Now that news is trickling in 
from the other missions it is evident 
the attack of Yuanling was just one 
part of a larger scheme. Under the 
leadership of the Yungshun bandits it 
looks like all Hsiang-Hsi bandits were 
in league to have northwest Hunan 
ruled by men from northwest Hunan. 
Thus they banded together to drive 
out all non-Hsiang-Hsi magistrates 
and political leaders ..." 

On the state of particular missions: 
"News from Paotsing and Wangstun 
indicates a turnover in government, 
with the towns going over to the 
bandits. ... To date the worst news 
came via a telegram from Yungsui. 
Fr. Ronald wired that on March 17 
the Mission and church were destroyed 
.... The telegram merely said "de- 
stroyed." There has been no other 
news, so the extent of damage done 
the Yungsui Mission is still unknown. 
For Yuanling and for the Mission the 
whole affair has been a tragedy. What 
the effect on the outlying Missions will 
be it is too soon to say as we have had 



little communication since the trouble; 
started." 

In his covering letter sent with the* 
copy of the Diary Fr. Provincial says : 
"I am sure that with the knowledge of 
the hazards which our missionaries' 
are facing, we shall all be glad to give 
them a special memento in our prayers 
and masses." This appeal for prayers 
is all the more timely now that the 
headlines of the secular press at this 
very moment are announcing the re- 
newal of the Red drive against the 
Nationalist Government and the cross- 
ing of the Yangzte River. This means 
that, unless a miracle happens, the 
Chinese Capital of Nanking will soon 
be in their hands. The end of the 
Nationalist Government in China and 
the triumph of the Chinese Reds can- 
not be far off. What this eventuality 
is going to mean for our missions it is 
not difficult to foresee, if any credence 
at all is to be given to the reported 
ruthlessness the Reds have meted out 
to church personnel and institutions 
in the areas they have already occu- 
pied. Nevertheless we may be sure 
that the impossible can and will hap- 
pen in God's merciful Providence if 
we endeavor to deserve his interven- 
tion by our prayers and good works 
offered on behalf of our missions and 
missionaries in China. 



The new addition to the Retreat 
House in Brighton is making good 
progress; the first floor is under way. 
In Pittsburgh the roof is on the new 
chapel and the steel girders for the 
roof on the new addition to the mon- 
astery have been placed. The whole 



294 



aBHHMHM 




Monastery of the new Passionist Teaching Brothers, in the 
Belgian Congo, showing the four professed brothers, and 
eight postulants, with their Director. 

Interior of the Passionist Church at Tshumbe Ste Marie, 
Belgian Congo. This Mission is staffed mainly by the Belgian 
Passionists. 




295 



construction in Pittsburgh is expected 
to be ready for occupancy by Septem- 
ber. Approval of the general plans 
for the new Monastery and Retreat 
House in Hartford has been granted; 
so far no work on the building has 
been started. 

"The Passionist" wishes to extend 
its sincerest Congratulations to the 
eight Reverend Fathers who have been 
raised to the Priesthood in West 
Springfield, May 4th. Ad multos 
benedictos annos! 



PALESTINE 

Father Albert, C.P. writes from 
Bethany that at present (March 24th) 
things are quiet, and expresses the 





Fr. John Salah, C.P. one of the first 
Arab Passionists, who was killed on 
May 19, 1948, by a sniper's bullet, 
near Bethany. 



Confrater Hermenegild of Jesus, 
C.P., who has the distinction of be- 
ing the first Negro Passionist. He 
was recently professed at Penaran- 
da de Duero (Burgos) in the 
Spanish Province of the Most 
Precious Blood. 



hope they will continue so and asks 
prayers to this effect, especially for 
Bethany. 

An enclosure with the letter con- 
sisted of a sheet edited by the "World 
Truth League, Jerusalem". The de- 
scription of the condition of the holy 
places in Jerusalem after the invasion 
of Jewish forces is unrepeatable. The 
destruction was not only athetistic and 
barbarious but even beastly and in- 
human, unbelievable in our day of 
"culture". 



296 



I 



any Dignitaries assisted at 
e recent blessing of the 
nurch of the Passionist Fa- 
kers, in Havana, Cuba, the 
terior of which is shown at 
le right. Among those 
? esent were His Excellency, 
ishop Edward Dalmau, C.P., 
ho preached an inspiring 
srmon at the ceremonies. 




PROVINCE OF THE HOLY CROSS 



IMMACULATE 
CONCEPTION RETREAT 

(Chicago) 

The Feast of St. Thomas brought 
the second of our new series of Thom- 
istic Symposiums. The senior class of 
Students starred with papers treating 
"De Deo Uno". Father Joseph Mary 
was most pleased to see how enthusi- 
astically they had delved into their 
material, so much so indeed that some 
of the Students had to shorten their 
papers for lack of time. At any rate, 
a good and enlightening time was had 
by all, and the "juniors" are eagerly 
awaiting their chance next year. 

The Passionists accepted the invita- 
tion of the Dominican Students this 
year and attended their "circle" treat- 
ing the definability of Mary's Assump- 
tion. The program included some very 
beautifully rendered Gregorian selec- 
tions as well as the exposition and de- 



fense of the main thesis, in Latin. 
The sons of St. Dominic appeared to 
be just as edified at our academic 
interests as were the sons of St. Paul 
of the Cross at their intense spirit of 
study and eagerness for learning. 

Perhaps the residence of the Pro- 
vincial Curia here instills an atmos- 
phere that begets or rears up men of 
authority. Anyhow, we turned out 
two ready-made Vicars recently. Fr. 
Gordian relinquished his provincial 
secretariate to Fr. Conell to go to 
Louisville as Vice-Rector, and Fr. 
Benet left us to take up the like posi- 
tion in Detroit. Should we say: ad 
multos annos? 

Brother Bernard has furnished us 
with a new hired man from St. Louis 
in the person of Mr. Ollie Stillman. 
We like him, and hope that the feel- 
ing stays mutual. A final bit of news 
is the new lockers that are soon to be 
constructed alongside the pool. 

12<)7 



HOLY CROSS RETREAT 

(Cincinnati) 

Holy Cross is happy to welcome Fr. 
Emmanuel to its ranks. We know the 
power of his oratory will make the 
name of the Passionists greater in 
Cincinnati. Fathers Aurelius and 
Leopold have spent some days in Good 
Samaritan Hospital; the former for 
his heart, the latter for an operation. 

We wonder how Fr. Nicholas can 
keep his languages straight: — on the 
first Thursday of each month he hears 
Confessions in the morning in English 
at St. Leo's, in Chinese at Mount St. 
Joseph, and in German at St. Henry's 
across the river in the evening. This 
zealous Chinese Missionary works 
hard for God's Glory wherever he is. 

More than 1300 men have made the 
closed Retreats at Holy Cross. The 
first year of its existence, the groups 
averaged 17 men each week; this 
second year — so far — they are aver- 
aging 23 men each week. Fr. Carl's 
presence enables either the Retreat 
Director or himself to get out and 
preach at all the Masses of a Parish 
soon to be on Retreat — this especially 
has boosted the attendance. A 
Banquet for Retreatants is being 
planned for June to celebrate the 
second Anniversary of Laymen's Re- 
treats on Mount Adams. 



SACRED HEART RETREAT 

( Isouisville ) 

The principal item of news for this 
issue of the Passionist regards our 
change of Vicars. Early in January 
news reached us that Father Gordian 
would replace Father Emmanuel in 
that role. This change became an ac- 
complished fact on March 1, the day 



before Ash Wednesday. While re- 
gretting the loss of Father Em- 
manuel's genial spirit, the Community 
feels that he has been replaced by a 
worthy successor. 

The winter here was the mildest in 
years with the result that not a few of 
the brethren had their turn as vic-i 
tims of colds and flu. Nearly all cases] 
were of brief duration though, and 
only one, Confrater Randal, had to bej 
taken to the hospital. By the next] 
day he was much improved and it was 
not long before he returned to thei 
monastery. 

March 7th was a red letter day for 
the Students. On that day the mail 
brought a letter from Father Pro- 
vincial bearing the definite news of I 
the date of Ordination. On June 11th, 
five of our Students will be ordained 
priests and six others will become 
Subdeacons. The ceremony will be 
held in Louisville's Cathedral of the 
Assumption, since on the same day the 
Archbishop will ordain his own men 
to the priesthood. 

Friday March 11th, this Retreat 
was the scene of the death of Father 
Isidore, another one of the pillars of 
our province. Father had enjoyed 
unusually good health, despite his 
eighty-two years. About four days be- 
fore his death, however, he began to 
decline very noticeably, so that it was 
no surprise when he was found dead 
in bed on March 11th. His was the 
singular privilege of saying Mass on 
the last day of his mortal life. As 
providence would have it, Father 
Rector found it necessary to tell him 
the night before he died that he could 
not say Mass the next morning. With 
his accustomed .docility he accepted 



298 



this cross, not knowing that Mass 
time the next morning would find him 
in eternity. Ordained in Argentina, 
Father spent several years in that 
country laboring for the newly estab- 
lished province there before returning 
to his native land and province. In 
the opinion of those who knew him at 
his greatest, Father Isidore was one 
of the best, if not the best missionary 
the Passionists have ever had in 
America. According to the testimony 
of our elders, his originality of ex- 
pression was un-paralleled and his 
success phenomenal both as a mis- 
sionary and as a retreat master. 
Many of us knew him only as a broken 
down old man and had to rely on the 
testimony of others for a real pic- 
ture of him. But though we did not 
know him as a wonderful missionary 
and retreat master, we did, neverthe- 
less, enjoy the fruit of his example as 
a man of prayer, meekness and hu- 
mility. Surely this patriarch of Holy 
Cross Province is already enjoying the 
reward of his untiring labors. 

St. Agnes School is now under roof, 
and there seems to be no obstacle in 
sight to hinder its occupancy in Sep- 
tember. 

The Feast of our Holy .Founder was 
the most glorious spring day up to 
that particular date in Louisville. It 
probably was part cause of the in- 
creased number of faithful that at- 
tended the services and paid their re- 
spects to St. Paul in St. Agnes church. 
The festive sermon was delivered by 
Rev. Fr. Spalding, from St. Columba's 
in the city, during the solemn High 
Mass whose celebrant was Fr. Anselm, 
O.F.M., Superior and pastor of St. 
Boniface in the city. Among the 



dignitaries assisting in the sanctuary 
Most Reverend James Fox, Abbot of 
Gethsemani stood out prominently 
with his white Abbatial robes. 



OUR LADY OF 
GOOD COUNSEL 

(St. Louis) 

The busy Lenten Season drew to a 
solemn close with the ceremonies of 
Holy Week. During these services the 
choir under the able direction of Fr. 
Cronan did much to bring about the 
effect the Church intends. 

During the week-end of April 28th 
studies were put aside to celebrate the 
Feast of our Holy Founder, plus the 
Feast Days of V. Rev. Fr. Rector and 
Director. The traditional field-meet 
provided the boys with ample oppor- 
tunities to display their athletic 
talents and possibilities in vying for 
the coveted prizes. 

The Community rejoiced and con- 
gratulated Bishop Helmsing on his 
elevation to the Episcopacy. Bishop 
Helmsing, as Director of the Propaga- 
tion of the Faith in the Archdiocese 
of St. Louis, among other favors, also 
permitted our Fathers to preach for 
the Colored Missions in the Arch- 
diocese. 

ST. FRANCIS RETREAT 

(St. Patd, Ks.) 

The Community of St. Francis 
Monastery made the Annual Retreat 
from February 22nd to March 1st. 
The Providence of God was very good 
to us in sending Very Rev. Father 
Berchmans, C.P., Second Consulter 
from the Province of St. Paul of The 
Cross, as our Retreat-Master. His 
many years of experience as Master 



299 



of Novices was manifested in the 
very thoroughly Passionistic Retreat 
which he conducted. We want to take 
this occasion to thank Father Berch- 
mans publicly for his excellent Re- 
treat and for all his kindness to us. 

The Retreat was a very fitting 
preparation for the Lenten work 
which our Missionaries had under- 
taken. All the regular Missionaries 
from our Retreat were busy all during 
Lent. Even the Vice-Master had his 
chance to go out on a Mission. 

As usual, the Holy Week Services 
in the Novitiate House were conducted 
with full solemnity. The Ceremonies 
began with the Blessing of Palms, 
Solemn Mass, and Solemn singing of 
the Passion on Palm Sunday. The 
full Liturgy of Holy Week was carried 
out very beautifully. The numbers 
here may be small, but the care and 
diligence and enthusiasm shown by the 
Novices was a real source of edifica- 
tion. 

The weather has been typical 
Kansas weather — an admixture of fine 
Spring days and chill rainy days. 
However, the mixture was suitably 
arranged, so that Brother Philip has 
been able to get a good start on the 
Spring planting. Brother Philip has 
been ably assisted by Brother George 
in laying out the garden, while 
Brother Thomas has taken over the 
full-time job of Cook. 



ST. GABRIEL'S RETREAT 

(D(s Moitns) 

Items of interest from Des Moines 
this time are not only scanty; they are 
practically non-existent. 

The students recreation room has 



been improved tremendously. Thi 
two cells next to it were convertei 
into one large, bright class-room. J 
door was placed in the wall to joii 
the recreation with the class-room 
which serves very conveniently for i 
record-room. The demolishing an< 
construction crews were Fr. Recto: 
and the students. 

On St. Thomas' day, the five mem 
bers of the third year held then 
symposium. Uunlike previous semi 
nars, the subject matter this year was 
a single topic — a problem in the His 
tory of Philosophy. The entire com- 
munity was present, and although th( 
papers were very studious, the evening 
was both enlightening and entertain- 
ing. 

To those of us who have lived in the 
community in years past, this Holj 
Week was one that will not be forgot- 
ten. For the first time in years we 
had the entire services. We would 
challenge any house in the Province 
to match our ceremonies in beauty, 
smoothness or devotion. Needless tc 
say, most of the credit goes to the 
students. 

For months now our nights rest 
has been broken by the shouts of a 
group of leather-lunged teen-agers. 
Around 12: o'clock they get out in 
front of the house and begin their 
little act. Recently their language has 
become filthier. But noise is some- 
thing we should be accustomed to by 
now. The corner out in front gets 
busier every day. During any five 
minute period of the night you can 
count as many cars or loud diesel- 
engined trucks roaring by. The drive- 
in across the street keeps things lively 
for the first three hours of the night. 



300 



rhe owner has just doubled the size of 
lis building, and has applied for a 
)eer license. Things promise to be- 
:ome even livelier in the future. They 
ire building 21 new homes on the op- 
posite corner. 



Northwest a sick man. While up and 
around now, he had suffered a great 
deal from a severe attack of 
"shingles". 



MATER DOLOROSA 
RETREAT 

(Sierra Madre) 

Except for the chapel, the shell of 
;he new Retreat House is practically 
inished. No time is being wasted, for 
;he laying of the corner stone has 
)een fixed for May 15th. Bishop 
VtcGucken will be here for that red- 
etter-day in the history of the de- 
/elopment of the Mater Dolorosa Re- 
Teat League. 

Palm Sunday the organization in 
:harge of the "Fiesta" had their "kick 
)ff" meeting at the Monastery. 
\mong the 380 committee chiefs who 
ittended there was a great deal of 
nfectious enthusiasm to make this 
/ear's "Fiesta" the biggest yet. 

Father Damian's name seems to be 
the drawing card for the continued 
popularity of the monthly recollection 
lays for the clergy. There was some 
;alk of cancelling the April recollec- 
;ion day, but Bishop Manning argued 
;hat the priests could not afford to 
iniss the inspiration they have been 
:arrying away from their retreat- 
naster's talks. So the April date was 
advanced to Tuesday of Holy Week, 
md the turn-out was up to par, due 
argcly to the Bishop's words. 

Father Aiden came home from the 



ST. PAUL'S RETREAT 

(Detroit) 

Very Rev. Father Gorman, C.P., 
Provincial of the Holy Cross Province 
paid the community in Detroit an un- 
expected visit on March 8th. On the 
following day he was joined by Very 
Rev. Father James Patrick, C.P., and 
the Superior General of the Josephite 
Fathers, Very Rev. Thomas McNa- 
mara, S.S.J. 

Those connected with the Retreat 
Movement here are cheered by the 
response on the part of the men in 
the various parishes of the Arch- 
diocese. To date a total of 486 men 
have made a Retreat. Twenty-two 
Retreats have been conducted since 
last September. Several weeks ago 
the Dean of Men at the University of 
Detroit called to make arrangements 
for some of the students attending the 
University to make a Retreat. In 
fact, quite a number of younger men 
have made Retreats. On April 1st, 
24 young men of the C.Y.O. of River 
Rouge, Michigan were in attendance. 

What might be called the 'battle of 
the pots and pans' took place here 
when several men to whom Brother 
Aloysius had given the job of re- 
furnishing his aluminum pots and 
pans tried to collect a larger sum 
than what Brother bargained for. For 
a day and a half the words flew back 
and forth between the participants. 
Finally Father Rector affected a com- 



301 



r * 
« » 



» » 



M ft 



■ * 



, " 



I 



■I I 



: 



I, 



F 



'a 




I 



Retreatants at St. Paul's Monastery, Detroit, Michigan, led in the say- 
ing of the Stations by Rev. Fr. Declan, Retreat Director. 



promise. And so Brother Aloysius 
las retained possession of his alumi- 

lum ware. 
Father Mark, C.P., is moving into 

he final stages of preparation for the 
forthcoming celebration of his Silver 
Jubilee, which is going to be held at 
Loretto, Ky., on June 16th. And 
judging from the reports a large 

umber of 'kin*$lk' in Jefferson and 
Davis Counties in Kentucky will be 
on hand to make the day a joyous one, 
well as a goodly number of the 
Sisters of Loretto. Father Mathias, 
C.P., will preach the Jubilee Sermon. 



Father Benet, C.P., arrived in De- 
troit on Ash Wednesday — could there 
be a symbolic significance here? — to 
take up his duties as Vicar in Detroit. 
By now he is well on his way towards 
the complete mastery of the 'books'. 
Father Wilfrid, C.P., the former Vicar 
who is now stationed in Des Moines 
was given a rousing send-off both by 
the Brethren and the many lay-people 
who got to know him during his long 
term as Vicar. Since his departure 
we have heard from him and he in- 
forms us that he is very happy in 
Des Moines. 



The new Retreat House, at Mater Dolorosa Retreat, Sierra Madre, 
California, begins to take shape, in this latest photo of the construction 
work. 



:\o:\ 



OUR PARISHES 



IMMACULATE 
CONCEPTION 

(Chicago) 

A mere scaning of the Parish Bulle- 
tin shows us the zeal and activity of 
Fr. Richard, the Pastor. In February 
the annual collection for our Pre- 
paratory Seminary in St. Louis netted 
a nice sum. The pre-lenten indoor 
Carnival also showed hearty coopera- 
tion. The Lenten sermons, this year 
were given by Father Barnabas; 
judging from the attendance much 
good was done. On March 13th Fr. 
Alban conducted a Day of Recollec- 
tion for the men of the parish. The 
all-night adoration from Maundy 
Thursday to Good Friday also be- 
speaks the spiritual well-being of the 
parish. 

The RCA VICTOR CO. graciously 
loaned the parish a television set to 
follow the consecration of the three 
Bishops in Chicago, March 7th. 
School was called off for the occasion 
and all the parishioners invited to 
view the ceremony in picture. 

April 24th the parish extended a 
formal farewell to Fr. Donald, who 
for the several past years had been 
first Assistant at Immaculate Concep- 
tion. This change was made on ac- 
count of the recent accident Fr. 
Donald suffered. Fr. Quentin suc- 
ceeded him April 29th. 



ST. GEMMA 

(Detroit) 

Our parish was highly honored to 
have Fr. Roland preach a two weeks 
mission from March f>th to 20th. As 
the parish is small we decided that a 



two weeks mission would suffice. The 
first week was for women and High 
School girls, and the second week for 
men and High School boys. Our 
children were not forgotten, as they 
had their mission during the first 
week in the afternoon. Most of the 
youngsters go to the public school 
nearby, and we scheduled their mis- 
sion for 4 P.M. 

The parish in general corresponded 
with the "grace; of the mission, and 
the people were faithful to the morn- 
ing and evening services. All were in 
admiration at Fr. Roland's ability as 
preacher and missionary. The pa- 
rishioners have the greatest respect 
for the Passionist Congregation since 
the mission. Generous and sincere 
praise was given in comments about 
the manner of conducting our mis- 
sions. The large crucifix made a deep 
impression upon the parishoners. This 
was the first mission for some of the 
people, while others were accustomed 
to sermons preached from the pulpit. 
God's grace was evident throughout 
the two weeks, and Father's generous 
sacrifice of time and self made a last- 
ing impression upon his hearers. As 
dear old Fr. Simon used to recount 
the success of his mission by the ex- 
pression, "Caught some BIG FISH", 
so too this mission brought back some 
very Big Fish. Though the mission 
accomplished much spiritual good for 
the people of the parish, many re- 
fused to accept the grace, and this in 
spite of the fact that the mission was 
publicized properly and every family 
in the parish received a letter urging 
attendance. 



304 



Two outstanding events of Holy 
Week might be mentioned, namely the 
Procession and Adoration on Holy 
Thursday. Two members of the Altar 
Society volunteered to train the chil- 
dren for the procession. This de- 
manded much patience, but the good 
ladies did a fine job, as results proved. 
The youngsters received much praise 
from their mothers and other mem- 
bers of the congregation who were 
present at the services. The Com- 
munity was present, and the Fathers 
also commented very favorably. All 
admit that there is a need for Sisters 
to train the children, for it seems 
they have a special technique with 
children. 

During the day the Altar Boys and 
members of the Altar Society kept 
vigil before the Repository. Noc- 
turnal adoration was kept by the men 
of the Holy Name Society and the 
Men's Club. The vigil during the 
night seemed to be something unheard 
of, when mentioned to the men. 'Twas 
edifying to see our parishioners faith- 
ful to their hour of adoration, and 
most edifying to see the men come 
during the night to spend an hour in 
presence of the Blessed Sacrament. 
The full liturgical ceremonies for a 
parish were conducted during the 
three days of Holy Week. Fr. Alexi- 
us preached the Tre Ore to an over- 
crowded chapel. 



A very important item of interest 
is the fact that the parish has per- 
mission to build an eight grade school. 
The people have been hoping for a 



parish hall where meetings and social 
activities could be conducted in com- 
fort. Preliminary plans for a hall 
were submitted to the Archdiocesan 
Building Commission and approved. 
But the Pastor was convinced by 
Bishop Woznicki, head of the Build- 
ing Commission, that a school should 
be erected. The Bishop pointed out 
that we have the chapel for Mass and 
religious services and two houses for 
a Sisters' convent. Fr. Patrick has 
a verbal promise from Mother Gerald 
to send Sisters to teach. The con- 
clusion was that we should not waste 
time with a parish-hall, when a school 
would be more practical. Our archi- 
tect is completing plans for a one 
storey school for nine grades (Kinder- 
garten, a special feature), with four 
rooms unfinished. These will be used 
as a parish hall, a space 40 ft. wide 
and 70 ft. long. The estimated cost 
for a one storey building is about 
$130,000; the Bishop agreed that the 
parish could borrow up to $150,000. 
The blue prints and specifications will 
be finished in the very near future and 
we are looking forward to breaking 
ground soon. It is realized that the 
parish will have to carry a large debt, 
and that many families will be over- 
burdened. Two hundred families 
comprise the parish, of which one 
hundred and forty are active Catho- 
lics. But the good parishioners are 
overjoyed at the prospect of a school, 
even though they realize that they 
will have to do their share to make 
up the deficit, since the indifferent will 
probably not donate a penny. The 
Brethren might keep this project in 
their prayers that God will bless us 
with success. 



305 




HOLY FAMILY 

(Ensley) 

Since the last notice we have been 
able to give of our Colored Parish 
much water has flown under the 
bridge and also into the C.P. property 
in Ensley. Two back floods worked 
havoc. The first took place November 
28th, the second January 4th. The 
first of these caused more damage 
than the second since it came un- 
expectedly. The pictures give some 
idea of the amount of water on the 
property. When the water began to 
subside a bit, the job of pumping 
water out of three basements began. 
It is estimated that from 50,000 to 
100,000 gallons of water were pumped 
out. It was a novel sight to see a 
maternity case brought to the hospital 
in a motor boat. They came down 
19th street straight to the steps of the 
hospital. On January 4th the night 
nurses could not leave the hospital 
till noon when a horse and wagon 
came ; the nurses were carried out and 
then driven away. One of the Sisters 
had to have a look at the flooded 
school-basement, slipped, went head- 
long down the steps and almost 
drowned. One of the High School 

306 



Three 
flood! 



of the Fathers against a 
Not much could be donej 




Rising water filled basements. 
Above, Rectory and Grade School. 
Below, "Appeal" Office. 




Converts, who hadn't missed Mass 
ince his Baptism, phoned to say he 
ust couldn't make it. Some of the 
arishioners had from an inch to three 
eet of water in their homes; the 
lamage can be imagined. Life is bad 
nough at best "down there" and we 
ope discouragement will not set in 
>n account of this great disaster. 



Another hard row is the hospital 
Irive. So far only $85,000 has been 
raised out of the needed $285,000. 
The Fathers are getting little, if any, 
cooperation from members of the 
faith; the best helper is a certain Mr. 
Z. Newman, Sports Editor of the 
Birmingham News, a non-Catholic. 
The Government has given its ap- 
proval and the architect says he 
hould have the drawings completed 
in six weeks. It will take about a 
month to get the bids. The plans are 
to start with a 60 bed hospital and 
later increase to a 200 one. At 
present there are only 531 beds in a 
county in which there are over 250,000 
Colored living. 



Dramatics in Holy Family High 
showed its talents in minstrel to a 
packed house shortly before Christ- 
mas. Before Lent "Here Comes 
Charlie" was given on two successive 
nights to appreciative audiences. A 
Senior of the school, Virga Brown, 
won the Scholarship in the Oratorical 
Contest held for Jefferson County; 
another member of the school, Dorothy 
Jean Palmer has been accepted for a 
coming contest. Through contribu- 
tions from the High School Students 
it was possible to have a colored Fa- 
ther from Bay St. Louis Seminary 



conduct a Vocation week. 

In the church rubber kneelers were 
installed to the satisfaction of all. 
Speaking of church attendance, so 
many of the school children attend 
DAILY Mass that it was found neces- 
sary to exclude the Kindergarten and 
first Grade pupils. 

Part of the Lenten Services was the 
showing of slides on the Life of 
Christ. During Lent, in Passion-tide, 
the Forty Hours Devotion was held; 
an exceptional number of persons re- 
ceived the Sacraments during those 
days. 

A big day for the parish was March 
22nd when Bishop Toolen confirmed a 
class of 131; some children were not 
able to be present on account of 
measles; 5, hindered on account of 
work, were confirmed in St. Mary's 
Fairfield. Very Reverend Father 
Joseph, Provincial Consultor, also 
graced the occasion with his genial 
presence. Before the services the 28 
attending clergymen were served to a 
fine dinner. 

To assist the social life of the 
parish, zealous Fr. Eustace initiated a 
monthly "Fun Night" for adults. 
Songs, games and refreshments help 
to dispel for a few bright moments 
the hard and cold things of life. 



SAINT MARY 

[Fairfield) 

March 20th, although it must have 
been a most busy day, must also have 
been one of great consolation and 
satisfaction for Fr. Edmund. On that 
day Bishop Toolen solemnly blessed 
the new school at St. Mary's and also 
confirmed (the first time in the 
parish) a class of 40, adults and chil- 



307 






TWO FLOODS, the first on Nov. 28, 1948, the second Jan. 4, 1949 struck a hard; 
blow at our Ensley Colored Mission in Alabama, causing much loss and damage. 
Above, the Church and Parish House, below, the Holy Family Hospital and High 
School, all in water above the foundations. 



i 




•4PJ 




March 20, 1949, at St. Mary's Negro Parish, Fairfield, Alabama. Most 
Rev. Bishop Toolen, of Mobile, Alabama, presides over a two-fold 
ceremony: Confirmation and the Dedication of the New School. 



dren. Although St. Mary's started as 
late as 1943, with one Catholic pa- 
rishioner, it now has a Church, Sis- 
ters' Residence, Rectory, a School and 
about one hundred Catholics. The 
school is a modern brick building. It 
serves the first four grades, 180 chil- 
dren. The second floor of the build- 
ing is not completed, but will be as 
the need requires. The building of 
this school caused Fr. Edmund many 
a worry and disappointment. His 
first idea was to have it ready for oc- 
cupancy for last September. If our 
congratulations upon the work done 
help to add to his joy now that it is 
near completion, we heartily offer it. 
That the school was of diocesan in- 
terest is shown by the fact that the 
diocesan weekly, "The Catholic Week" 



gave it a writeup and picture on the 
front page. 

HOLY GHOST PROVINCE 

(Australia) 

During the last week of February 
and the whole month of March the 
Province was blessed with the 
presence of Most Reverend Father 
General. During that time His Pa- 
ternity held the Canonical Visitation 
in each of the five Retreats. During 
the last week he presided at the Pro- 
vincial Chapter. The results of the 
elections are as follows: Fr. Pro- 
vincial, Fr. Alphonsus, (reelected) ; 
First Consultor, Fr. Aloysius; Second 
Consultor, Fr. Raymund; Master of 
Novices, Fr. Leo; Rectors: Marrick- 
ville, Fr. Paschal; Goulburn, Fr. 



309 



John; Adelaide, Fr. Wilfrid; Geelong, 
Fr. Xavier, (Reelected) ; St. Ives, Fr. 
Placid. Father General left Australia 
for Rome, via air, on April 4th. 



MOTHER OF HOLY HOPE 
PROVINCE 

(Holland) 

April 20th marks the Silver Jubilee 
of the Establishing of the Province of 
Our Lady of Holy Hope. We are sure 
it was celebrated with due solemnity. 
The growth of the Province in the 
past 25 years is as follows: in 1924 
there were 31 Fathers, in 1949, 95, 
Professed Students 13 and 29; Broth- 
ers 10 and 36; Preparatory Semi- 
narians 26 and 137; Monasteries 2 
and 4. The Province now edits two 
magazines; Golgatha has 29,000 sub- 
scribers and Gemmabode has 34,000. 
Our felicitations to all the members of 
the Province on its jubilee and God's 
blessing on the Provincial Chapter, to 
be held under the Presidency of Very 
Reverend Fr. Vincent, General Con- 
suitor. This is the 8th Provincial 
Chapter and opens April 20th. 



FIVE WOUNDS V-PROVINCE 

(Germany-Austria) 

February 26th was a day of great 
joy for the Munich-Pasing Communi- 
ty. On that day after nine years in 
Army service or in Russian captivity, 
Fr. Dominic took up residence again 
in a monastery. Since his return 
from Russian hands some months ago, 
fantastic as it may sound, Father has 
gained 50 pounds in weight. He is 
able to attend part of the observance, 
says Holy Mass daily and even 
preaches on Sundays. His classmate, 



Father Joseph, is still in Siberia. 

During February and March Fathe 
Provincial conducted both the annua 
visitation and the retreat in the tw« 
Monasteries in German territory 
Very Reverend Father Malcolm is ex 
pected in May to conduct the chapte) 
in which the election of the Superior. 1 
of the Vice-Province is to take place 

Lately an army Chaplain for the 
98th General Hospital was appointed 
thus relieving the Fathers in th( 
Munich-Pasing Monastery of that re 
sponsibility. In January, Fathers 
Ambrose and Columba who had beeri 
administering in the 98th Genera) 
Hospital conducted days of recollec 
tion for the American Chaplains in 
the Munich area. 

The recent illness of Father Recto 
and Brother Emil of the Schwarzen 
feld Community added many burdens 
to the rest of the small Community 
Fr. Roland, recently appointed Vicar 
suddenly found himself in charge of 
the Community, a charge that lasted 
for two months. On Sundays Frs 
Roland and Edward celebrate Holy 
Mass, hear Confessions and preach fori! 
the American soldiers in nearby 
camps. 

Great quantities of clothing con- 
tinue to arrive at our Monasteries in 
Pasing and Schwarzenfeld. With so 
many people flocking to either Mon- 
astery to share this clothing there was 
not a moment's peace. Now the 
clothing is given to local Sisters and 
Priests for distribution. 

The Fathers in Germany wish here- 
by to express their sincere gratitude 
ot the many Brethren of both Ameri- 
can Provinces for their charity; es- 
pecially to Father Provincial of the 



310 



Eastern Province, who continues to 
end CARE packages each month to 
he three Monasteries of the German 
/ice-Province. Nor can we forget the 
eal and charity of Fr. Leopold 
Snyder. Through Father's efforts 
veekly packages of food and clothing 
irrive at each of our Monasteries. 
Prayers are asked for the strug- 
ling Vice-Province. 

POLAND 

We were very glad to hear from 
jur Brethren in Poland for very evi- 
ient reasons. The letter was written 
March 25th. 

Our church in Przasysz formerly 
was in the hands of the Franciscans 
and under their tutelage. The Feast 
of the Immaculate Conception was 
celebrated annually with an Octave of 
Services. Our Fathers kept this de- 
votion and in the past year the crowds 
were so great that the large church 
could not hold all of them; a loud- 
speaking system was installed so that 
those standing outside of the church 
could hear the sermon and follow the 
services. This was necessary every 
evening of the Octave. 

Fr. Michael, Provincial Consultor 
and Master of Novices, who wrote our 
letter, tells us that the past winter 
was exceptionally mild and thus the 
repairs on the Retreats was not held 
up too much, repairs on damages made 
during the war. These consisted in 
repairing floors, doors, water lines; 
and getting electricity into the Church 
and Retreat. This spring they hope 
to get at the roofs to keep out the 
rain. 

Also literary endeavors are made in 
the Vice-Province; among others at 




The church at Przasnysz 

present they are sponsoring the trans- 
lation of Fr. Nicholas' "Suffering 
with Jesus". The Polish translation 
is expected to be for sale this year. 



PASSIONIST NUNS 
OUR LADY OF SORROWS 

(Pittsburgh) 

May 26th, Ascension Day, Consorel- 
la Mary Gabriel made her perpetual 

The crosses upon the hill of Sadorie 




Profession, so that now we have an- 
other Mother praying and suffering 
for us and for the betterment of the 
world at large. May God bless her 
abundantly and, through her, the Con- 
gregation. 

ST. GABRIEL'S 

{Scranton) 

Great was the joy of Sister Mary 
Joseph lately when her persevering 
prayer of over 30 years was finally 
answered. Sister lost her parents at 
an early age. She and her brothers 
and sisters were separated and placed 
in different orphanages or with pri- 
vate families. Contact with two of 
her brothers had been lost entirely. 
Recently one of these two brothers, 
Marion, put a notice in the papers 
seeking information as to the where- 
abouts of his immediate family. 
Through the courtesy of the Servants 
of the Immaculate Heart of Mary this 
notice was brought to the attention of 
Mother Catharine, Superioress in St. 
Gabriel's. After a bit of investiga- 
tion it was found that the brother of 
Sister Mary Joseph, Marion, lived a 
few minutes walk from the convent! 



Father Theophane McGuire, . C.P., 
brought great pleasure and much en- 
thusiasm for the missions in China to 
the Mothers and Sisters by his visit 
to them April 2nd. 



ST. JOSEPH'S 

{Owenaboro) 

The annual retreat, conducted by 
Fr. Mark during the Octave of the 
Solemn Commemoration of the Pas- 
sion, ushered in the Season of Lent for 
our Nuns. During Lent, by arrange- 



ment of Most Reverend Bishop Cot-I 
ton, the Nuns also were privileged to 
have a regular Lenten course of ser- 
mons, given by members of the Dio-| 
cesan Clergy. "These", the sermons, 
"were very instructive, but what im- 
pressed us most was the deep interior 
spirit of the priests themselves, that 
their words manifested. It was a< 
stimulus to us who haven't the dis-i 
tractions and activity they have tol 
contend with." The Nuns also receive 
a weekly instruction in Christian Doc- 
trine from their regular Confessor. 

Together with the rest of the 
Catholic World the Nuns spent Pas- 
sion Sunday in adoration before the 
Solemnly exposed Blessed Sacrament, 
imploring God to have mercy on a 
world that has forgotten Him and is 
persecuting His Church. Every hour, 
on the hour, the "Adoremus" was 
chanted and the Litany of the Holy 
Name recited in the little St. Joseph 
Choir. 

Holy Week for the Nuns, as for all 
of us, is the week of the year, but for 
them, it seems to us, it takes a special 
character of sacrifice, since they are 
deprived of the grand ceremonies on 
Good Friday and Holy Saturday. 

On April 29th St. Joseph's spon- 
sored its first Lay Retreat of the year 
after an interruption of more than 
four months. The schedule calls for 
14 retreats during the remainder of 
the year. Father Alfred is now con- 
ducting these retreats, for the third 
consecutive year. A neat little folder, 
containing the "Grades of the Pas- 
sion" and "A Visit to the Crucifix", 
is given to the Retreatants. The 
Souvenirs were printed and donated 
by Miss Coats, Louisville. 



312 



The Community of St. Joseph's 
iow has nine members, the nine choirs 
?f Angels; of these two are Postulants 
and one is a Novice. 



SACRED PASSION 

(Erlcvnger) 

The members of the Sacred Passion 
Convent, with much trust in the Lord, 
are looking foroward to the time when 
hey will be able to live in a convent 

ore suitable to their vocation. The 
hew site for the same has been de- 
finitely chosen; they are now waiting 
for the completion of the plans and, 
with a bit of apprehension, for the 
estimate. We are confident that 
through their prayers, and ours, they 
will succeed. 

The nuns in Marydale have two 
very promising Novices. 



IMMACULATE 
CONCEPTION 

(Kirkwood) 

If a sister or postulant cannot be 
found within the convent these days 
we have only to look in the garden. 
One of our benefactors had the north 
side of our garden plowed for us and 
every spare minute is spent there 
setting out plants and sowing the 
seeds for a vegetable garden. 

The space around our grotto is very 
beautiful at this season with flowers 
of varied colors in full bloom. 

The first Lent since the establish- 
ment of our canonical enclosure was 
a most peaceful one and was brought 
to a devotional close by the carrying 
out of our usual Holy Week observ- 
ances to which we gave as much 
solemnity as is possible in as small a 



community as ours. The risen 
Saviour seemed to share with us the 
joys of His resurrection not only 
during Easter and its octave but also 
the following week when the Feast 
of the Mother of Good Counsel gave 
us the happiness of bestowing the 
holy habit on our first postulant, Miss 
Margaret Franz of Pittsburgh, Pa., 
who received the name, Consorella 
Mary of Jesus. 

Before leaving on a visit to the 
Eternal City our most reverend arch- 
bishop had designated Very Rev. Fa- 
ther Kyran, C.P., to officiate at the 
vestition. Very Rev. Father was ac- 
companied by Rev. Fathers Elmer, 
James and Cronan, which made the 
occasion a truly family affair, for only 
a few lay persons were in attendance 
due to the inclemency of the weather 
and to the little publicity we had 
given the event because our chapel is 
so very small. Very Rev. Father 
Rector was assisted by Rev. Elmer in 
the performance of the ceremony and 
also gave Benediction of the most 
Blessed Sacrament. The beauty of the 
simple but impressive ceremony was 
greatly enhanced by the kindness of 
the four priests who sang for bene- 
diction and chanted the prescribed 
psalms. Never did Psalm 21, so 
graphically descriptive of our Sav- 
iour's Passion, seem so inspiring as 
on this ooccasion and we feel we can- 
not adequately express our gratitude 
to our big brothers for the most beau- 
tiful vestition ceremony we have ever 
been privileged to witness. Rev. Fa- 
ther Elmer gave a very eloquent ser- 
mon on the significance of the cere- 
mony and set forth to the new novice 
the goal she must strive to obtain a 



318 



daily dying with Christ in order to 
live with Him. 

We ask the prayers of our brethren 
for Consorella Mary and ourselves 
that the spiritual life of each may 



grow into an ever deeper abiding ir 
our Crucified Spouse and that we re- 
main faithful to our station at thd 
foot of His holy cross with our dean 
Sorrowful Mother. 



PASSIONIST SISTERS 



Ceremonies of profession and recep- 
tion took place at Mount St. Joseph's, 
Novitiate of the Passionist Sisters, 
Bristol, on Saturday, April 2nd. Two 
Novices were professed and five 
Postulants received the Holy Habit. 

Novices professed were Sister M. 
Augustine (Mageau) of Charlestown, 
R. I. and Sister M. Berchmans 
(Dripps) of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Postulants receiving the Holy Habit 
were: Sister Immaculata (Margaret 
Mary Hanley) of Providence; Sister 
Christine (Regina Gomes) of East 
Providence; Sister Margaret Mary 
(Rita Laffey) of Peacedale; Sister 
Elisabeth (Catharine Gagne) of 
Kingston; Sister Joachim (Margaret 
Doucette) of Waltham, Mass. 

Reverend William Kelly, Superior 
of St. Columban Seminary, Bristol, 
officiated, being assisted by Reverend 
Patrick Lavin also of the Columban 
Seminary. Reverend Father Canice, 
C.P., delivered a fitting sermon for the 
occasion and also read the Passion. 

Benediction of the Blessed Sacra- 
ment concluded the ceremonies. Fa- 
ther Kelly officiated assisted by Very 
Reverend Father Berchmans, C.P. and 
Reverend John V. Doyle of the As- 
sumption parish, Providence. Among 
those present were Very Reverend 
Father Gordian, C.P., Father Gerard, 
C.P., Father Leo, C.P., Reverend Wil- 



liam Gilloly, Reverend Paul Conneely 
and Reverend Gerard Smith. 



The Passionist Sisters at the Re- 
treat House of the Immaculate Heart j 
of Mary, Peacedale, R.I., werd 
honored with a visit from Mrs. Mary] 
L. Wilhere, Philadelphia, Pa., presi- 
dent of the National Lay Women's Re- 
treat Movement. She was accom- 
panied by Miss Rose R. Pound 1 
Organizer of the Retreat House irl 
Elkins Park, Pa., and Miss Regina 
Kirkpatrick, the National Publicity 
Chairman for the Women's Retreat 
Movement. 



The Passionist Sisters held theiil 
initial 1949 week-end retreat from 
February 11-13, in honor of our Lady 
of Lourdes. The retreatants present 
under the leadership of Miss Mary C. 
Collins, Westerly, will be known aa 
the Immaculate Heart of Mary Guild] 
and are planning to return for an- 
other retreat, May 20-22. 

Thirty-two ladies were present foi 
a Day of Recollection on March 27th 
which was conducted by Reverenc, 
Clement Buckley, C.P. 

On April 10th, Reverend William A 
Hinnebusch, O.P., conducted a Day oi 
Recollection for 45 Catholic College 
Alumnae. 

The following is a list of spiritual 



314 



ixercises that were or will be held at 
he Retreat House: April 24, (Day 
if Recollection), General. April 29- 
Hay 1 (Week-end Retreat) Young 
^adies' Sodality. May 1 (Day of 
Recollection), General. May 2 (Day 
>f Recollection) Young Business 
Women. May 6-8 (Week-end Retreat) 
College Students. May 13-15 (Week- 



end Retreat) Girl Scouts. May 20-22 
(Week-end Retreat) Immaculate 
Heart of Mary Guild. May 27-29 
(Week-end Retreat) High School 
Girls. June 10-12 (Week-end Retreat) 
Holyoke Group. June 19 (Day of 
Recollection) Rosary and Altar So- 
ciety. June 26 (Day of Recollection) 
General. 



SPES NOSTRA 

No day is ended till its sun hath set, 

Nor life completed till death's sombre gloom 
Steals o'er its twilight, and the yawning tomb 

Engulfs its sin and sorrow, toil and fret. 

Who most has cause to mourn with vain regret 

A guilty past, and dread eternal doom, 

May, if he will, his future course illume 
And reap the Saint's rich, golden harvest yet. 

For she, the Mother Blest whom Jesus gave, 

All-potent Advocate at Mercy's throne, 
Lends willing ear when contrite sinners crave 

The sweet compassion she has ever shown 
To bruised reeds. Ah, who would not be brave 

When Heaven's Queen doth make his cause her own? 

Arthur Barry O'Neill, C.S.C. 



315 




ana 



THE INVASION 

Solitude is one of the features of 
the Passionist form of religious life. 
This is evident, not only from the 
Rules and practice of the Congrega- 
tion, but also from the insistence of 
our Holy Founder. St. Paul of the 
Cross wished the houses to be built in 
retired places, "so that the devout 
brethren . . . may withdraw far from 
the society of men and the noise of 
the world, to devote themselves in 
solitude to their own spiritual ad- 
vancement, to prayers, fastings, and 
other pious exercises, by which they 
may be more and more inflamed with 
divine love." (Reg. n. 10). Living in 
solitude was one of the means by 
which the religious would be able to 
increase in virtue and made more 
ready to preach the Word of God and 
promote devotion to the Blessed Pas- 
sion of Jesus among the faithful. 

This essential Passionist spirit is in 
danger of being lost by the trespass- 
ing of seculars on our grounds. It 
has reached such a degree that it can 
be rightly called an invasion. Every 
day it seems to grow larger and more 
troublesome to the religious. Seculars 
who use our property as a public park 
or playground are not only a nuisance, 
but they also cause considerable 
damage to monastic property. Trees, 

316 




shrubs, flowers, and even shrines ar< 
constantly in danger of being 
damaged and even ruined. Garbage 
has deliberately been dumped then 
and old Christmas trees have beer 
thrown on the lawn; and this in i 
place where there is a regular collec- 
tion of garbage. 

Something ought to be done about! 
this invasion of our solitude anc 
privacy. If not, the abuse will become! 
greater and more entrenched. Ii 
strong measures are not taken im- 
mediately to stop the abuse, it will bd 
difficult, if not impossible, to do so 
when seculars, especially boys, wil! 
consider they have a quasi-prescrip-: 
tive right to the use of the monastic 
property as a public playground. The 
time to stop this abuse and nuisance 
is not some time in the indefinite! 
future, but now. 

Solitude and privacy are needed foi 
the spiritual welfare of all our religi- 
ous. They are as necessary for a 
Passionist with the spirit of St. Paul 
of the Cross, as water is for fishJ 
Imagine what would happen to the 
spirit and the reality of solitude, ii 
boys and other seculars, both men and 
women, are allowed to use our 
grounds at their pleasure. There will 
be noise during rest and after night 
prayers, when religious are trying tcr 



eep, so that "with senses ready and 
ee, they may rise in the night to 
ng praises to God." 

There will be more damage to 
•operty than has happened up to this 
me. The burning of dry grass and 
e breaking of trees and shrubs has 
»en committed already. What will 
ippen if nothing is done to keep 
culars off the grounds and they be- 
n to assume a sort of right to the 
e of it? Boys love to start fires, 
f course, the indulgent among us will 
y they don't mean any harm. In- 
ied! Perhaps they don't intend to 
irn down a barn or chicken-coop, but 
can happen despite their lack of 
id intention. 

One day a group of girls ranging 
om 6 to 10 years of age were climb- 
g a cherry tree on the grounds. One 
! the girls managed to break the 
rgest limb of the tree. When she 
as chased from the grounds she and 
e others ran with a show of guilt. 
ut boys are not conscience-stricken 
<e the girls. One boy with a foot- 
,11 helmet was butting his way 
rough a hedge, and another was 
imping and falling on top of it. It 
as great fun while it lasted, but 
ey didn't stop from any sense of 
rong-doing. One wonders where this 
ause will end — in burning down the 
onastery, or in killing one of its 
mates? In the January 1949 issue 
' The Passionist we read that a .22 
allet pierced a window and struck 
wall in the Sacred Heart Monastery 
Louisville. It was presumably 
•ed by a boy engaged in target prac- 
ce on the bottoms; no doubt as 
ough he had a perfect right to be 



there. Luckily, no religious was hit. 

Some, though not all, religious 
realize that the problem is a serious 
one and that it will not be stopped 
except with great difficulty. Though 
it must be confessed that a few re- 
ligious are indifferent, if not agree- 
able to the invasion, many religious 
very much desire to put a stop to it 
but complain that it is impossible of 
solution. In the writer's view this 
opinion is debatable. Certainly we 
wont know whether or not it is in- 
soluble, until strong and united 
measures are tried. It is imperative 
that the matter be taken care of now. 
For if nothing is done and the con- 
dition is allowed to continue boys will 
consider that our inaction is a tacit 
consent to their trespassing and its 
harmful effects. Furthermore, the 
nuisance will inevitably grow stronger 
and create a quasi-prescriptive right 
to invade. When a forceful and de- 
termined superior decides to do some- 
thing positive to stop the invasion, he 
will find it the more difficult on ac- 
count of the custom. 

Formerly, at least here, there was 
hardly ever an invasion of the monas- 
tery grounds, and when it began in 
considerable numbers the kids were 
easily chased out, because they showed 
that they realized they were tres- 
passing. But now they don't show 
any sense of guilt. In fact they will 
stand their ground and refuse to 
leave; and even defend their trespass- 
ing. If they are chased out one gate, 
they return by another. It is evident 
how the condition is aggravated by 
toleration. What will it be in five or 
ten years, when there will still be 
boys. What will become of the soli- 



317 



tude and privacy which are so es- 
sential to our religious life? 

What ought to be done? What can 
be done? 

Boys — for they are the principal 
offenders — should not be allowed to 
feel that their invasion of the monas- 
tery ground is tacitly tolerated. 
Hence, there should be united action 
taken by all the religious to destroy 
this notion. All the members of the 
community should strive to keep them 
off the grounds. If some religious 
act otherwise, there will be no united 
action. The kids will say in defense, 
that Fr. A or Brother B said it was 
all right. 

Even allowing them to use a corner 
of the grounds as a concession will 
not do. There will be more boys than 
can be accommodated in the reserved 
space, and the rest will move to an- 
other reserved space. A third group 
will come — since the monastery is the 
place to play! Where will such a 
thing end? By taking over the entire 
property and chasing the religious 
out? Remember the story of the 
Arab and the camel. He took pity on 
the poor beast and allowed it to stick 
its nose under his tent; whereupon 
the poor beast, wanting more room, 
kicked the Arab out. Remember, too, 
the hole in the dike. Only a trickle 
in the beginning, and easily stopped; 
but if neglected it will bring down 
the whole dike and the countryside 
will be flooded. Do we want to lose 
all privacy? 

A lawyer ought to be consulted 
about the legal requirements against 
trespassing. He may advise that the 
property must first be posted against 
it. Signs could be nailed high up on 

318 



trees but plain to read. They should 
be fixed high so as not to be torn 
down by the invaders. This will be 
the first step in legal protection. 

Then the police should be enlisted.* 
They are appointed and paid to main-i 
tain order and to protect private 
property against abuse. We are en- 
titled to as much protection as a banW 
or a grocery, or one of the political 
clubs, against nuisance and damage. 
Why not utilize this protection? Most 
towns have radio police who spend 
their time cruising around town 
They could easily visit the monastery 
grounds when the boys are usurping 
it and order them to leave. Now, the 
police pay no attention; perhaps be- 
cause we don't seem to care ourselves 

In case of damage to trees, etc.! 
sue the boys when apprehended. This 
might entail a fine, which of course 
the parents would have to pay. Thh 
would require that the Rector should 
appear in court to press the charge 
This is a very disagreeable job, bu 
it must be done, when mildei, 
measures are not effective. A righ 
without a sanction is practically 
worthless to maintain order. 

This procedure may stir up somii 
resentment, but this can be avoidec 
by an understanding with the prin 
ciples of the schools in the neighbor) 
hood. They should be asked to inn 
press on the minds of their pupil; 
that trespassing on private property 
is wrong, and they can tell them why 
It is presumed that children in publi 
schools are still taught the "Americai 
way of life." Also announcements ii 
the pulpit and even in the local news 
paper could be made, in order to pre] 
pare the minds of the people. Thi^ 



ill give timely warning and prevent 
>position to the rights of the religi- 
is to enjoy their own property in 
;ace. 

In the writer's opinion the whole 
atter demands that a united action 
; taken everywhere, but especially 
here this invasion of our solitude 
id privacy is acute. It should be 
ade clear to boys and their parents 
at our garden are private property 
not public parks and playgrounds, 
nd all the religious should chase the 
>ys out and not give them the im- 
•ession that trespassing is all right, 
ith legal protection and help from 
e police and united action by all, 
pecially Superiors, the nuisance can 
; stopped, or at least lessened; and 
ly sense of quasi-prescriptive right 
ill be abolished. 

The objection will be made by some 
sligious, extremely sensitive to the 
lelings of the "people" and most in- 
nsitive to the peaceful enjoyment 
r our rights, that this sort of action 
1 our part will stir up bad feelings, 
ren among our own Catholics. It 
ay be a possibility, so great is the 
»cadance of morals today, but this 
sk ought to be taken. The essential 
lestion is: are we entitled to privacy 
id solitude, and do we sincerely wish 
i maintain them? If we are and if 
e want to preserve them, the risk is 
orthwhile. Otherwise, the invasion 
ill become so great and the nuisance 
) unbearable, it will be necessary to 
ove to othe" parts, where the soli- 
ide is real and privacy easy to main- 
lin. It will be another instance of 
le camel getting his nose under the 
jnt and kicking the occupant out. 



As matters stand now, I wonder 
whether those religious who live in 
the midst of things in large cities, 
with little property attached to their 
houses, are not more free of the 
nuisance of playful boys than we are, 
with our many acres of ground, which 
are meant to insure solitude and 
privacy. Still, the case is not hope- 
less. With united action and vigor to 
prosecute it, it is capable of being sub- 
stantially bettered, if not completely 
solved. Its solution depends on us. 
Amator Solitudinis. 



Father Alfred MacConastair, C.P. 
(Sierra Madre) has written a very 
attractive life of Bl. Mary Goretti 
and we have all reasons to believe 
that it will soon be available in print. 
It is written most interestingly and 
has quite an abundance of appealing 
applications, especially for young- 
sters. Speaking of Bl. Mary Goretti 
our Fathers in Brazil sponsored a 
grand celebration in her honor. 
Unique was the large painting of Bl. 
Mary attired in quite modern dress. 



A translation of all the Masses 
proper to our Congregation into 
English is now in the printer's hands. 
Confrater Paul Mary, C.P. sponsored 
this work; the printing is being done 
by St. Meinrad Abbey Press, St. 
Meinrad, Indiana. 



"The Passionist Vocation", pub- 
lished by the Province of St. Paul of 
the Cross, is a pamphlet describing 
our life from the days at the Pre- 
paratory Seminary to the years of the 
Priesthood. The last chapter, entitled 



'Have I a vocation' 



gives some 
319 



sound counsel as to how to recognize 
a vocation. The last part of the 
pamphlet is made up of some fine pic- 
torial views of Holy Cross Minor 
Seminary, Dunkirk. The frontispiece 
is a reproduction of an original pen- 
drawing of St. Gabriel. 



"Your Yuanling Catholic Hospital" 
is the title of a pamphlet commemo- 
rating the completion and blessing of 
the Passionist Hospital in our China 
Mission. On April 28th 1948, His 
Excellency, The Most Reverend Cuth- 
bert M. O'Gara, C.P., D.D., blessed 
the latest addition to the hospital, the 
best building of all, a four story brick 
structure that overlooks the city of 
Yuanling. The pamphlet gives a his- 
tory of the hospital, with interesting 
statistics. That a hospital is es- 
sential, also supernaturally in a 
Catholic Mission is very logically 
stressed. Father Caspar Caufield, 
C.P., who planned and supervised the 
building is now in this country. He is 
booked to return to China on May 
18th. Although the China situation, 
as far as the C.P. Mission is con- 
cerned has lately become a big 
question mark, still Bishop O'Gara is 
going ahead as usual, hoping for in- 
definite freedom of action. 



Father Raphael, C.P., our great 
Fatima Devotion promotor, besides 
his booklet on the subject has also set 
up "The Fatima Prayers" in mimeo- 
graph form together with "The Steps 
of the Sacred Passion". This is used 
during Benediction of the Blessed 
Sacrament during the Lay Retreats 
at Holy Cross Retreat House, Cincin- 
nati. 



Our Father Provincial has procuredl 
a sufficient number of Martyrologiesi 
to supply all the Retreats of the Pro- 
vince. These Martyrologies are the* 
latest edition (1948) and contain all 
the newly canonized Saints; the use 
of this Martyrology will simplify mat- 
ters in the Ordo, since it will noi 
longer be necessary to indicate so 
many "Inserenda". 



The Pictorial Magazine Section of 
"The Cincinnati Enquirer" on Sunn 
day, April 29, 1949 presented a 
colored photo of Holy Cross Church 
(interior), Mt. Adams, Cincinnati, as 
its frontispiece. 



CORRECTION: On page 563 ofl 
Vol. I of THE PASSIONIST, the( 
legend under the picture should be: 
"Two Dutch Passionists in the 
Belgian Congo" and not "In New- 
Guinea". 



A few years ago some of us in the 
"West" saw an advertisement of ec- 
clesiastical vestment goods having the 
design of our Sign. It might be of 
interest to know some of its history 
and also that it is still available. It 
was designed upon the request of 
Bishop Cuthbert, C.P., by Fr. Judei 
C.P. (West Springfield). The first set} 
(five colors, gothic) was presented by 
the Bishop to V. Rev. Fr. Provincial 
Union City, who uses it for his daily 
Mass. The Bishop in China also ha^ 
a complete set for his Cathedral. Now| 
nearly every Retreat in the Province 
of St. Paul of the Cross uses vest-i 
ment made with this material foi( 
Feast Days etc. The Passionist Nuns| 
in Scranton have made practically al 



320 



lese vestments. The pattern repre- 
ents our "Sign" in an idealized shield 
ormed from the branches of the 
live and palm. The passion-flower is 
pread throughout as a motif. It was 
'oven by the Allen Silk Mills and. 
an be procured by the yard only from 
[ansen and Co., Chicago, a personal 
riend of the Bishop. By a special 
greement between designer, manu- 
icturer and retailer it may be sold 
nly to Passionist Priests, Nuns or 
isters. This happens to be the only 
attern of all the Allen Silk Mills 
cclesiastical designs that is not the 
Fork of Father (now) Bishop Ap- 
olinaris Baumgartner of Guam. 



Through the thoughtfulness of Fa- 
ker Fidelis Rice, C.P., the "Sunday 
fisitor," carried the following: 

The recent fire which destroyed 
lenyon College in Ohio and took the 
ves of nine students has recalled the 
ast history of that institution and 
le fact that a famous convert to the 
atholic Church was once its presi- 
ent. 

James Kent Stone was appointed 
resident of Kenyon when he was 
nly 27 years of age. At that time 
is father was a minister of the Epis- 
Dpal Church in Boston, and was de- 
cribed by Daniel Webster as the 
aremost preacher of his day. 

James Kent Stone was a friend of 
•liver Wendell Holmes and, in his 
iter years, of the late Theodore 
loosevelt. Even though strongly at- 
racted to the Faith, he did not join 
he Catholic Church while he was at 
Lenyon, but after he was transferred 
rom it to become president of Hobart 
College at Geneva, New York. Both 



institutions are Episcopalian colleges. 

Convinced that 'the Roman Church 
is right,' Mr. Stone resigned the 
presidency of Hobart and began his 
formal study of the Catholic religion. 

Mr. Stone was a widower and the 
father of three children. Because he 
strongly desired to serve God as a 
priest, he placed his children in a 
boarding school and began his studies. 
They were soon adopted by a Catholic 
family, named O'Connor, and James 
Kent joined the Passionist Order. 

While preaching in the Cathedral 
in Baltimore, President Arthur and 
members of his Cabinet journeyed 
from Washington to hear him. He 
soon became a noted missionary and 
established houses of his Order in 
Buenos Aires, Cuba, Brazil, Spain and 
the United States. He was especially 
loved by the Negroes for whom he 
gave many missions. 



The Archbishop of Adelaide, Aus- 
tralia, requested that a life of Father 
Peter of the Mother of Sorrows, C.P. 
(Vide Passionist Vol. II, page 153) 
be written in pamphlet form and pub- 
lished; he also suggested that prayers 
be offered for miracles. His grave is 
being frequented and devotion to him 
spreading. Most Reverend Father 
General has given his approval that 
the preliminary steps be taken. If 
there are miracles and the devotion 
continues, the regular processes may 
be begun. It would be a great favor 
from God, if an English Speaking 
Passionist should receive the honors 
of the Altar! 



Mr. Timothy Sullivan, will be re- 
membered by many of our Brethren 



321 



as the "garzone" of Sacred Heart Re- 
treat in the thirties. On Friday even- 
ing, April 22nd, while on his way to 
the Sorrowful Mother Novena Devo- 
tions he was struck by an automobile 
while crossing Eastern Parkway in 
front of St. Joseph's Infirmary. 
Medical attention was given immedi- 
ately, but it was found that he had 
suffered a fracture of the skull be- 
sides severe internal injuries. In 
spite of every care he passed to 
eternity the following morning at 
7:55. Timothy Sullivan, known to 
all as "Tim" (he congenially resented 
being called Mr. Sullivan) was born 
in Marion Co., Ky. With the rest of 
the children he was left an orphan at 
an early age and was in consequence 
placed in St. Thomas Orphanage, 
Louisville. When about 7 or 8 years 
of age he was taken by the Harrison 
Family and remained with them till 
he was about 18. Besides a few 
years as janitor at St. Joseph Church, 
Bowling Green, Ky., the remainder of 
his life was spent with the Sisters of 
Charity of Nazareth and at Sacred 
Heart Retreat, Louisville. His death 
brought great sorrow to all that knew 



him, especially to the Sisters and thi 
Staff at St. Joseph's Infirmary. Her 
he took up his duties as "handy-man 
in 1933 when he left Sacred Heart R^ 
treat. He was more than a handi 
man, he really became part of th 
Community at St. Joseph's. Th 
Sisters aver that he was a man o 
solid and supernaturally simple faith 
He was a daily attendant at Hoi: 
Mass so much so that when the hou: 
of Mass at the Infirmary impeded hit 
duties he would attend at Mother o 
Sorrows Church across the street 
an earlier hour. Needless to say h 
was also a daily communicant. H<! 
was a familiar figure in the Infirmary 
Chapel, a Night Adorer, made ai 
hour's prayer daily after his dutie; 
were done and assisted at the dailj 
recitation of the Rosary by the Sister; 
of the Hospital. His funeral was held 
on the Monday after his death at 8:0( 
A.M. with a solemn High Mass ane 
the nurses forming the choir. As i 
last loving tribute the Sisters laid hin 
to rest in the Pruest section of theii 
own Community section at Nazareth 
Ky. R.I.P. 



At last our Blessed Maria Goretti has found a biographer 
to write her life in our own language. Fr. John Carr, C.SS.R., 
is the author of the rather brief (67 pages) but stirring booklet. 
It is printed in Dublin; can be obtained from the Newman 
Bookshop, Westminster, Md. 



322 



WORKS OF MINISTRY 

(The following enumeration does not pretend to be complete but aU is recorded that has come 
\o our notice and has not been published in a former issue of THE PASSIONIST) . 



MISSIONS 



Feb. 27-March 6 

Vlarch 6-13 

March 13-20 
March 20-27 



Mesa, Arizona. 

Lakeside, Calif. 
Prescott, Ariz. 
Maynard, Ohio 
Chandler, Ariz. 
San Gabriel, Calif. 



March 22-27 
March 27-April 3 



New Orleans, La. 
Mansura, La. 
Mammouth, 111. 
Groves, Texas 
Kansas City, Ks. 
Houston, Texas 
Brenhan, Texas 
Chicago, 111. 
March 27-April 10 New Orleans, La. 



March 28-31 
April 3-10 



April 10-15 
April 24-May 1 

May 1-15 

May 15-21 



March 10-19 
April 10-17 



Jan. 3i-Feb. 2 
Feb. 7-9 
Feb. 28-Mar. 3 
March 2-4 
March 4-6 

March 11-13 
March 17-20 
March 18-20 
March 25-27 
April 1-3 
April 5-6 



Buckeye, Ariz. 
Cathedral City, Calif. 
Altadena, Calif. 
Sacramento, Calif. 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Norwood, O. 
Oldenburg, Ind. 
Port Arthur, Texas 
Cuba City, Wise. 

Christopher, 111. 



Queen of Peace 

(Spanish) 
Perpetual Help 
Immaculate Heart 
St. Stanislaus 
St. Mary 
Old Mission 

St. Paul 
Perpetual Help 
Immac. Concept. 
Immac. Concept. 
Holy Spirit 
Sacred Heart 
St. Mary 

St. Francis Cabrini 
i^pihany 

St. Henry 

Sacred Heart 
Immac. Concept. 

St. Mary 

St. Matthew 
St. Anne 
St. James 
St. Rose 

St. Andrew 



RETREATS TO RELIGIOUS 

Los Angeles, Calif. St. Mary Academy 

Monroe, Mich. Holy Cross Bro's. 



Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Wyoming, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Alhambra, Calif. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Chicago, 111. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Glendale, O. 



LAY RETREATS 

Immaculata Hi 
Ursuline Academy 
St. James School 
S. Heart Academy 
S. Heart Retreat H. 
Holy Cross Monastery 
Holy Cross Monastery 
Hardey Prep. School 
Holy Cross Monastery 
Holy Cross Monastery 
Holy Cross Monastery 
High School 



Fr. Edward 

Fr. Roderick 
Fr. Basil 
Fr. Julius 
Fr. Basil 
Frs. Dunstan & 

Jerome 
Fr. Jeremias 
Fr. Cornelius 
Fr. Canute 
Fr. Bertrand 
Fr. Henry 
Fr. J. Aelred 
Fr. Kilian 
Fr. Carl 
Frs. Matthias &• 

Nathaniel 
Fr. Basil 
Fr. Roderick 
Fr. Alfred Mc. 
Frs. Pius & 

Dunstan 
Frs. Edward & 

Jerome 
Fr. Charles 
Fr. Valentine 
Fr. Emmanuel 
Frs. Flannon & 

Nathaniel 
Fr. Hilary 



Fr. Jerome 
Fr. Bernard 



Fr. Carl 
Fr. Valentine 
Fr. Carl 
Fr. Quentin 
Fr. Dunstan 
Fr. Edwin 
Fr. Edwin 
Fr. Barnabas 
Fr. Edwin 
Fr. Edwin 
Fr. Edwin 
Fr. Quentin 



323 



April 8-10 
April 11-13 
April 11-14 

April 13-16 
April 22-24 
April 29-May 1 

May 10-13 
May 11-13 



Feb. 27-March 1 
March 3-6 

March 13-15 

March 18-20 
March 20-22 
March 25-27 
March 27-29 
April 3-5 



April 10-12 
April 24-26 



May 1-; 



May 8-10 




February 


'11 


March 2 




March 16 




March 20 




March 27 




April 1 




April 3 




April ."> 




April 12 





Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Columbus, O. 
Monroe, Mich. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Owensboro, Ky. 
Uniontown, Ky. 
Leitchfield, Ky. 



Holy Cross Monastery 
Good Sam. Nurses 
Sacred Heart Hi. 
Central Hi. 
Good Sam. Nurses 
Holy Cross Monastery 
Holy Cross Monastery 
Ac C.P. Nuns 
St. Agnes School 
St. Joseph's 



FORTY HOURS 



Los Angeles, Calif. 
Hoisington, Ks. 
Henderson, Ky. 
Des Moines, la. 
Owensboro, Ky. 
Earling, la. 
Cedar Rapids, la. 
Carroll, la. 
Eagle Rock, Calif. 
Granger, la. 
Des Moines, la. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Raywick, Ky. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Holy Cross, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 
St. Joseph, Ky. 
Louisville, Ky. 



St.. Ceceilia 

St. John Ev. 

Holy Name 

St. Augustine 

Sts. Joseph & Paul 

St. Joseph 

Immac. Concep. 

Sts. Peter & Paul 

St. Bernard 

Assumption 

St. Anthony 

St. Williams 

St. Francis X. 

Resurrection 

Lady of Sorrows 

St. Columba 

Holy Cross 

St. Teresa 

St. Peter Claver 

St. Alphonsus 

St. Benedict 



RECOLLECTION DAYS 



Cincinnati, O. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Altadena, Calif. 
Duarte, Calif. 
Sierra Madre, Calif. 
Oklahoma City, 
Normandy, Mo. 

Altadena, Calif. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Normandy, Mo. 

Alton, 111. 

Siena Madre, Calif. 



Sacred Heart Academy 

Sacred Heart Academy 

St. Elisabeth 

S. Teresita San. 

Diocesan Clergy 

Villa Teresa 

Holy Family Parish 

(at Prep) 
St. Elisabeth 
Purcell Alumni 
St. Ann's Men 

(at Prep) 
Diocesan Clergy 
Diocesan Clergy 



LENTEN COURSES 

Cincinnati, O. Lady of Grace 

Cincinnati, O. St. Mark 

Bellevue, Ky. Sacred Heart 

Cincinnati, O. Holy Cross 



Fr. Edwin 
Fr. Edwin 
Fr. Quentin 
Fr. Robert 
Fr. Edwin 
Fr. Edwin 
Fr. Edwin 
Fr. Alfred 
Fr. Gilbert 
Fr. Arnold 



Fr. Jerome 
Fr. Agatho 
Fr. Gilbert 
Fr. Ignatius B. 
Fr. Alfred 
Fr. Wilfrid 
Fr. Canute 
Fr. Wilfrid 
Fr. Lambert 
Fr. Wilfrid 
Fr. Matthew 
Fr. Gordian 
Fr. Alfred 
Fr. Basil 
Fr. Marion 
Fr. Flannon 
Fr. Gilbert 
Fr. Julius 
Fr. Hubert 
Fr. Marion 
Fr. Julius 



Fr. Quentin 
Fr. Julius 
Fr. Roderick 
Fr. Jerome 
Fr. Damian 
Fr. Agatho 
Fr. Anthony 

Fr. Edward 
Fr. James 
Fr. Anthony 

Fr. Anthony 
Fr. Damian 



Fr. Quentin 
Fr. Quentin 
Fr. Nicholas S. 
Vv. Edwin 



324 



Cincinnati, 0. 


St. Leo 


Fr 


Carl 


Cincinnati, O. 


St. Matthew 


Fr 


Carl 


Dayton, Ky. 


St. Bernard 


Fr 


Charles 


Cincinnati, O. 


Holy Family 


Fr 


Charles 


Cincinnati, O. 


St. Stephen 


Fr 


Charles 


Berkeley, Mo. 


Holy Ghost 


Fr 


Regis 


Rolla, Mo. 


St. Patrick 


Fr 


Regis 


St. Louis, Mo. 


St. Engelbert 


Fr 


James 


Alton, 111. 


St. Matthew 


Fr 


Kevin 


Edwardsville, 111. 


St. Mary 


Fr 


Emil 


Normandy, Mo. 


Ascension 


Fr 


Germain 


Pine Lawn, Mo. 


St. Paul 


Fr 


Edgar 


St. Louis, Mo. 


St. Barbara 


Fr 


Ernest 


Webster Groves, Mo 


Sisters' College 
TRE ORE 


Fr 


Ernest 


Pamona, Calif. 


St. Joseph 


Fr 


Dunstan 


Pasadena, Calif. 


St. Andrew 


Fr 


Edward 


Glendale, Calif. 


Holy Family 


Fr 


Roderick 


Pasadena, Calif. 


St. Philip 


Fr 


Aiden 


Long Beach, Calif. 


St. Matthew 


Fr 


Damian 


Altadena, Calif. 


St. Elisabeth 


Fr 


Jerome 


/\rcadia, Calif. 


Holy Angels 


Fr 


Lucian 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


Precious Blood 


Fr 


Isidore 


Cincinnati, 0. 


St. Cecelia 


Fr 


Charles 


Columbus, O. 


Sacred Heart 


Fr 


Quentin 


Bellevue, Ky. 


Sacred Heart 


Fr 


Nicholas S 


Cincinnati, O. 


Sisters of Mercy Col. 


Fr 


Valentine 


Louisville, Ky. 


St. Agnes 


Fr 


Arnold 


CONFERENCES TO SISTERS 






Louisville, Ky. 


Loretto Sisters 


Fr 


. Julius 


Iiouisville, Ky. 


Sts. Mary & Elisabeth 


Fr 


. Julius 


Louisville, Ky. 


St. Joseph Infirm. 


Fr 


Hubert 


Louisville, Ky. 




Fr 


. Hubert 


Louisville, Ky. 


Little Srs. of Poor 


Fr 


. Julius 


Louisville, Ky. 


Sacred Heart Home 


Fr 


. Hubert 


Louisville, Ky. 


Mercy Academy 


Fr 


. Hubert 


Louisville, Ky. 


Loretto Srs. 


Fr 


Godfrey 


Louisville, Ky. 


Sts. Mary & Elis. 


Fr 


. Godfrey 


Ivouisville, Ky. 


St. Joseph Infirm. 


Fr 


. HulKlt 


I>ouisville, Ky. 


Mt. St. Agnes 


Fr 


Hubert. 


Louisville, Ky. 


Little Srs. of Poor 


Fr 


Julius 


Cincinnati, O. 


Holy Cross 


Fr 


Charles 




Immaculata 


Vr 


Charles 




Holy Name (O.P.) 


Fr 


. Valentine 




Infant Home 


Fr 


. Bernard 




(Srs. of Charity) 


Fr 


. Bernard 




St. .Joseph Orphanage 


Fr 


. Sylvester 




Good Samaritan Hosp. 


F. 


. Quentin 




St. Mary Hi. 


Fr 


Quentin 




Set. .11 Hi. 


Fr 


Quentin 




Madams of S. Heart, 


Fr 


Quentin 




Bros, of Holy Infant 


Fr 


. Bernard 



325 



Columbus, 0. 



Once a Month 



Columbus, O. 

Chillicothe, O. 
Portsmouth, O. 



Logan, O. 

Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

Hartwell, O. 



Sisters of Mercy 
Immac. Concept. 
St. Leo 
St. Mary 
St. M. Magdalen 
Lady of Victory 
Sacred Heart 
St. Jos. Academy 
St. Anthony Hosp. 
St. Francis Hosp. 
Mt. Carmel Hosp. 
Seminary 
Carmelite Nuns 
St. Mary 
St. Peter 
Holy Redeemer 
St. Mary 
Mercy Hosp. 
St. John 
Good Shepherd 
St. Clare Convent 



Fr. Bernard 
Fr. Bernard 
Fr. Bernard 
Fr. Bernard 
Fr. Bernard 
Fr. Bernard 
Fr. Bernard 
Fr. Bernard 
Fr. Bernard 
Fr. Bernard 
Fr. Bernard 
Fr. Bernard 
Fr. Bernard 
Fr. Bernard 
Fr. Bernard 
Fr. Bernard 
Fr. Bernard 
Fr. Bernard 
Fr. Bernard 
Fr. Valentine 
Fr. Valentine 




Out of the Mouths of Babes 

"Following an instruction at the children's mission in Good Shepher 
Church, Beverly Hills, California, a small child addressed the missionary 
'Father, may a lady who was divorced and now married to anoth< 
man, go to confession and Holy Communion?' The answer, of course 
was no, — unless, etc. A pause, then came the revealing question: 'Fathe 
will you please pray for my mother?' What lessons this mother coul 
learn from her child!" 

Fr. Edwin 



326 



HO IS WHO AND WHERE 



HOLY CROSS PROVINCE, MAY, 1949 



OME 

[alcolm 1 
oger 

IHICAGO 

lames Patrick 2 

oseph 3 
eil 4 
[erman 5 
ilian 7 
yril M 
ugustine 
•avid K 
.'Philip 
incent X 
lorbert 
lban 

ichard 9 
latthias 
lonrad 12 
oseph M IS 
ilan 40 
[enneth 
on ell 18 
juentin 10 
loward 17 
Jarnabas Mary 1! 
•aul F 10 
Vm. Gail 14 
^eo Patrick 
•aul 39 
Sodfrey 

Students 

Melvin 

Emmet 

Kent 

Kenan 

Ward 

iBernardine 

Venard 

Caspar 

Benedict Joseph 

John Mary 

Peter Claver 

Luke 

Clement 

Dominic 

Brothers 

Joseph 21 



Leo 23 

CINCINNATI 

Valentine 6 

Colum 7 

Aurelius 

Alphonsus 

Edwin 27 

Raphael 

Bernard 

Arthur 9 

Timothy 

Sylvester 

Nicholas 15 

Claude 

Daniel 

Emmanuel 

Joyce 

Leopold 

Donald 

Kenny 9 

Charles G. 25 

Thaddeus 10 

Carl 34 

Brothers 

Anthony 21. 22 
William 24 

LOUISVILLE 

Julius 5 
Gordian 7 
Isidore 
Adalbert 
Charles 
Lawrence 
Anselm 9 
Andrew 
Maurice 29 
Thomas 
Gilbert 39 
Hubert 42. 39 
Marion 
Camillus 41 
Austin 
Arnold 

Alfred 

Vincent M 16 

Cormac 10 

Flannon 

Campion 



John Bapt. 

Noel 

Forrest 

Keith 

Raymond 

Fergus 

Deacons 

Jordan 

Rene 

Warren 

Columban 

Alvin 

In Minor Ord. 

Carrol 

Randal 

Firmian 

Clyde 

Loran 

Simon 

Brothers 

Luke 23, 24 
Gabriel 31 
Casimir 22 
Denis 21 

ST. LOUIS 

Kyran 5 
Walter 7 
Celestine 44 
Herbert 45 
Kevin 
Edgar 45 

Ervan 45 

Anthony Mah. 

Regis 45 

Elmer 45 

Ernest 45 

Germain 45 

Cyprian 45 

James 45 

William Jos 45 

Emil 45 

Cronan 45 

Roch 39 

Leon 45 

Brothers 

James 43 



Bernard 21 
Conrad 24 
Regis 22, 21 
David 23 

ST. PAUL 

Robert Felix E 
Faustinus 6 
Egbert 7 
Matthew M 
Hyacinth 
Julian 
Edward 
George 
Agatho 
Christopher 9 
Brendan 
Cyprian F. 9 
Henry 
Paschal 
Miles 10 
Joel 11 

Brothers 

Louis 24 
Philip 21 
John 22, 31 
Thomas 
George 

Novices 

Francis Martin 

Carl Anthony 

Jude 

Justin Mary 

Sebastian 

DES MOINES 

Bernard Mary 5 

Canute 7 

Ignatius 

Louis 

Mai achy 

Martin 

Hilary 

Paulinus 

Peter 

Jeremias 

Robert 32 

Matthew V 39 



Wilfrid 

Nathaniel 

Ignatius B 35 

Ronan 

Thomas More 36 

John 37 

Stephen 38 

Students 

Paul Mary 

Augustine Paul 

Joachim 

Bede 

Barry 

J. Francis 

Marvin 

Victor 

Gail 

Aquinas 

J. Gabriel 

Myron 

Denis 

Albert 

Eugene 

Meinrad 

Bruce 

Berchmans 

Rian 

Brothers 

Romuald 23 
Columban 22, 31 
Felix 
Theodore 21 

DETROIT 

Clarence 5 

Benet 7 

Benedict 

David Ferl 

Alexis 

Justin 

Gerald 

Linus 

Boniface 

Gerard 

Mark 

Urban 

Ferdinand 

Roland 



327 



Fidelis 


Finan 10 


Ludger 


CHINA 


Patrick 9 


Roderick 


Canisius 




Theophane 


Jerome 


Mel 


Anthony Mai. 


Nilus 


Isidore R 25 




William W 20 


Cyril Jab 
Bartholomew 27 


Lucian 34 
Alfred MC 


FAIRFIELD 


Cyprian L 20 
James L'bt 20 


Harold 




Edmund 


Francis Fl 20 


Declan 25 


Brothers 




Harold Trav 20 


Brothers 


Richard 22 
Gerald 24 


SA'MENTO 


T T TV! I"17"I7D C! IT! 


Aloysius 21 


Patrick 21 


Angelo 8 


U JN l V H.KM 1 ] 


Gilbert 22 




Gabriel 


Gregory Jos 28 


SIERRA MADRE 


BIRMINGHAM 


Pius 


Frederick 28 
Leon 


Lambert 5 


Ralph 8 


HOUSTON 


Dun stan 7 


Cornelius 






Reginald 


Gregory Mc 


Aloysius 8 


CHAPLAINS 


Leo 9 


Terrence 


Stanislaus 


Fabian 


Basil 


Brice 


Bertrand 


Leonard 


Philip 


Bro. Henry 33 


John Aelred 


Xavier 


Aidan 




Conleth 25 


Brian 


Ed. Guido 


ENSLEY 


Bro. Daniel 33 


Nicholas G. 


Damian 27 


Eustace 8 







REFERENCES 



First Gen. Consultor SS. Giovanni e Paolo 24. 

Rome (147), Italy 25. 

Provincial 26. 

I Consultor 27. 

II Consultor 28. 
Rector 29. 
Master of Novices 30. 
Vicar 31. 
Superior 32. 
Pastor 33. 
Assistant 34. 
Vice Master 35. 
Lector of Church History 36. 
Lector of I and II Dogma Passion 37. 
Chaplain at Dunning 33. 
Chaplain for Passionist Nuns 

Lector of Can. Law, Liturgy 39. 

Director of Girls' Vocational Club 40. 

Provincial Secretary 41. 

Lector of Scripture I and II 

Catholic Mission 42. 
Passionist Fathers, Yuanling, Hunan 

China 43. 

Cook 44. 

Tailor, Inflrmarian 45. 

Refectorian 



Outside Brothers 

Director of Retreatants 

in U.S.A. 

Retreat Master 

Montreal 

Lector of S. Eloquence 

Retreat Organizer 

Porter 

Lector of History 

All around Brother 

Assistant Retreat Director 

Lector of English, Phil. II. 

Lector of Phil. I; Hist, of Phil. II 

Lector of Phil. Ill 

Lector of Hist, of Phil. I ; S. Passion 

Public Speaking 

Director 

Sign Fieldman 

Lector of Scripture HI and IV Passio 

IU and IV 

Lector of Moral, Pastoral Theol. |ui< 

Catechetics, Asceticism. 

Assistant Cook 

Chaplain at St. Vincent's 

Lector 



328 



Obtainable, piom 

*7lte PaUianld' 



1) Office of St. Gemma 

2) Mass of St. Gemma 

3) Additiones et Variationes in Officiis Propriis Congregationis 

4) Bound Passionist Bulletin No. 19 to 28 

5) "God's own Method" by Fr. Aloysius 

6) Catechism of the Principal Duties of a Passionist Religious 
j 7) Regulations of the Passionist Novice 

\ 8) Order to be observed by Choir At High or Solemn Mass 

I 

| 9) "A Retreat Souvenir" by Fr. Victor, C.P., translated by Fr. 
5 Edmund, C.P. 

I 

j 10) "THE PASSIONIST", 1948, bound. 

j 11) St. Gemma Galgani, by Fr. Osmund, C.P. 

12) Dominic Barbari by Fr. Osmund, C.P. 

. 13) The Love of Mary by D. Roberto. St. Gabriel's favorite book. 

' 14) Pictures of Bl. Mary Goretti. 




ASS10NIST 

ULLETINofHOLY cross province 





Vol. II 




No. 4-5 



July-September, 1949 
Ven. Dominic of the Mother of God 



THE PASSIONIST 

Bulletin of Holy Cross Province 



Vol. II, No. 4-5 



July-September, 1949 



Published bimonthly at the Sacred Heart Retreat, 1924 Newburg Road, Louisville 5, Ky., U.S.A. 
Issued each January, March, May, July, September and November. Financed by free-will 
offerings from readers. There is no Copyright. The paper is a private publication "proi 
manuscripto." 



IN THIS ISSUE 



S. Congregation of Rites 329 

Vox Patris 333 

Ven. Father Dominic 337 

Brother Luke 342 

Our Pride and Joy 346 

The Mystical Body 352 

Sorrows of Mary 357 

Missionary Forum 363 

More Thoughts on Prayer 367 

Passionist Customs 371 



Ius Particulare 373 

Obituary 376 

General Curia 3801 

St. Paul of Cross Province 384 

Holy Cross Province 398 

Passionist Nuns 415 

Passionist Sisters 417 

Varia 418 

Works of the Ministry 420 

Who is Who 421 



"The Passionist" aims at a deeper knowledge of the purpose of our Congregation and at 
closer attainment of said purpose. Cooperation is invited. Consequently, contributions by anyj 
member of the Congregation along the lines of news, past or present, of general or provincial 
interest ; articles dogmatic, ascetical, canonical or of historical value for us, are welcome. Alscl 
photographs of recent or historic C.P. events are helpful towards the ideal "The Passionist" 
strives to reach. Especially at present does "The Passionist" wish to establish and conduct the! 
Missionary Forum. 



Decree 

>f the 

^acred 

Zongrega.- 

:ion 

>f 

Rites 



Free translation taken from L'Os- 
ervatore Romano August 3, 1949.) 



BLESSED VINCENT MARY 
STRAMBI proved himself a 
erfect follower of St. Paul of the 
Jross, his Father and Founder. As 

very young priest the Saint re- 
eived him into his Congregation 
nd from the very beginning of 
is religious life he disclosed to 
rhat high degree of sanctity he 
|ras to ascend. 

On the Sacred Missions he re- 
trieved innumerable souls for Jesus 
Jhrist not only by his preaching 
ut principally by the austerity of 
is life and the most severe pen- 
inces. 

After having been elected Bishop 
f Macerata and Tolentino by Pope 
•ius VII he fulfilled his pastoral 




duties to perfection. He suffered 
exile because he refused to take 
the impious oath demanded by the 
French invaders. Weakened by the 
weight of years, by his labors and 
by his penances he requested the 
removal of the episcopal duties 
from the newly elected Pope Leo 
XII. The Holy Father acceded to 
the request of the venerable old 
man but insisted that he make his 
residence in the Apostolic Palace. 
Here he died a saintly death on 
January 1st, 1824. 

The honors of Beatification were 
conferred upon this renowned Ser- 
vant of God in 1925 by Pope Pius 
XI after all the legal requirements 
has been complied with. 



329 



Further miracles were wrought 
by Almighty God through the 
intercession of Blessed Vincent 
Mary ; consequently his case for 
Canonization was officially taken up 
November 25th, 1925. With Apos- 
tolic authority judicial processes 
were opened both in the diocesan 
Curia of Oria and in that of 
Naples concerning two miraculous 
cures that were said to have taken 
place. The validity of these pro- 
cesses was affirmed by the decrees 
of July 17th, 1929 and February 
1st, 1933 for the processes of Oria ; 
the processes of Naples were con- 
firmed by a decree dated July 30th, 
1944. 

I. Josephine Arno of Manduria, 
in the diocese of Oria, 75 years of 
age, was afflicted with a very large 
cyst on the ovaries. The weight 
and size of this cyst put the woman 
in a critical condition. This tumor 
would not respond to natural nor 
medical treatment; the only reme- 
dy was a surgical operation, but 
this was out of the question on 
account of the condition of the 
sick woman. However, what neither 
the forces of nature nor human 
ingenuity could bring about was 
obtained through the intercession 
of Blessed Vincent Mary Strambi, 
who was called upon with fervent 
prayer. In the space of a few days, 
about the middle of May 1926 all 
signs of the abnormal phenomena 
disappeared without any human 
intervention. 



II. The other cure took place or 
a little girl by the name of As^ 
sunta D'Agostino who was afflictec 
with a serious inflammation of th< 
thigh-bone. Having called upor 
Blessed Vincent Mary the child was 
immediately and perfectly cured 
Also this cure, considering all th< 
circumstances was considered mir 
aculous by the unanimous consen 
of the physicians. 

Following the directions of Can 
on Law on June 24th, 1947 th< 
Antepreparatory Meeting wai 
called in presence of the Most Rev 
erend Cardinal Alexander Verde 
Ponens of the case; after this th< 
Preparatory Meeting was held oi 
February 1st of this year. Eventu 
ally on the 21st of June the Gen 
eral Meeting was held in preseno 
of His Holiness Pope Pius XII 
In this meeting the Most Reverent 
Cardinal proposed to discuss th* 
question : Whether, after the Apos 
tolic See had conceded the venera 
tion of the Blessed Person in ques 
tion, it was certain that the pro 
posed miracles took place an- 
whether they took place in connec 
tion with the question at hand 
The Most Reverend Cardinals, th 
Official Prelates and the Reverenj 
Consultors all gave their vote. Bu 
the Holy Father preferred to defej 
his sentence until this July 31si 
the 8th Sunday after Pentecost 
so that by his repeated prayers a 
well as of those present the Divinf 
Will might become more manifes 



330 



His Holiness then called to His 
Dresence the Most Reverend Car- 
linal Alexander Verde, Ponens in 
;he case and the undersigned Pre- 
fect of the Sacred Congregation of 
Elites, as well as the Reverend Fa- 
;her Salvatore Natucci, General 
Promotor of the Faith and the Sec- 
retary. Then His Holiness, after 
laving devoutly offered the Holy 
Sacrifice, decreed that: "It is cer- 
;ain that Josephine Arno was per- 
fectly and relatively instantly 
lured of a large and incurable cyst 
)f the ovary; and also that the 
ittle girl Assunta D'Agostino was 
instantly and perfectly cured of a 
?rave inflammatory infection of the 
thigh-bone." 

His Holiness then ordered that 
this decree be legally promulgated 
and also be placed in the archives 
Df the Congregation of Rites. 



After the completion of these 
solemnities of the Sacred Congre- 
gation of Rites on Sunday, July 
81st, the Postulator of the Cause 
jf Blessed Vincent Mary Strambi, 
the Very Reverend Giles of the 
Sacred Hearts presented the follow- 
ing address to His Holiness, ex- 
pressing the devoted homage of the 
Superior General of the honorable 
Congregation of St. Paul of the 
Cross, the Most Reverend Father 
Albert of the Addolorata. 

Most Holy Father: The present 
lecree approving the miracles 
vr ought by Almighty God through 



the intercession of Blessed Vincent 
Mary Strambi, Passionist Bishop 
of Macerata and Tolentino, re- 
joices the hearts of all devoted to 
him. In the decree they see his 
solemn Canonization approaching 
very near. Especially do the Pas- 
sionists rejoice and they all offer 
deepest thanks to Your Holiness, 
together with the City of Civita- 
vecchia, the home-town of Blessed 
Vincent, and the diocese of Macera- 
ta and Tolentino, which were gov- 
erned by him with such wisdom 
and virtue. 

During the Holy Year of 1925 
Your august predecessor, Pius XI, 
fulfilling the wish of another Pon- 
tiff, Leo XII, an admirer and con- 
fidant of our Blessed, raised him 
to the honors of the altars. And 
now Providence seems to have re- 
served for Your Holiness the su- 
preme glorification of Blessed Vin- 
cent during the coming Holy Year 
of 1950. And the times are ripe for 
such a Canonization: for Blessed 
Vincent Mary Strambi in the fa- 
tigues of the Apostolate, in the 
exile heroically suffered in defense 
of the rights of the Church, in the 
generous offer of his life to obtain 
health from God for the Supreme 
Pontiff, all this will be a wonderful 
example and an inspiration to work 
zealously for the salvation of souls, 
to always remain faithful to the 
laws of the Church and to revere 
supremely and lore the Vicar of 
Jesus Christ. 



:\:\\ 



Most Holy Father, may the ami- 
able and magnanimous figure of 
our Blessed Vincent be of comfort 
to Your heart afflicted by the per- 
secutions which rage in so many 
parts of Europe and especially may 
he be a source of comfort in face 
of the outrages against your own 
august person. 

With these wishes, prostrate at 
the foot of Your throne I implore 



Your Apostolic Blessing for the en\ 
tire Congregation of the Passiom 
ists, for the City of Civitavecchia\ 
for the dioceses of Macerata am 
Tolentino. 

The paper clipping from which th 
above translation was made an 
which was sent from our Genera 
Curia had a small note inclose* 
which read: "REV.MUS PATEI 
OMNIBUS SALUTEM DICIT." 



"THE STRANGE SIGN" 

Cross has patron devotees 
Embracing Christ 
Upon their knees. 

Universe and angels kneel 

Souls of men 

Bend to bloody seal. 

Wood empurpled 
Shining shaft of life. 
Death of One eternal 
Unique in strife. 

Sign so strange 
Strange as truth. 
Happiness eternal 
Blood is meat forsooth. 

The sign God blissed 

The saints loved and kissed. 




Fr. Austin, C. P. 



332 



V 



o 



p 



°r 



R 






i 



J AUL OF THE CROSS, General of 
the Discalced Clerics under the 
tie of the Most Holy Cross and Pas- 
ion of Jesus Christ. To all our be- 
>ved Priests, Clerics, Lay-brothers, 
nd Oblates of the Congregation: 

NEARLY beloved, I can exclaim 
* in the presence of the Most 
igh God : Iusta et vera sunt ju- 
icia tua, Domine, et non est qui 
ossit resistere voluntati tuae. You 
II know that I tried to anticipate 
le General Chapter by a year or 
lore because of the lively desire I 
ave to retire into the profound 
plitude of one of our Retreats, in 
rder to think only of staying at 
le feet of Jesus in the Bl. Sac- 
iment that I might mourn over 
ly faults night and day, and pre- 
ire myself in oratione et ieiunio, 
i silentio, et in spe for a holy 
eath. For this reason I tried to 



' <3 


\ 




% 




s 


^ * ^ 




.1 


li 











use all possible diligence to escape 
even the least charge. In spite of 
this and not to resist the Divine 
Will signified to me through the 
Venerable General Chapter, I con- 
sent to sacrifice myself anew at the 
post of General which the Chapter 
has placed upon me. Yesterday 
morning I was again elected Gen- 
eral of the Congregation and I 
immediately silently adored the Di- 
vine Will in the event. In sub- 
mission to It I accepted the bur- 
den. And so I embrace in spirit 
the Holy Cross, and I embrace you 
all in the Sacred Side of Jesus. 
My mind is made up to serve your 
souls in the best way the mercy of 
God permits me as long as it pleas- 
es the Lord. And so with my face 
in the dust, I pray you all, dearly 
beloved brethren and Sons in Jesus 
Christ to charitably accept this 

333 



sign of my service and the love 
which I have always had and al- 
ways will have towards you. Help 
me by your fervent prayers and 
Holy Sacrifices to beg of Our Lord 
a docile heart, a humble spirit, a 
meek, prudent, constant and strong 
spirit to be able to keep inviolable 
the observance of our Holy Rules 
and Constitutions, to repair any 
abuses which might occur (which 
God forbid!) by admonishing of- 
fenders with true charity and chas- 
tise those with equity and justice 
who remain in their vices and lack 
of observance after charitable ad- 
monitions. I pray you, beloved, 
help me bear this burden of gov- 
erning the Congregation by leading 
lives so observant of the Rules and 
so holy that I may exclaim from a 
joyful heart with the Apostle : Vos 
estis gaudium meum et corona mea. 
All of this will come to pass if, 
as you continually grieve for the 
Passion and Death of our Divine 
Redeemer in your outward habit, 
you become a living portrait of 
Jesus Christ as dead to all that is 
not God in the habitual exercise 
of holy virtue. 

Above all, beloved, let there be 
in you a true and perfect charity 
uniting your hearts so closely that 
there may be but one heart and 
one will in God. Place yourselves 
so completely in the hands of your 
Superiors that they can do with 
you what they want, whenever it 
is not opposed to the divine law, 



quod absit, and to the holy on 
servance of the Rules and Const! 
tutions which each of you must vi 
with one another to observe mos 
exactly. You know that Jesu 
Christ was made obedient unti 
death and even to the death 
the Cross. And so you must dil 
to yourselves, renouncing your ow« 
opinions and desires. Renouncn 
dearly beloved, all your own intei 
tions, judgments, and desires, pui 
ting them to death for your Supd 
riors. Unless you give yourselvd 
into the hands of obedience as or* 
dead you will not be able to tastj 
what the service of God is. 

Thirst to break your will as tr 
stag thirsts for water. Count th 
day lost when you have not broke 
your will or subjected it to som 
one. Offer your will in sacrifice 1 
God and you will feel the deepe 
contentment. The more obedieE 
you are the more quiet and indi 
ferent you will be to one office < 
another, because you will be tru 
espoused to obedience and will \o\ 
it tenderly and reverently in Jes« 
Christ Who is the great King < 
the obedient. In this way you w; 
render yourselves better fitted 
help Holy Church and our po< 
Congregation with your prayer 
because Jesus listens to the prayei 
of the obedient. 

I have dwelt rather at length 
this advice concerning obedient 
because obedience is the foundatic 
stone of the spiritual edifice. 



1 



334 



u are perfectly obedient you will 
50 be humble in mind and heart 
d soul; you will be meek, peace- 
1, a lover of silence. You will flee 
^ular influences with all your 
*ength, not treating with seculars 
necessarily and superfluously, 
lich is the pest of devotion. You 
11 guard your exterior senses to 
lintain solitude and recollection. 
iur mind will be raised on high 
the Most High God in continual 
ayer which will become familiar 
th you even in your external 
irks, journeys, and whatever else 
u do through holy obedience. 
iu will love suffering, self-depre- 
ition; and your riches will con- 
,t in seeing yourself poor, abject, 
Id despised. If you are obedient 
u will beware of the eyes of self- 
re which are these : the right eye 
this monster is love of reputa- 
n, esteem, and praise; the left 
b is love of our own convenience, 
ft up these two interior eyes 
d then all will be in peace and 
*re will be a great victory gained 
er self-love per Jesum Christum 
minum nostrum. 

Rectors especially and all who 
vern ought to be examples of 
*tue to their subjects. And such 
ey will be if armed with faith, 
ist in God and assiduous prayer 
ey beware of the eyes of that 
eked self-love we have spoken of 
ove. Oh, what a pest is attach- 
mt to one's own reputation, 
aise, honor; Oh what ruin is 



caused by love of one's own con- 
venience! Oh! beloved, beloved, 
seek this with all your might, for 
if self-love is mastered, what light 
will be yours in the interior eyes 
of your soul ! How humble of heart 
you will be, how meek and chari- 
table with your subjects! You will 
keep seculars far from your Re- 
treats, and if it is necessary to 
speak with them you will dismiss 
them soon and send them on their 
way full of the good odor of Jesus 
Christ. You will be assiduous at 
prayer, at choir and towards all 
that pertains to the divine worship 
and the holy regular observance. 
You will indeed be a model of per- 
fection. Your subjects, seeing your 
holy example will vie with one an- 
other and be more holy, and you 
will turn your Retreats into real 
gardens of every virtue so that the 
Divine Sovereign Spouse Christ 
Jesus will take His delight therein. 
How my poor heart will rejoice 
when I have the new happiness of 
your vigilance and your holy work 
in maintaining the observance of 
our Holy Rules and Constitutions 
inviolable! On the other hand how 
insupportable it would make the 
burden of the government of the 
Congregation which you have 
placed on my shoulders in the Ven. 
General Chapter, if I had news to 
the contrary, which God forbid! 
Then I could but eat the bread of 
sorrow and drink the water of 
tears, mourning my unhappy days 



335 



and crying to the Lord to take me 
from this life at once that I might 
not see such an evil ruin. There- 
fore, console my miserable old age. 
Help me bear the cross of this diffi- 
cult office which I have willingly 
embraced in submission to the di- 
vine will to serve you. United let 
us labor with great zeal and fideli- 
ty, with great purity of intention 
and humility of heart that in every 
Son of this Congregation is kept 
the most exact observance of our 
Holy Rules and Constitutions, of 
the Regulations which are a com- 
pendium of the same, and also of 
the other decrees made or to be 
made during Sacred Visitations. 
These are the ramparts to guard 
the holy regular observance. In 
this way the Sovereign Giver of all 



good will be blessed, glorified, ai 
praised in our life by all peopl' 
and nations. Imploring the chari 
of your holy prayers ever more, 
beloved brethren and Sons in X\ 
Lord, I pray and will ever beg fro 
His Divine Mercy the most abu 
dant blessings for you. May tin 
true peace which surpasses 
understanding keep your hear 
ever in Christ Jesus our Lor 
Amen. 

Given in this Holy Retreat 
San Angelo, Feb. 23, 1758. 

I ask the Fr. Rector to have th 
letter read once a year on tl 
above mentioned date, Feb. 23rd 

General and Serva- 



(The third General Chapter was held Feb. 22, 1758. Our Holy Founder's plan for retirenn 
was opposed and he was again elected General. A rescript from Pope Benedict XIV, June 
1757 had dispensed that point of the Rule which forbids a third successive term. Seeing 
evident will of God St. Paul submitted in obedience. After the Chapter he sent this Circu 
Letter to all the Religious. Fr. Mark Aurelius, who was chosen Provincial in this Chapt 
liked it so much that he ordered it read twice every year: during the Novenas for Christnj 
and the Assumption.) 



Dull hued, indeed, am I, the flower, 
If Faith, the root, be dry, 

But nourished with the Precious Blood 
The fruit is Christ, not I. 



336 



?r Mariam 



UntmthU 3fla%r inmtntr 



anil 



Sty* Mat^t of (goi 

IB4B August 1043 



HIS past August has marked the 
centenary of the death of a 
•eat Passionist apostle, Venerable 
ominic of the Mother of God. 
wo years ago the Catholic world 
ined in commemorating the birth 
the Faith of England's greatest 
?ht, Cardinal Newman. The lives 
id association of these two heroic 
eures of the last century have be- 
>me common knowledge. In par- 
cular the deeper study of New- 
an's conversion has given some 
icognition to Ven. Dominic's true 
ace in the rebirth of English 
atholic life. It has been gratify- 
ig for every Passionist to see in 
lis a fulfillment of the revelation 
ur Holy Founder received in the 
rening of his life concerning his 
>ns in England. It had come after 
ng and constant prayer for the 
mntry he first took to his heart 
hile in retreat at Castellazzo. 
r hen the time came for a new 
nglish mission it was fitting that 
assionists have part in the work, 
hat this work in a land long since 
idicated to God's Virgin Mother 
lould have become the crowning 



labor of life of such a Passionist 
as Father Dominic of the Mother 
of God deserves closer considera- 
tion. 

During the Protestant revolt 
England had clearly sinned in try- 
ing to depose its Heavenly Queen. 
It succeeded only in defaming her 
person and prerogatives. In time 
devotion to Mary became one of 
the foremost barriers in the way of 
reunion with the Church of Rome. 
However long ages of faith in Eng- 
land had consecrated the land in a 
particular way to the Virgin Moth- 
er of God. Yet after their sever- 
ance with the Church men sought 
to destroy the very monuments of 
their former loyalty and to free 
themselves from remembrance and 
remorse. But a favor done for the 
Mother of God is a favor never 
forgotten. If the men of England 
had once entrusted their part of 
the world to Mary, so, it seems, 
had God. The work of conversion 
then could appropriately be left to 
the direction of her who alone dis- 
pels all heresies from the hearts 
of her wayward children. 

837 



When at last the time had come 
for the Faith to grow again in 
England Our Lady chose wisely for 
the work she had in view. From 
the life of Dominic Barberi it be- 
comes clear that he was among the 
first of those destined to fill this 
important mission for Mary. In 
many instances we can trace the 
ways in which she prepared her 
apostle and how he courageously 
placed himself at her command. 

As it was with many saints, the 
beginnings of this singular filiation 
stretch back to the deathbed of a 
child's earthly mother. Young 
Dominic, just twelve, witnessed the 
death of his mother, Maria An- 
tonia. He then realized a new need 
in his life, felt at such a time as 
one all his own. So Dominic went 
where Maria Antonia would have 
told him to go, to another Maria, 
to a new Mother. With large warm 
tears running down his face he 
told Mary simply, "From now on 
you will be my Mother." And we 
may believe that Mary said quietly 
to herself, "And you shall be my 
son." Dominic then added the 
watchword of his entire life. "I 
hope in you, in you I trust." 

The vocation of Dominic Bar- 
beri, however, evolved slowly e- 
nough ; but it was under the sure 
guidance of the Mother of God. 
When at first it seemed that he 
would be drafted into the Napole- 
onic War and not be able to ask 
admission into the Passionist 



Brotherhood, he was unexpected 
deferred. Others might have call 
it luck; Dominic knew that it w 
because at Mary's own urging 
had enrolled in the Confraterni 
of her Holy Rosary. Then, too, 
had vowed to become a Passionii 
Mary must see to its fulfillmei 
But another trouble soon set its* 
to block Dominic's ideal. His na 
ging uncle had determined that r. 
young nephew should marry ai 
have nothing more to do with t 
ragged exiled monks who h; 
sought a makeshift refuge in the 
drowsy little Italian town. Ho 1 
ever, the strange attraction of a 
habit Mary had modelled and tj 
simple ways of the religious hi 
laid strong hold on the heart 
the lad from Viterbo. Then r 
uncle grew insistent. Dominic wt 
perhaps a little more over-confide 
than over-trusting. He became co 
fused. Perhaps, he thought, 
would be better for him to marr 
Dominic wavered, then soon fell i 
In a dream he was granted tl 
privilege of seeing Mary plead ai 
obtain for him the grace to folio 
his religious vocation. Dominic 
covered and headed for the cloiste 

At two distinct times Domii 
was assured by God of his futu 
missionary apostolate. Once whi 
home, and again as a novice wht 
praying before an altar of tl 
Blessed Virgin. At this time it w; 
further revealed to him that 1 
was to labor especially in that lai 



338 



,hat once loved Mary and that 
Mary still loved so well. From that 
noment on Mary shared her love 
'or England with her own chosen 
ipostle. Brother Dominic at last 
)ecame a Passionist cleric and 
started out on the important intel- 
ectual training for his work. In 
March of 1818 he undertook the 
acred obligations of the priest- 
ood. The glories that day en- 
raved on his heart and soul the 
oung priest has left us in his 

ialogue with the Blessed Virgin. 

e had to speak of his joys. No 
ne could listen as knowingly as a 

other. His Mother was in Heav- 
m; there too was Dominic's con- 
versation. 

' Other books followed fast from 
the pen of the brilliant young 
)riest and lector. Among his many 
vritten works we may single out 
lis special Treatise on the Sorrows 
)f Mary and the Marilogia, on her 
jxcellence and singular privileges. 
\t times Father Dominic was fa- 
/ored with visions of Our Lady, 
[n all his work for souls he strove 
;o extend devotion to her. Once 
vhile travelling he fell into a swol- 
len stream. He was saved by call- 
ing out her holy name. 

For some time Father Dominic 
lad been watching the progress of 
English affairs, though his own 
missionary journey still seemed but 
i dream. He sought no work but 
that of obedience. But confidently 
he prayed to the Mother of Hope 



while she was secretly getting 
things ready for the work of his 
heart. 

John Henry Newman returned 
from his Roman tour on July 9th, 
1833. It was the feast of Our 
Lady of Holy Hope. In his pocket 
he carried his canticle of hope, 
the Lead Kindly Light. It was the 
hymn that symbolized his trust as 
it was to be the anthem of his 
future followers who too were still 
far from home. The Oxford Move- 
ment which would mean so much 
for the Church in England was 
soon under way. Ultimately it was 
to carry many of its leaders into 
the bosom of the Church. Fifteen 
years later Newman, renewed by 
the oil of priestly consecration a- 
gain returned from Rome to his 
own beloved land. This time he 
carried with him some pictures of 
Our Lady of Holy Hope for his 
spiritual father, Dominic. Perhaps 
Newman then felt what Dominic 
had long since known : Mary was 
to be England's hope for receiving 
the Light of the World. 

It had been with a glad and 
grateful heart that Father Dom- 
inic at last entered England. Well 
known and appraised is the difficult 
task laid upon him. His daring to 
live out his convictions in the face 
of opposition and bigotry was the 
occasion for many retiring Catho- 
lics to revalue their beliefs, and it 
gave the necessary stimulus for a 
fair number of Anglicans to enlist 

S39 



under the standard and shield of 
the Catholic Faith. The greater 
amount of Father Dominic's work 
was with the industrial classes, 
with Irish immigrants and the 
poor. He saw their need as the 
greatest of the times. His care for 
them, his constant mission work 
among them, his very presence 
gradually instilled a new virility 
into their sense of things Catholic, 
along with more constant faith. 
This perhaps is one reason why 
the working classes in England 
even a century later make up the 
majority of the Catholic population. 
No less did Father Dominic's 
spirit foster the regeneration of 
religious life after the long dark 
years of hiding and fear. He 
speedily obtained stability for his 
own Congregation, founding Re- 
treats and building churches. He 
publicly wore and preached in habit 
and sandals on every possible oc- 
casion. From his first days in Eng- 
land he gave retreats to Clergy and 
Religious at all important Catholic 
centers. It was his constant aim 
to align every available spiritual 
force in the Catholic cause. When 
he noticed the attraction of the 
laity for ecclesiastical ritual he at 
once made full use of the teaching 
power of the Church's liturgy. 
Without precedent in those conser- 
vative times he organized the first 
Corpus Christi procession to be 
held in England since pre-Reforma- 
tion days. For his medieval-mind- 

340 



ed contemporaries Father Domini 
chose Gothic architecture for hi 
first Church at Stone; and for thi 
work he enlisted A. W. Pugin, thi 
foremost architect of the day. T 
all Anglicans who sought the escH 
teric emotions of Ritualism Father 
Dominic was proud to present I 
full array of Catholic observance 
It was Father Dominic's task t< 
accustom men's minds to gaze oi 
Truth. It was no easy work h< 
had been directed to by the Mothe) 
of God. Yet Father Dominic ha« 
acquired an accurate insight as t« 
the extent and significance of th4 
work in which he formed so vita 
a part. However it was not withll 
out a deep realization of his owh 
utter powerlessness. At times hi 
most ardent labors seemed triflinj 
when at every turn he met witl 
the coldness of indifference. "Italil 
an fire," he wrote, "is not enougt 
to enkindle the hearts of Englishl 
men. For that we want the heav 
enly fire that comes from Got 
only." Then of a sudden God la 
His servant exultantly watch Hi; 
lightning fire the skies of Anglil 
canism and Dominic looked an* 
found Newman at his feet humbl; 
begging to be received into the on> 
true fold of Christ. "All that 
have suffered since I left Italy,' 
Dominic related to his Father Gen 
eral, "is well compensated by sucl 
a happy event as this." The worlc 
still hears the rumble of that shod 
which sent the structure of Prot 



estantism toppling from its basis 
of sand. 

A new day had come for Mary's 
England. Father Dominic had been 
a fitting instrument of the Mother 
of God. His work in the country 
lasted but a short eight years, yet 
he will ever remain a leading figure 
of the English Catholic resurgence. 

It has been said that before the 
end of time the world will witness 
the dawn of a new Marian age. We 
do not know when it will be upon 
us. But is it mere conjecture to 
look for its first signs in a land 
that once so boasted of being the 
possession of the Mother of God? 
Could the Heart of Mary soon for- 
get a people that began so early 
to sing her praise? Because then 
of Venerable Dominic's singular 
mission in England may we not 
see in him one of Our Lady's first 
legates in her crowning work of 
the ages. True, he was as one con- 
sumed in the first dark watches 
before dawn, but one who shone 
as the day star heralding her who 



"cometh forth as the morning ris- 
ing, fair the moon, bright as the 
sun." 

To us a century away it may 
seem strange that there were not 
still greater results from the re- 
birth of the Church in England. 
For so many souls its success has 
been hardly more than meager. 
The early sanguine stages of the 
revival point to a greater media- 
tion of grace than was actually 
corresponded with. We cannot be 
sure. Yet there is every reason to 
hope that England will at last fully 
respond to the warm appeal of 
Mary's heart, and in the end Eng- 
land's Second Spring will be an 
eternal one. Meanwhile, to further 
this work of Catholic unity in our 
day we may hopefully pray that 
Mary will speed the time when her 
own apostle, Venerable Dominic, 
because of his faithful service for 
her, will for all generations be 
called Blessed. 



a\x. «s 



zxnaxcuns, 



Mm, £.<P. 




341 



Per Astpcra 



(Bolbm HubtW 



(1899-1949) 



LJ ALF a century of service in 
1 the cause of Christ Crucified! 
Such was the grand total of the 




Brother Luke, C.P. 



years for Brother Luke Kirby on 
Monday, May 16, 1949. A solemn 
High Mass was fittingly offered 
for the venerable jubilarian in St. 
Agnes Church by the community 
of Sacred Heart Retreat. Very Rev 
Fr. Rector delivered the commem- 
orative address, setting forth the 
sanctity and religious dignity of 
the Brotherhood. 

The event of a golden jubilee ini 
the life of a Passionist Brother is' 
more than remarkable. A much 
celebrated English poem tells the} 
dramatic episode of a soul that'| 
sought to escape Christ: "I fled: 
Him down the nights and down the* 
day, I fled Him down the arches 
of the years." What must be the 
living poetry, then, of a Passionisti 
religious who has persevered withi 
Christ literally by day and by night! 
and down the arches of fifty years! 
We know that the thought of a 
similar generous persistence was in 
the Sacred Heart of Christ at thei 
Last Supper when He declared to 
His disciples, "You are they who 
have continued with me in my 
trials. And I appoint to you a 
kingdom, even as my Father has 
appointed to me" (Luke 22:28). 



342 



To speak a good word in due time, 
then, our sincerest appreciation 
and hearty congratulations! 

While the story of those fifty 
years is best known to the God 
Who gave them, it will not be 
without interest to Passionists in 
this country to review some of 
their various scenes. 

Born in Pittsburg on June 25, 
1881, Edward Kirby was the 
youngest of six children. He was 
baptized at old St. Patrick's par- 
ish, where he also made his First 
Holy Communion and later learned 
to serve Mass. 

When Edward was 15, he got 
some highly impressive news about 
the Passionist Fathers "on the 
hill." His dad occasionally went to 
the monastery church and was 
much edified by the Apostolic spirit 
of its priests. He said as much to 
his son. Moreover, some visiting 
priest also remarked about the sin- 
gular charity that he had met at 
the hands of these religious. Coup- 
led with their virtue went a keen 
theological learning. As the visi- 
tor remarked, "If I want to solve 
any moral cases, I always go to 
them." Such praise did not pass 
the young Edward unheeded. Al- 
though he could then grasp but 
little of what moral cases were, he 
decided to visit the monastery to 
settle a personal case of a religious 
vocation. The visit was a happy 
one and when subsequently he did 
apply for the Brotherhood, the only 



hesitation was Fr. Master's. "He 
looks so frail," he objected. Old 
Fr. Luke, who had just celebrated 
his golden jubilee of priesthood put 
in for the new postulant. "He may 
look weak but he might turn out 
the strongest." That settled the 
Master and Edward became Bro. 
Luke of the Immaculate Concep- 
tion. 

A year and a day — happy and 
halcyon — was passed in the Noviti- 
ate and on May 16, 1899 he pro- 
nounced his perpetual vows and 
received the venerable sign, that 
sacred coat of arms to be borne in 
a great battle until death. 

Hardly had the brethren given 
their newly-professed Brother the 
pax when they were telling him 
farewell. He was being sent to 
West Hoboken as assistant cook. 
His stay in West Hoboken, how- 
ever, was a short one of two years 
and then came an appointment to 
St. Louis. That was the beginning 
of a religious odyssey of obedience 
that took him throughout the East 
and middle West. Four years in 
St. Louis were followed by two 
more in Louisville. Here it was 
literally the Passionists' "Old Ken- 
tucky Home" that he came to know 
since in 1905 the mission house 
was still in existence. His stay. 
however, crested only the transi- 
tion from the old to the new build- 
ing and then in 1907 Brother Luke 
was on his way east to Dunkirk. 

At this time great things were 



543 



transpiring in the annals of Ameri- 
can Passionists. Their numbers 
had grown so great that a second 
Western Province was established. 
Thus it happened that in 1908 Bro. 
Luke was not only sent to the 
Western Province but to its west- 
most house — Kansas. "Terrible hot 
and muddy roads" is his word- 
picture of those days. The muddy 
roads have since given way to 
paved highways but the only reme- 
dy for the heat, when it comes, 
is patience. A surprising note for 
us today is that the Brother Sac- 
ristan in those days had to bake 
the hosts to be used for Mass. 

Next came a transfer to Chicago 
which lasted but 9 months and 
this was followed by a return to 
Kansas, where Brother not only 
saw but helped with the erection 
of the new Retreat. When three 
years passed, St. Paul was changed 
for Louisville and that, in short 
turn, for St. Louis. 

These were war years now and 
Brother recalls with no less satis- 
faction than amazement how he 
and the Bishops of the country 
were once classed together — non- 
combatants! In spite of his status 
Brother sustained injuries at this 
time. It was while driving the 
monastery horse over the rail 
tracks of North Woods that it hap- 
pened. Not to see the wood for 
the trees is one handicap but this 
was a matter of not seeing the 
oncoming car for the side-board of 



his chaise. It was to cost himi 
three months in the hospital and ai 
forget-me-not in the way of ai 
bouncing gait. 

It was now 1923 and in 1923— 
as most will easily remember — the 
new Retreat in Des Moines was 
opened. Brother Luke was there 
for the occasion, stuffing mattresses 
in anticipation of the arrival of 
the students. When these did come, 
they faced the same problem as 
the ancient Mariner — "water ev- 
erywhere and not a drop to drink." 
Rains had flooded the basement for 
a while and some oversight left 
them without a drinking supply. 
But in their patience all managed 
to possess their souls and see better 
days and years. Ten of these en- 
suing years were seen by Bro. 
Luke, the longest of his many sta- 
tions, before he was sent again to 
Kansas. After a six months' inter- 
lude, Brother came to Louisville 
where he continues "de familia." 

EPILOGUE 

In God's religious army, no ser- 
vice stripes dot the sleeves of the 
veterans ; nevertheless the number 
of their days and years are not 
unknown to God nor shall they pass 
unheeded. The Christ Who could 
say "I am in the midst of you as 
he that serves" is also the just 
Judge Who keeps a crown of life 
for those who fight the good fight 
to the finish. When our venerable 



344 



jubilarian will have done with the 
many duties that mark him for the 
twin-born brother of St. Joseph, 
bearing the burdens of the holy 
family, then Our Lady and her 
divine Son will not be indifferent. 



The House of Gold will receive 
him into everlasting dwellings 
where, to quote a well-known Pas- 
sionist, "jubilees do not go in 
cycles but continue in unending 
years." 



<2i. Qokn <Bajitl.t, C.<P. 




O Lady of the Passion, dost thou weep? 

What help can we then through our tears survey, 
If such as thou a cause for wailing keep? 

What help, what hope, for us, sweet Lady, say? 
"Good man, it doth befit thine heart to lay 
More courage next it, having seen me so. 
All other hearts find other balm today — 

The whole world's consolation is my woe." 

Elizabeth Barret Browning 



:nr> 



Dum volvitur orbis. 



CUP PRIDE AND JCY 



THOSE of us who were born in 
■ the declining years of the nine- 
teenth century have witnessed 
many changes. Our home life was 
simple and peaceful. Any change 
in the home, the parish and the 
neighborhood was an event. The 
child of today has no conception 
of that simplicity and peacefulness. 

The automobile has extended the, 
interests of the family beyond 
state lines. The radio brings in- 
teresting events of the entire world 
into the home. By comparison, the 
youths of today are cosmopolitans. 
The GFs have visited foreign lands, 
the teen-agers have taken auto, 
train and plane trips across the 
nation. Their perspective has been 
broadened — travel accomplishes 
that even for the student with a 
low IQ. 

Not only is modern life more 
complex, but simplicity has ceased 
to be a mental virtue. The sim- 
plicity of our parents is now smiled 
upon by the sophisticated and vir- 
tuous modern — it is actually ridi- 
culed by the shallow minded. The 
peacefulness of our home life is 
now the quiet of boredom in the 
home of today. Music, comedy, 
drama, thrillers, educational talks, 
politics and religion are available 
by radio. The taste of all, from 
the cultured down to moron is sat- 

346 



isfied by the turn of the dial. 

The sensible and virtuous prof 
from this wonderful invention. Th 
shallow minded become more so b 
spreading their minds over hal 
truths and even radical errors. Th 
immoral or amoral became more s 
by glutting their animal instinct 
with nerve-tingling jazz, rape, mui 
der and every type of criminal hi 
tory. Even on the most isolate 
farm simplicity and peacefulnes 
have become out-moded virtues 



Thirty-five years ago, when ou 
pastor announced that a missio 
had been scheduled for the parisi 
the audience broke into an antic: 
patory smile. It was to be an ir 
teresting and profitable event fo 
every member of the family, th 
parish and the neighborhood. Mor 
than ten thousand souls assisted a 
the nine Masses in that parisi 
every Sunday. I doubt if more tha 
a dozen members of that parisi 
had had the privilege of hearin 
our national orator, Mr. Williar 
Jennings Bryan. In their simpl 
faith, the only great orators wer 
the Catholic missionaries. Thes % 
priests were the widely travele i 
men of the Church. They woul | 
preach learned, eloquent and intei 
esting sermons, sermons illustrate 
from their travel-broadened minds 
Holy souls would not surprise, no 



revolting sinners shock them. They 
knew human nature as no other 
man could learn it. What profes- 
sional men knew the secrets of the 
human heart as they, with their 
nany hours in the confessional in 
2very type of parish and neigh- 
borhood ? 

For weeks, in the home, at work, 
in the stores, on the street, all 
>ver the neighborhood we heard 
;alk of the coming missionaries. 
The name, missionary, was synony- 
nous with the words holiness, ora- 
;ory, learning, experience, travel 
ind understanding. 

We shared our enthusiasm with 
Protestant or non-Catholic friends. 
[ proudly watched one such friend's 
tactions when listening to one of 
;he sermons. When leaving the 
Dhurch, with the spell of the great 
)reacher still in my soul, mind, 
ind the very marrow of my bones, 
! felt Jim understood now why I 
vas so proud of my faith. Later 
le would understand why I left 
lome and friends to spend many 
rears preparing to enter the ranks 
)f such glorious men. 

Yes, I'm still a Catholic youth 
n my admiration of those priestly 
giants of the past generation. 
Those old apostles of Christ were 
•ed-blooded, two-fisted, courageous 
ighters of sin and error. A zeal 
)eyond the control of human re- 
straint burnt some of them out in 
he prime of an average life span ; 
ust human shells in the scrap heap 



of discarded humanity. Have they 
quit? Has ill health conquered 
their spirit? Not one of them, to 
my knowledge. Once a missionary 
always one, in mind and soul. Ill 
health has silenced them but they 
continue to feed their zeal with the 
fuel of prayer and silent suffering 
of mind, soul and body — they are 
retired to the contemplative life 
with the happy memories of vic- 
torious fighters. 

In their cloistered lives they are 
still conducting missions and re- 
treats by proxy — working through 
the healthy bodies, vigorous voices 
and spiritual souls of the younger 
generation through advice, encour- 
agement and prayerful assistance. 
A spiritual fraternity stronger 
than the blood relationship of fa- 
ther and son enables them to bask 
in the reflected glory of the present 
mission band. 

In action they vocalized the 
truths of Christ and hurled them 
down the air waves of Divine Grace 
into the souls of the saints, the 
tepid and the lowly sinners. They 
worked without fear of defeat be- 
cause the tremendous spiritual 
wealth of the Province was back- 
ing them. What class of men ever 
showed greater affection for our 
brothers, students, novices and the 
sick of the Province? They had 
every reason to love and esteem 
them for their zeal made them 
justly share their remarkable suc- 
cess on the platform and in the 



347 



confessional with the contempla- 
tives of our glorious Congregation. 

"By their fruits you shall know 
them" — cause and effect. We do 
not need a Hall of Fame to im- 
mortalize those great pioneers. 
They are enshrined in the altar of 
every Passionist's heart. The few 
who have left for eternity live a 
beautiful memory life in our choirs 
(through suffrages), classrooms 
and recreation rooms. Yes, in the 
memories of many Pastors, Sisters 
and the laity. The demands for 
Passionist Missions and Retreats 
often exceed the supply of mis- 
sionaries — a spiritual tribute to 
success. 

When listening to the glowing 
reports of the success of the pres- 
ent mission band I feel that the 
great High Priest, our Man of 
Sorrows, and His Sorrowful Moth- 
er are repaying the old mission- 
aries by perpetuating their great- 
ness in our talented young men. 
"Few but good" was an adage of 
St. Paul of the Cross. Quality 
over numbers is still our standard 
and yes, attainment. 

Why do the older missionaries 
take pride in the younger, whose 
styles and delivery are in equal 
contrast to the ages of the two? 
The older men realize that the 
American student is raised in com- 
petitive sports. He enjoys close 
games. The competition of a rap- 
idly changing world is a challenge 
that he is keen to meet. His in- 

348 



tense application to study preparesi 
his mind, his cloistered life withj 
Jesus and Mary casts out fear — 
fear of competition but not filiali 
fear. "Fear of God is the begin- 
ning of wisdom" — fear of the com- 
petitive world would be an insult 
to the spirituality of our Congre- 
gation. It would be a lack of con-i 
fidence in the Just, Omnipotent andi 
Loving God. He does and should 
fear himself, lest the glamorous 
attractions of the world and the 
well-meant flattery of his auditors 
lessen his consciousness of the dig- 
nity and responsibility of preach- 
ing Christ Crucified. 

The old missionary is not appre- 
hensive of the young. He knows 
that the Eternal Truths, the Sa-i 
cred Passion are sermons which 
always have and always will appeal 
to both mind and heart. Yes, wd 
have always had a few (I presume 
we always will have them), who 
have deviated from the Directori- 
um by stooping to a breezy style 
and novel subjects, but the Catho- 
lic audience condemns them fori 
what they are — insincere and un-i 
spiritual men. They play the grands 
stands and still fail to acquire the 
popularity they seek. They get a 
few laughs that are carried awayj 
on the air waves, but the wise 
cracking Passionist has unfrockedl 
his soul to his congregation. Hisl 
sincere and conscientious compann 
ion receives the plaudits of the 1 
congregation because he bears the 



burden of the confessions. What 
soul wishes to bare his spiritual 
wounds to an amateur comedian? 
How incongruous to attempt the 
part of a light-headed and worldly 
hearted entertainer whilst robed in 
the holy habit of mourning for a 
Crucified Savior? With an eye to 
percentages, the old missionary 
knows that every Order has one or 
two of that repelling type. When 
standing before the bar of his own 
Passionist conscience, such a mis- 
sionary cannot boast legitimately, 
as did the Apostle St. Paul to the 
Corinthian converts: "We at least 
are not as many others adulterat- 
ing the word of God, but with 
sincerity as coming from God, we 
preach Christ in God's presence" 
(2 Cor. 2:17). 

Again you ask, why do the old 
missionaries have such unshakeable 
confidence in the young? He knows 
the young man is a product of his 
age — he knows his own. He as- 
cends the platform exuding confi- 
dence, because he cannot fail due 
to the Passionist method, which 
does not have a close competitor 
even in the Church of Christ Cru- 
cified. His style and delivery must 
pe adapted to his changing con- 
gregation. The style and delivery 
of the renowned Catholic orators 
of the eighteenth century would 
not have been effective in the nine- 
teenth century congregation. Nat- 
ional life, thought and taste are 
as different as the two generations. 



Since nineteen hundred and forty 
about half of our population has 
changed living quarters. Some 
twelve million people moved to a 
different state; thirteen million 
stayed in the same state but moved 
to a different county, and forty- 
four million moved within the same 
county. Yes, change is the order 
of this generation and an evidence 
of national restlessness and econ- 
omic luxury. 

The changed perspective of the 
modern auditor is due to many 
external and educational influences, 
but one change they possess was 
totally absent from the pre-radio 
audience — a critical and censorious 
mind. Some unjustly confuse their 
critical minds with weak Catholic 
faith. I use the word unjustly ad- 
visedly, because when you have 
heard the nation's best speakers 
you naturally make comparisons, 
even when possessed with the faith 
of a Saint. 

In our youthful efforts we were 
accepted as orators, learned men, 
understanding priests and fervent 
religious by the simple pre-radio 
Catholics. "This man was instruct- 
ed in the way of the Lord, and 
being fervent in spirit, spoke and 
taught diligently the things that 
are of Jesus" (Acts 18:25). 

The young missionary is not so 
privileged. His auditors have heard 
Father Charles Coughlin and his 
oratory still echoes and re-echoes 



349 



in the unfailing memory of all ca- 
pable of appreciating his marvelous 
gifts. His auditors have heard the 
learned discourses of Msgr. Fulton 
Sheen. Why continue to enumerate 
the advantages of the modern con- 
gregation when turning the dial 
brings to them the best, or at least 
better than average speakers of 
the nation? 

Do most of our older mission- 
aries feel apprehensive about our 
young priests in the field of such 
oratorical competition? Not the 
least. The oratorical Father Charles 
Coughlin and the learned Msgr. 
Fulton Sheen are but voices to 
many, if not most, of their enthu- 
siastic followers. The black robed, 
sandaled Passionist standing next 
to his Crucified Savior is photo- 
graphed on the memory of his con- 
gregation. They will see as well 
as hear a sermon. He is the per- 
sonification of his sermon. The 
Eternal Truths and the Sacred 
Passion, in themselves, have had 
and always will have a stronger 
persuasive power on the Catholic 
mind than the subject matter of 
any and all eminent speakers. 

Personal holiness may be lacking 
in a few but the spirituality radi- 
ating from the Holy Habit and 
that supplied by the contemplatives 
wearing that same habit, will sup^ 
ply that deficiency. That unfor- 
tunate missionary is accomplishing 
great good, merely through the fine 
impression made by the Holy 



Habit, indelibly impressed on the 
minds of his auditors. May God 
have mercy on his tepid soul. 

The young Passionist learns very 
early in life that he must not in 
justice personalize his success. The 
sudden transition from the un- 
known and cloistered simplex priest 
to a lionized public speaker in 
great demand bewilders him. He 
returns to his monastery and is 
again transformed into just anoth- 
er religious amongst his own. These 
recurrent transitions from the con- 
templative oblivion and silence of 
the monastery cloister into the 
noise, adulation and flattery of an 
active apostolate are thought pro- 
voking to say the least. He knows 
now why oblivion is the normal 
state of almost all ex-Passionist 
missionaries. Worldliness, sense- 
less vanity and neglect of medita- 
tion and the choir are some of the 
reasons why a small percentage of 
our men have exchanged the at- 
tractive habit for a cassock. God 
in His mercy shrouds such in ob- 
livion to win back their once fer- 
vent and zealous souls. 

Fear, due to the international, 
national, domestic and religious 
condition, is in the air we breathe 
and the propaganda we read. The 
old missionaries are conscious of 
the religious vitality of our Prov- 
ince, and hence are not alarmists. 
Their confidence is with the young 
and not with the recurrent reform- 
ers who have been fearing for the I 



350 



young through the changing cen- 
turies of the Church. The vigor of 
our spiritual vitality in America 
has been evidenced in our actions 
and our accomplishments, and not 
the soft-spoken word or pious de- 
meanor of the old legendary monk. 

When the Province abandons the 
choir, study and cheerful communi- 
ty life — when it comes down from 
Calvary to enjoy the world and 
satisfy the flesh, the older mission- 
ary will be the first to condemn 
himself and the young. Such a 
generation of so-called Passionists, 
even after preaching to others, will 
justly be divine castaways. 

Our knowledge of the splendid 
virility of so many Passionists en- 
ables us to esteem and love the 



old, and to repose a confidence de- 
void of fear in the young. It is 
not the complacency of a successful 
business man, but rather spiritual 
gratitude for God's continued bless- 
ings, manifested in the quality of 
our vocations. 

St. Paul of the Cross preferred 
to lose a monastery before a mis- 
sionary — who wouldn't? We speak 
and act with due reverence and 
obedience to all our superiors— we 
respect their type of work for our 
Congregation. But in the depths 
of our soul we esteem the Passion- 
ist on the platform and at the 
conference table as the Passionist 
without equal. Legitimate pride in 
our old man and an effervescent 
joy in the young. 



<?t. SuLv^Ui, d.<P. 



Who looks with love upon the flower 
Will contemplate the root; 

Nor can he well forget the tree 
Who relishes the fruit. 



351 



Walk worthy of your Vocation! 



A PASSIONIST IN 

THE MTS<>rieAI> RODT 



THE beautiful doctrine of the 
Mystical Body of Christ reaches 
into our everyday life with its rich 
implications and its tremendous 
consequences. By Baptism we are 
incorporated into the Mystical Body 
and Life of Christ. Henceforth the 
least of our actions takes on a tre- 
mendous value. For we, guided by 
the Holy Spirit, are writing out, — 
or perhaps I should say "living out" 
— the story of the life of Christ, 
in this 20th century. The story 
of our Head is written in the Gos- 
pels. But He continues to live in 
His members, — and this part of 
His life is being worked out in 
our daily lives. 

And we write our part well, or 
mar it up, according as we do or 
do not allow ourselves to be guided 
by the Holy Spirit, — just as Christ 
did all things well, by being guided 
by the Holy Spirit in all things. 

Since the life of the church is 
simply the extension of the life of 
Christ, it is of course modeled, — 
patterned, — upon the life of its 
Head. His life was one of prayer, 
of toil, of obedience, of poverty 
and suffering, a life of charity, 
caring for the sick and suffering, 
ministering to the care of souls. 
Such then is the life of the church, 

352 



lived by us His members. It is not 
that His life, in its entirety, is 
reproduced in each one of us. As 
a model, He is far too rich in His 
example to be fully reproduced by 
any individual member. He is the 
perfect exemplification of every vir- 
tue, of every phase of Christian 
life. To the individual member, it 
is given to reproduce one particular 
aspect, to bring into special em- 
phasis one particular virtue of 
Christ. As a prism reveals all the) 
colors of the spectrum contained in 
sunlight, so God's saints and His 
followers through the centuries un 
fold the inexhaustible perfections 
of our Model. 

As Christians, we try to imitate 
all the virtues of Christ. But each 
one of us, by reason of our voca-i 
tion, is called upon to emphasize 
some particular virtue or aspect of 
Christ's life. 

St. Francis of Assisi, for exam* 
pie, was chosen by God to imitate 
His poverty. And the followers of 
the Poverello, to this day, keep 
before the eyes of the world the 
poverty of Christ. The Domini- 
cans, the Order of Preachers, con-| 
tinues, in this 20th century, the 
preaching of the life of Christ 
Through orders of Brothers anc 



Hospital Sisters we see Christ daily 
ministering to the sick, the suffer- 
ing, the dying. Each phase of His 
life is being constantly reproduced 
by His members. His teaching life 
by the teaching Brothers and Sis- 
ters, His prayer life by the Bene- 
dictines, His devotion to His Moth- 
er, by those orders especially dedi- 
cated to Mary. The years of His 
hidden life, His years of labor and 
toil are being reproduced by peo- 
ple of every walk of life, by your 
Father and my Father and our 
brothers and sisters and others who 
are leading good Christian lives 
for the love and glory of God. Only 
in eternity will men know the beau- 
ty and the value of their hidden 
lives ! 

Naturally then the question pre- 
sents itself: What is our vocation 
as Passionists? The answer is so 
clear that there cannot possibly be 
any mistake. We are called to 
preach the Passion and Death of 
Christ! To keep constantly before 
the eyes of the world Christ and 
Him Crucified! We are to do this, 
not only by our preaching, but by 
the life that we live, by the Rule 
that we follow, by the very garb 
that we wear! 

It is no wonder then, that His 
Holiness, Pope Benedict XIV, when 
he placed the seal of the Church's 
approval on the Passionists, said : 
"This congregation of the Passion 
is the last to come into the church ; 
it should have been the first!" 



For what is there in the whole 
life of Christ more appealing than 
His Passion and Death ! Is it not 
the one thing, which more than all 
else in His life, draws men to 
Christ? His Passion and Death is 
the overwhelming proof of His tre- 
mendous love for us! It is the 
most compelling motive to bring 
sinners back to Christ. The great- 
est inspiration to holiness of life. 
For all sanctity and holiness takes 
its beginning and its increase from 
the sacred Passion of our Savior! 

Jesus, in preaching His last 
great sermon, from the pulpit of 
the cross, sums up all the virtues, 
all the lessons of His life. Never 
before had He preached humility 
and poverty with such eloquence, 
as when He was dying naked, — a 
criminal's death, — on the cross of 
shame. What sublime lessons of 
obedience, of patience, of forgive- 
ness does He not offer us in His 
Sacred Passion. Never before had 
He preached with greater tender- 
ness of the Mercy of God. But 
above all else, the sermon Christ 
preaches from the Cross, is the 
sermon of Divine Love! — a sermon 
preached in the strongest language 
of the human heart, the language 
of suffering. Men might have been 
foolish enough to rebel against 
God's justice. They might have 
doubted His mercy. But no one 
could look upon Christ Crucified 
and resist His tremendous love for 
them! 



353 



And to think, my brethren, that 
unworthy though we are, we Pas- 
sionists have been chosen by God 
to preach Christ Crucified to the 
world f It is our special mission in 
the church, — entrusted to us by 
Christ and His Sorrowful Mother. 
With the greatest reverence then 
and the deepest humility, might we 
ask ourselves : What vocation more 
sublime could God entrust to men? 

To us has been entrusted the 
most effective message for bring- 
ing sinners back to God, the mes- 
sage that can bring peace and joy 
to the sorrowful and the suffering, 
— the message that can lead to the 
heights of holiness, souls who seek 
to follow Christ! 

To be entrusted with so weighty 
a message is a singular privilege. 
But it also carries its responsibili- 
ties. It would be a sad thing, if a 
Passionist were to fail to preach 
Christ Crucified. Or if he himself 
did not understand the lessons of 
the Cross and could not pass them 
on to others! 

Indeed, this is the first and the 
chief obligation which our vocation 
implies. We must grasp well the 
lessons of the Passion and incor- 
porate into our own lives the vir- 
tues of Christ Crucified! 

The call to our congregation is 
an invitation from Christ to share 
intimately in His sacred Passion. 
It is an invitation to take our place 
with Him in the Garden of Olives, 



before the judgment seats of the 
world, and along the way of the 
Cross. That Christ should give 
such an invitation to anyone, indi- 
cates a very special love for such 
a soul. A love akin to that special 
love He had for Peter, James and 
John, whom He invited to enter 
into the Garden to share His sor- 
rows and comfort Him in His 
agony. 

But it is an invitation to a life 
of self-contempt, of perfect obedi- 
ence, of complete detachment. He 
invites us to compassionate His 
sufferings, to share His hatred of. 
sin, His zeal for reparation, His 
thirst for souls. 

To accept such an invitation 
would clearly indicate a great, 
strong, personal love for Christ. 
It would indicate at least a desire 
to practice great virtue. And a 
willingness to suffer much for 
Christ, — an almost reckless indif- 
ference to pleasures and comforts, 
to mortification, sacrifice and pen- 
ance. It would manifest an eager- 
ness to be united with Christ in 
His Passion, — a desire to offer up 
our bodies, our whole selves (espe- 
cially at Holy Mass,) that through 
us, Christ may make up for those 
sufferings which are wanting in 
His members. To accept such an 
invitation calls for courage. To 
persevere in such a vocation calls 
for great courage. 

When our Holy Father, Paul of 



354 



the Cross, founded the Passionist 
Order, he was aspiring to the high- 
est ideals for himself and his fol- 
lowers. Learned men, saintly men, 
even the highest authorities of the 
church, hesitated to approve this 
new mode of life. They said it was 
almost impossible for ordinary men 
to live up to such heroic ideals 
over a long period of years. But 
Paul of the Cross had fallen so 
deeply in love with Christ Crucified 
and had come to such a realization 
of His sufferings, that he could not 
see why other men, — not all men, 
but just some special few, — should 
not be found, ready to live only 
for the Crucified. He envisioned 
a community of men, every one 
of whom was striving for the most 
heroic sanctity, — men of prayer, 
of penance, of complete detach- 
ment. Men whose hearts were over- 
flowing with love and zeal for 
Christ Crucified. 

In a world that was growing 
soft, Paul of the Cross did not 
hesitate to revive the penitential 
practices of the early church, — 
fasting, discipline, public penance, 
hard beds, sleeping in the habit, 
rising in the middle of the night 
for prayer, etc. He prescribed soli- 
tude, silence, long hours of medita- 
tion and a spirit of prayer, equal 
to or surpassing that of the most 
contemplative orders of the church. 
At the same time his followers 
were to be apostolic men, who go 
about the country, preaching elo- 



quently the love of Christ Crucified, 
spending long hours in the confes- 
sional, tirelessly administering the 
sacraments, everywhere stirring up 
the faith of men and drawing souls 
to Christ. 

And so we have in our Passion- 
ist life a combination of the very 
highest form of the contemplative 
life, the penitential life, and at the 
same time the most intense form 
of apostolic activity. 

Men might indeed question our 
ambition to live such a life. But 
when we look at it in the light of 
the Mystical Body, we can see how 
appropriate it all is. Every Chris- 
tian can say with St. Paul : I live, 
now not I, but Christ liveth in me. 
For us Passionists, it is always 
Christ Crucified living in us. Christ 
has chosen us, that He might in 
this 20th century, through us, com- 
plete that which is wanting to His 
Passion in His members. And as 
far as we Passionists are con- 
cerned, the Mystical Body reaches 
its completion when we live up to 
the expectations of our Holy Rule. 
There each one of us is given his 
part to play in today's sacred 
drama of the Passion, — superior 
and lector, director and students, 
brothers and priests. It matters 
not what part is given us to play. 
What does count, is that we do 
our part well! 

Truly, ours is a singular voca- 
tion. We can see this especially 



355 



when we look at it in the light of 
the doctrine of the Mystical Body. 
The realization of what it means 
should awaken in us a deep sense 
of gratitude to God for having 
called us to this most sublime vo- 
cation in His Church. And then it 
should awaken in us a spirit of 
generosity, — especially when things 
seem a little hard. When we do 



not feel like getting up for Matins, 
or sleeping in the habit or taking 
the discipline. When poverty be- 
gins to pinch, when community life 
seems irksome, when obedience ties 
our hands. Then let us say: Now 
indeed do I begin to be a Pas- 
sionist! Now I begin to feel the 
cross of Christ. Gladly will I carry 
it for love of Him! 



Di. S. 



zn%\ 



a<p. 




Simplicity sang Magnificat, 

Pomposity scandal took thereat. 

"Maid, wouldst thou thus of thy pride make Ree?' 

"But yea" quoth our Lady "mighty is He. 

Mighty, indeed, who can magnify ME!" 



356 



iJueditations on the <SoWows ofcJna>iy 



THE THIRD SORROW 
THE THREE DAYS' LOSS 



A GAIN it was the time when 
|^ the solemn days of the Pasch 
were to be celebrated. This was 
one of the three festivals of the 
year when every man of the Jews 
in the homeland had to go to Jeru- 
salem, if possible, so that, by pub- 
licly worshipping God in the Tem- 
ple, he would proclaim to all the 
world that he was of God's chosen 
people. Holy Joseph would have 
done so regularly and, from time 
to time at least, Mary would have 
accompanied him. 

It is a question whether or not 
the Divine Child ever went to the 
festivals before this year. Arche- 
laus had succeeded Herod, his 
bloodthirsty father, upon the 
throne and had also followed his 
atrocious conduct. At one Pass- 
over he had caused the massacre 
of three thousand Jews. Most 
likely, Mary and Joseph would have 
been reluctant to bring Jesus with- 
in this tyrant's reach, even though 
they could have reasonably trusted 
■to being lost in the vast crowds at 
the festivals. Recently, however, 
Archelaus had been deposed and 
exiled on account of his tyranny. 
This year, therefore, with Arche- 
laus no longer ruling in Jerusalem, 
Jesus went up to the feast. 

This year would be different 



from all the years before and from 
all the years to come. It was the 
twelfth year of The Child. This 
year He had become legally an 
adult. Henceforth He would be 
considered a man, in regard to the 
obligations of the Law, which He 
would now have to sedulously ob- 
serve. 

Mary recalled all this in the 
midst of their simple preparations 
for the pilgrimage. From now on, 
the Child would be less under her 
immediate direction and more un- 
der that of her holy spouse. She 
felt like a mother taking her child 
to school for the first time ; — from 
this on out she ceases to be "all" 
in her little one's life. More and 
more that life will take up other 
interests until "mother" becomes 
the last of them ; whereas, hither- 
to, she has been all of them. 

Surely, Mary must have felt 
these stirrings of mother-love ; yet 
she would have gone on to reflect 
that the usual course of Divine 
Providence was her guide until 
other ways were unmistakably 
made known by the Divine Will. 

We know that they mack' the 
journey with neighbors and rela- 
tives, banding together with them 
for company and protection, thus 



357 



giving each other the support of 
good example in fulfilling the re- 
quirements of the Law. Midway 
to Jerusalem their route converged 
with that from the shores of the 
Sea of Galilee. They may well have 
been joined by the families of Zeb- 
edee of Bethsaida and Cleophas 
from Capharnum whose wives were 
sisters, the one of Mary and the 
other of Joseph. With their vig- 
orous young sons, who were later 
to become Apostles and Martyrs of 
Christ, they no doubt made pleas- 
ant companions for the Holy 
Family. 

The pilgrims would have often 
recalled the purpose of their jour- 
ney — the feast they were going to 
celebrate commemorated the deliv- 
erance of their ancestors from 
Egypt; that by this festival the 
memory of that event was kept 
alive. They would have pointed out 
places of interest in their coun- 
try's history, relating incidents 
connected with them. Scenes of 
beauty and grandeur which abound 
in a mountainous country would 
have been enjoyed. At any rate 
they made their way to the Holy 
City, a devout and prayerful com- 
pany of pilgrims. Each evening 
they would camp together, moving 
on in the morning sunshine until 
they gained their first sight of the 
City and the Temple — a moment 
of unequalled thrill for every child 
of Israel. 

The excitement of arrival over, 

358 



they sought a place to abide during 
their stay. Mary had spent several 
years in the Temple and would 
have had friends, perhaps relatives 
in the city. Did she seek them out 
now? Or did she, remembering 
the scant courtesy of an overcrowd- 
ed city on the night of her Child's 
birth, decide to rely upon their own 
resources? Besides, she and Jo- 
seph knew full well that the Paschal 
lamb was a type and figure that 
was to be fulfilled by her own 
Divine Son. To them the Paschal 
solemnity had a much fuller mean- 
ing than to anyone else. They may 
then have, all the more, preferred 
to remain lost in the crowd and 
to camp with their sturdy Galilean 
neighbors, as being thus more se- 
cure and protected during the con- 
fusion of the celebrations. 

With their place of abode de- 
cided upon, it remained for them 
to arrange with whom they Would 
join to eat the Paschal supper, for 
they were only three, and small 
families were to unite with others 
so as to make a group large enough 
to dispose of the Paschal lamb, 
nothing of which was to remain. 

As the head of the family, holy 
Joseph would have gone to the 
temple market and purchased a 
lamb, had it offered by the priests 
and then slain. After its blood had 
been ritually offered and disposed 
of, the lamb would have been car- 
ried home and roasted for the 
coming feast, wherein every re- 



quirement of the liturgy had to 
be strictly observed. 

When the devout pilgrims had 
held their feast they were at liberty 
to return to their homes. It is not 
unlikely, however, that the Holy 
Family remained a few days in 
the city, resting from their jour- 
ney, in which case they would have 
been sure to go to the Temple for 
public prayers and devotions. This 
was the logical thing to do, seeing 
that each man of the Jews had 
made the national pilgrimage in 
order to publicly proclaim that he 
was one of God's own people. When 
duty and piety had been satisfied, 
the journey homeward began. 

All plans had been previously 
made as to when the company 
would start, and what route they 
would take away from the city, 
overflowing as it was with visitors 
from throughout the world. Their 
stopping places had also been a- 
greed upon. As they got farther 
from the city their minds would 
have been invigorated by the fresh- 
ness of the country, while its open- 
ness and beauty would have re- 
joiced their hearts. 

It was usual for the men and 
women to move along in separate 
groups. Older boys traveled with 
the men who were relatives or 
neighbors, probably passing from 
group to group and indulging in 
all the spirited exuberance of their 
years. Fathers and mothers would 
have no particular anxiety about 



their younger teen-aged boys who 
traveled as they pleased with either 
group. If either of the parents 
failed to notice them along the 
way, they would think them to be 
with the other. Upon reaching the 
place of the night's rest, families 
reassembled for reasons of order 
and of safety. 

In this way the holy pair came 
to the end of the first day's jour- 
ney. As they met the question 
rose to the lips of each, "Where is 
He"? Neither could say. A few 
inquiries showed that He was not 
among their relatives and it soon 
appeared that He had not been 
with any of the groups of their 
friends along the way. Wonder 
filled their minds that it should be. 
What new mystery was this for 
which they had not been prepared? 
Where had He gone? To abide 
with others? Back to heaven? But 
what of His mission to redeem 
men? 

Wonder soon gave way to fear. 
Could He have lost His way? Had 
He met with some accident along 
the rough and dangerous mountain 
road? Or had He been carried off 
in the fulfillment of some deep mys- 
tery, as had the Patriarch, Joseph, 
of old? They knew that the Divine 
Attributes were veiled and held in 
check; that He used only the abili- 
ties of His human years. 

Poor parents! We can imagine 
holy Joseph whispering with tears. 
"The Treasure of Heaven! Have 



359 



we lost Him?" And Mary's trem- 
bling voice saying, "My Child! 
What has happened to Him ? Where 
is He?" 

There was only one thing to do 
— go back along the way looking 
for Him, even to the city itself. 

Poor Mother! Bravely she 
walked along, supported by the arm 
of her holy spouse while her holy 
heart felt to the full the sharpness 
of the sword of sorrow which split 
it wide open with fear. 

For the first time she had lost 
personal contact with Jesus ! For 
twelve years she had been with 
Him daily — hearing Him speak, 
meeting His eyes, seeing Him 
smile. Now He is gone! Would 
He never speak to her again? Had 
she lost His smile, His presence 
forever? Where was He now? 

When Simeon had foretold that 
her Child was a sign to be con- 
tradicted she could tightly fold 
Him to her heart and offer Him 
the protection of her love. As she 
fled with Him into Egypt she could 
offer Him the solace of her mother- 
love in His exile. But now He 
was in, she knew not what danger, 
and she was not there to share it 
with Him. How completely her 
heart was broken by the loss of 
her Child, her Jesus, her God! Her 
feet seemed made of lead as she 
hastened to find Him. 

An angel had sent her into Egypt 
when men had sought His life. An 
angel had directed her to return 



to her homeland and to settle in 
Nazareth. Oh! Where are the an- 
gels now, when her tender Son 
is lost? 

She had so dutifully taken Him 
to the Temple to worship God, IJis, 
Eternal Father, in fulfillment of 
the Law. Now He was lost; gone! 
gone! She was left desolate — and 
without having been told! 

Yet, hers was not^a lonely, selfish 
grief. Another heart was breaking 
at her side, another heart beloved 
of God almost as was her own. 
The heavy step; the brimming 
eyes, the tear-choked voice, — all 
told her of the anguish in the soul 
of her holy spouse. It added to 
her own most painful grief; the 
more so as she knew he suffered 
too, because he understood her woe. 

The search continued. They re- 
called the more dangerous places 
of the road and hurrying there 
scanned them fearfully, while call- 
ing His name again and again. By 
morning they were at their old 
camp-site, near the city, but no 
matter what inquiries were made, 
no sign of Him was found. With 
the earliest pilgrims they entered 
the city and, going from house to 
house of friends and relatives, 
spent the day in search of Him. 
They found Him not. Sheltered 
that night by sympathetic friends, 
they slept from weariness and 
grief. 

Next morning, with heavy foot- 
steps and heavier hearts, they a- 



360 



-ain took up the search. As it 
oore no fruit, they made their way 
to the Temple, hoping that there 
God would be pleased to send them 
some aid. Stopping at some point 
of vantage, they gazed with anx- 
ious sorrow over the crowds, won- 
dering could they possibly locate 
Him in all that throng. 

Not far away a particular con- 
course of people gathered near the 
door of one of the halls. Within 
sat the Doctors of the Law to an- 
swer questions and settle difficul- 
ties of all who came to them. Some- 
thing of special interest was going 
on. Perhaps the Child had made 
His way there. Hopefully they 
went to see. Someone was heard 
to say, "For three days now, this 
wonder has gone on. It must be 
Daniel or an angel, for such wis- 
dom from the lips of a child is not 
of earth." "It is Jesus!" exclaimed 
holy Joseph. "It is my Son," cried 
Mary. The crowd parted, allowing 
them to approach the chairs of the 
Doctors. Oh! Joy of joys! Jesus 
was there! 

Sitting on a low stool, His hand 
resting on a scroll outspread upon 
an aged Doctor's knee, He was 
asking questions which amazed the 
entire school of ancients. His an- 
swers to their queries also filled 
them with astonishment. 

As He noticed the approach of 
His Mother and Joseph, He arose 
and went to them to be folded in 
their arms and feel their tears of 



joy upon His forehead. Leading 
Him gently away, His Mother 
asked, "Son, why hast thou done 
so to us? Behold, thy father and 
I have sought Thee, sorrowing." 
"How did you seek me," He asked. 
"Did you not know that I must be 
about my Father's business?" 

His Father's business. He must 
be about His Father's business. 
They did not understand just what 
He meant, but they knew that they 
would never forget what He had 
said. His Father's business! They 
knew most surely why He had 
come into the world. They knew 
the things that would naturally be 
foremost in His desires and ambi- 
tions. Like any little boy, He had 
run away, being anxious to begin 
the work he longed to do — to teach 
the presence and the purpose of 
the Messiah upon earth. 

He must be about His Father's 
business! The time would surely 
come when He would leave all, 
including home and loved ones, to 
go about the work for which He 
had been born. The mystery was 
great. They could not understand 
it. But now He was theirs once 
more; quietly coming with them 
as they made their way along. 
Once more their God was making 
Himself their obedient child and in 
His heavenly presence the great 
sorrow of His loss was healed. 

* -X- -X- -X- -X- 

Oh, my soul! Think well upon 
this mystery of Our Blessed Moth- 



361 



er's Sorrow. Learn that you are 
always under the care and domin- 
ion of our loving God. Trials will 
come, we know not when, but no 
life is exempt from them. They 
sought out even Mary and her holy 
spouse. When trials do come, how- 
ever, see that Mary and Joseph 
are your guides in meeting them. 
They went at once in search of 
Jesus. They betook themselves to 
the Holy City and to the Temple, 
from which circumstances it is to 
be learned that the surest help in 
our trials will be found in the 
usages of religion. The Church and 
the Sacraments and holy prayer 



are the grand means appointed b; 
God to help us meet our trials. 

From Mary's grief it may als» 
be learned how dismal is the cas< 
of the soul that has lost its contac 
with God by sin. All the joy an* 
beauty of grace and of the Divin 
Presence are lost and Oh! what 
loss is that! Every effort must b 
made to regain them; and thosi 
efforts must be made at once. 

Turning resolutely back to God 
using His divine appointed means 
will insure our finding once mori 
His blessed grace and the tranquil! 
ty of soul which comes from bein; 
united to Him. 

Ox. ctfgat&o, C<P. 



"Every age shall bless my name," 
Humility cried, and Pride said, "Shame! 
Maiden, what thinkest thou to be?" 
"But nay" quoth our Lady cheerily, 
Holy His name is — never mind me." 



362 



* lie 

Missionary 

FORUM 

• IDEALS 

• TRADITIONS 

• TECHNIQUES 

• LETTERS 

• EXAMPLES 

• SUGGESTIONS 




THEOLOGIANS, spiritual writ- 
1 ers, and retreat masters give 
many good rules and counsels for 
the guidance of confessors in their 
?reat work of salvation with peni- 
tents. One of the best of all those 
rules, a rule that more or less in- 
cudes all the others, is the golden 
rule given by Our Lord Himself: 
'As you would that men should 
io to you, do you also to them in 
ike manner" (Luke 6:31). 



As spiritual judges to sinners in 
the confessional we should give to 
those who kneel before us in that 
tribunal of penance what we ex- 
pect for ourselves when we kneel 
as sinners in confession : justice 
tempered with mercy. As spiritual 
physicians to sick souls we should 
give to our spiritual patients what 
we desire when we bare our own 
sick souls to our spiritual physi- 
cian: kind and careful treatment. 



363 



— FORUM 



As spiritual fathers to wayward 
children we should give to repen- 
tant prodigals what we hope for 
when we go as prodigals in re- 
pentance to our father confessor: 
charitable compassion. In the 
words of Canon Oakley : "No medi- 
tation is so profitable to a confes- 
sor as that which brings before 
him the sense of his own infirmity, 
because none is so apt to secure 
generous and compassionate treat- 
ment of his penitents." 

We too are sinners. We too must 
go to confession. We too must 
plead for mercy and pardon. We 
too have doubts, difficulties, trials, 
troubles, and temptations from 
time to time. To whom do we go 
for helpful advice and hopeful en- 
couragement? Whom do we choose 
when we choose our own confessor? 
Do we go again to a priest, if he 
has no sympathy for us? If he is 
hasty; if he is harsh; if he is 
impatient with us? What would 
hasty, impatient confessors say if 
they got from their own confessors 
the treatment they sometimes give 
to their penitents in the confes- 
sional? Condemning a harsh judge 
who did not temper justice with 
mercy Shakespeare said: "Mercy 
is an attribute to God Himself; 
and earthly power doth show likest 
God's when mercy seasons justice. 
Consider this, that, in the course of 
justice, none of us should see sal- 



vation: we do pray for mercy, and 
that same prayer doth teach us 
all to render the deeds of mercy." 
Warning and advising all priests, 
the Council of Baltimore says: 
"How great and arduous is the 
office of confessor, appears clearly 
from the fact that by it he is made 
the judge in the place of Christ, 
and that of his judgment he must 
render a strict account to the Su- 
preme Judge. To him therefore, 
apply the words with which the 
pious King of Israel charged the 
judged appointed by him: 'Take 
heed what you do; for you exer- 
cise not the judgment of man, but! 
of the Lord God'" (II Par. 19). 
In the same spirit, St. John Chrys- 
ostom says: "If we already trem- 
ble having to render an account 
of our own sins, what awaits him 
who has to render an account of: 
so many souls?" 

We often get much praise for a 
little success in our missionary 
work and preaching; but we sel- 
dom hear what is said about pur 
failures in the confessional. To 
hear what is said about our fail- 
ures there would be far more prof- 
itable for us than to hear the 
praise of our preaching, a praise 
that is generally given by those 
who judge by very superficial 
standards. In The Priest on the 
Mission Canon Oakley says: "It is 
our disadvantage as priests thai 



364 



FORUM 



we are seldom if ever reminded in 
our own case of the effects of a 
repulsive manner in the confes- 
sional." Some years ago, the 
Queen's Work promoted a letter 
writing contest in answer to the 
question : "What person has had 
the greatest influence in your life?" 
One of the letters published was 
from a Catholic, who declared that : 
"My confessor has influenced me 
more than anyone else. . . . His 
kind efforts and untiring zeal have 
brought me peace and contentment, 
have influenced me to go to Mass 
and Holy Communion daily, have 
encouraged me to undertake cor- 
poral and spiritual works of mer- 
fcy, to meet daily trials and crosses 
theerfully, and to do little things 
faithfully. He has listened, ad- 
/ised, and consoled me week after 
week, no matter how tired he may 
have been, or how many penitents 
he still had to hear that night." 

That same writer also said that 
she had not found all confessors 
helpful, that some of them did not 
seem to realize what a great op- 
portunity they had for good influ- 
ence, that some preach sermons en- 
couraging people to go to confes- 
lion, and then discourage them by 
;elling them to shorten their con- 
cession as much as possible, and 
;hat she had found her good con- 
'essor only after a long search 
?oing from one confessor to an- 



other, meeting with many failures, 
persevering in her prayerful quest, 
and making a special novena to 
Our Blessed Lady for help. That 
letter was reprinted by the Ameri- 
can Ecclesiastical Review. 

It reminds us of what we are 
told by the immortal letters of the 
great St. Theresa. Speaking from 
experience, she revealed that much 
evil had been done to her soul by 
bad confessors, and much good had 
been done for it by good confessors. 

If St. Theresa were still on earth 
and came to our confessional, in 
what class would she put us, — in 
the good or in the bad? If the 
lady who wrote to the Queen's 
Work had come to us in her long 
search for a helpful father-confes- 
sor and spiritual guide, how would 
she have classified us? What would 
she have said about our confes- 
sional manners and spiritual treat- 
ment? If we could see the long 
list of confessors as they are classi- 
fied by God in the Book of Life, 
in what class would we see our 
names listed, — with the bad or with 
the good ? 

We have not yet an answer to 
that question from God. We have 
not a St. Theresa, nor a good hon- 
est critic to give us helpful truth 
rather than harmful flattery; but 
let us hope that we still have 
enough conscience and enough com- 
mon sense to know that we cannot 



365 



FORUM 



be good confessors, if we have bad 
manners in the confessional ; that 
we cannot do good work for God 
and for souls there, if we are 
careless or impatient, or harsh with 
poor sinners who kneel beside us 
in the tribunal of mercy, call us 
Fathers, and expect a fatherly 
compassion. 

To be good confessors doing 
good work for God and for souls 



in the confessional, we must do to 
our penitents what we expect our 
own confessors to do to ourselves. 
We must not only put on the purple 
stole of jurisdiction, but we must 
also clothe ourselves with the mer- 
ciful charity of Christ. By our own 
good example in the confessional 
we must confirm what we preach 
from the pulpit: the Golden Rule 
preached and practiced by Christ. 



<3t. cRzginaU, C. <P. 



A 



I.IESI XPI 
\P\SSII(/ 






366 



In Fide non ficta. 



Jfflore QHjougfjte on draper 



f\ NE of the big difficulties of 
^^ mental prayer is spiritual dry- 
ness or lack of sensible devotion. 
This is one of the most common 
causes of discouragement and the 
reason why some lose interest in 
mental prayer. Though our last 
article touched on this point, it is 
such an important factor in our 
prayer life that it deserves fur- 
ther consideration. 

When a soul first gives itself to 
the spiritual life our Lord usually 
gives it consolations and sweetness. 
He does this for the purpose of 
attracting the soul to Himself and 
to detach it from the attractions 
of the world. But afterwards, when 
He sees it more settled and making 
progress God withdraws sensible 
devotion in order to purify it and 
lead it on to greater holiness. Be- 
fore, there was a great deal of 
self-seeking in that sweetness of 
prayer; now He wants the soul to 
serve Him for His own sake, and 
not merely for the pleasure the 
soul finds in so doing. 

This purification of the soul 
through dryness and aridity is so 
important that one's whole spirit- 
ual life will depend in great part 
upon it. Souls that are strong and 
whom God desires to lead far in 
the spiritual life, He tries by long- 



er and more severe trials. Weak 
souls, whom God does not intend 
to lead so far, will have but short 
trials, frequently interspersed with 
sweetness. If He did not treat them 
in this way they would not per- 
severe. So when God tries us, our 
one desire should be that He would 
not 'be easy' on us, — to use a com- 
mon expression, — but would purify 
our soul without delay and lead us 
on to a great love of Himself. 

These are the thoughts that run 
through many of the letters of 
direction of our Holy Founder. 
"Believe me, your spiritual affairs 
never looked so good as now," he 
wrote to one who had complained 
to him of a lack of sensible devo- 
tion. (L. 111,806) "The state you 
are in at present is none other 
than true poverty and nakedness of 
spirit, which is rich in every good. 
So I beg you to cherish it, and to 
bless the Lord who has placed you 
in this state of darkness, abandon- 
ment, anguish, etc., to reclothe you 
hereafter with exalted gifts and 
inestimable riches." 

During these trials, he constant- 
ly encouraged such souls to a com- 
plete conformity to the Divine Will. 
"Let your joy be the satisfaction 
of the Most High, while you nour- 
ish yourself more and more with 



367 



His most Holy Will . . . Your pres- 
ent state will gradually bring you 
a wealth of graces." (L,II,473) Or 
again, "Remain steadfast in prayer 
without comfort . . . Never com- 
plain . . . Imitate Jesus in His ag- 
ony in the Garden of Olives : He 
uttered no other complaint than 
these words, 'Ah, Father! Sweet 
Father! Fiat voluntas tua! Oh, 
what spiritual riches you will ac- 
quire! Oh, what treasures!" (L, 
11,738) 

This, of course, is a common 
teaching of the saints. St.. Al- 
phonsus says, (Conformity to the 
Will of God, Ch.V,5), quoting St. 
Teresa of Avila, "While we live 
here, our gain is not in any in- 
crease of enjoyment of God, but 
in doing His will." 

"We should pay great attention 
to this point," says St. Alphonsus, 
(lb), "because when some weak 
souls experience spiritual dryness, 
they think that God has abandoned 
them or at least that they are not 
suited for a spiritual life and on 
this account, neglect prayer and 
lose the benefit of all they have 
done. For the most part, the saints 
have lived in a state of dryness 
and not of sensible devotion." 

This is a mistake that even those 
religious can make who have made 
real progress and to whom God 
has given some of His more sub- 
stantial graces. They lose that in- 
terior spirit of recollection and the 

368 



joy of the presence of God and 
they are left almost completely 
without any feeling of devotion. 
Then after a few years they be- 
come discouraged and gradually 
give themselves up either to exces- 
sive activity or little by little they 
give in to worldly interests and 
distractions. They seek outside 
'compensations' for their former 
sweetness in prayer and the service 
of God. This is a big mistake! 
Just when God is preparing them 
to receive greater graces of prayer, 
they fail God. In times of dryness 
we should be careful to strive for 
even greater detachment and great- 
er recollection and be absolutely 
faithful to prayer. 

We should be faithful to our 
prayer, "even though we feel like 
a rock," according to the advice of 
our Holy Founder. As he said in 
another letter: "I would that you 
were more fervent in prayer: take 
care that you never leave it, for 
that will be your ruin . . . Oh, th 
great treasures they will acquire 
by remaining in prayer when dry 
and desolate." (L,III,245). In his 
next letter to this same person he 
says, "Above all, never leave 
prayer, even though you should 
have to endure the pains of hell.' 

This, of course, was his owr. 
practice. For example we read in 
the diary of his long retreat, (Dec 
10th): "I was dry, distracted 
tempted , I kept myself by sheen 
force at prayer." 



St. Frances de Chantal wrote to 
one of her religious : "You ask, 
what is my way of prayer. Alas! 
my daughter, it is usually nothing 
but distraction and some suffering; 
for how could a miserable soul like 
mine do otherwise, filled as it is 
with a thousand affairs?" Yet this 
question was prompted by a beau- 
tiful exhortation to prayer that St. 
Frances had just addressed to all 
her religious. 

But we may be tempted to say 
to ourselves, "Yes, but these were 
great saints. Their trials and arid- 
ity have nothing in common with 
mine." I wonder if we may not 
be making a mistake here. We 
are inclined to think there are 
just two general states of souls 
and of prayer: the prayer of or- 
dinary religious like ourselves, with 
our everyday difficulties; and then 
the prayer and aridity of the great 
contemplatives. As though there 
were nothing in between and as 
though there were no possibility 
of our getting even anywhere close 
to them. 

Our trials in prayer are not so 
completely different from those of 
the saints that they have nothing 
in common. The advice of our Holy 
Founder to perseverance in prayer 
and his promise of great rewards 
is written to many common souls 
like ourselves. God wants to do 
great things for us as He did for 
the saints, at least in a measure. 

Perhaps it is not good to become 



technical and quote at length the 
authors of mystical theology. But 
the fact is, if a soul is really faith- 
ful in seeking after God, being 
careful to cultivate a spirit of de- 
tachment, mortification and recol- 
lection, — usually it is not too long 
before God takes a more direct 
and exclusive hand in leading that 
soul forward. This He does by 
withdrawing from the soul sensible 
devotion in prayer and at the same 
time He renders it unable to make 
reflections and to reason in prayer. 
This renders prayer very difficult. 
It makes the soul very uneasy and 
very uncertain as to what to do. 
Often with this, the attraction to 
practice virtue is taken away and 
its practice becomes more difficult. 
But the soul must simply persevere 
in the practice of virtue and in its 
prayer despite all repugnance. At 
prayer it must simply do its best 
to remain lovingly attentive to 
God, speak to Him in the best way 
it can and above all be completely 
abandoned to God's good pleasure. 

The advantages of this apparent- 
ly useless prayer are : an experi- 
mental knowledge of our own noth- 
ingness and helplessness which we 
could acquire in no other way; 
greater reverence for God ; detach- 
ment from sensible devotion and a 
corresponding purification of our 
faith ; and above all, a great aban- 
donment to God's will. 

As our Holy Founder expresses 
it in one of his letters: "Spiritual 



369 



dryness, as well as aridity, deso- 
lation and other trials, are gifts 
from the Divine Piety to exercise 
us in perfect resignation to the 
will of God, to detach us from all 
sensible satisfaction, and to make 
us advance in the way of holy per- 
fection in pure faith and spiritual 
poverty. This is the safest road. 
School yourself, therefore, in holy 
virtue, especially genuine humility 
of heart. You will thus dispose 
yourself for the reception of more 
precious favors from heaven." (L, 
1,514) This thought he expresses 
very often. 

The last objection that the soul 
can offer to all these arguments, 
is this : "If I knew that this deso- 
lation came from God, I should be 
satisfied ; but what troubles me is 
the fear that it is occasioned 
through my own fault." That is 
an excellent consideration. It may 
be true ; it may not be true. Proba- 
bly it is better if we think it is. 
Then we will be more humble. 

When we are troubled by fre- 
quent difficulty in prayer, it is 



certainly well for us to examine 
ourselves. Then if there is any 
definite fault that we can put our 
finger on, by all means, let us cor- 
rect it. It may be a lack of recol- 
lection during the day; it may be 
over preoccupation in our work; 
it may be a lack of mortification; 
it may be too much profane read- 
ing and distraction; or finally, it 
may simply be that we are missing 
prayer too often. But whether we 
find anything definite to correct or 
not, to give ourselves up to 'outside 
compensations' or to shorten or 
lose interest in our prayer would 
be to make matters far worse. We 
should do what we can to help 
ourselves and for the rest try to 
be entirely abandoned to God's 
will. 

"When a soul goes to prayer, it 
can derive from it no greater bene- 
fit than that of union with the 
Divine Will," says St. Alphonsus. 
{Conform. Ch.V,5) That is always 
in our power. It is that conformity 
that leads to, and even is, the 
love of God. 



^.JWattkw, C.<P. 



370 



Novenas 



PASSIONIST CUSTOMS 

1937 Official Latin Edition 

Summary : I. Times of greater recollection. II. Special acts of virtue. III. Mortifications 
IV. Horarium. 



I. Like almost all religious 
orders, we have certain times 
throughout the year for special rec- 
ollection, to stimulate us more and 
more in the practice of virtue. 
These times, exclusive of the an- 
nual retreat, are the novenas pre- 
ceding some of the more solemn 
feasts, as designated in the Regu- 
lations. They are to be made by 
all the religious, even to the extent 
of postponing other works which 
are not urgent or necessary. 

II. The method we follow in mak- 
ing these novenas is as follows. 
At the end of recreation on the 
evening before the novena starts, 
all kneel and say an Ave Maria 
together, before the Superior gives 
his usual sentiment. Then in si- 
lence, one of the Clerics, or in 
non-student houses, the Priest low- 
est in deanship, passes a box of 
tickets, so that each religious may 
draw one. On these tickets are 
marked the day on which the cus- 
tomary acts of mortification are 
performed and a special virtue to 
be practised, as well as a brief 
prayer to be recited daily. These 
tickets are prepared by the Clerics 
or Novices, and in other houses 
by one of the Priests. The cus- 



tomary acts for one's day are : 
keeping silence all day, even during 
recreation and walk, if it is a walk 
day ; sitting on the floor with head 
uncovered for noon meal, and leav- 
ing the pittance; prostrating after 
dinner in the corridor; washing the 
dishes and reciting the rosary ; 
making culpa before supper, and 
begging prayers after supper. The 
pittance is never passed by at sup- 
per. If there is some necessity for 
speaking on that day, the Superior 
may dispense for a while anyone 
who asks it, just as he usually 
dispenses the weak and convales- 
cent from eating on the floor and 
leaving the pittance. But even 
these come to the kitchen and re- 
cite the rosary while the others 
are washing the dishes. 

III. The tickets should be ar- 
ranged so that each day the same 
number of religious have their day 
of mortification. Feast days, how- 
ever, are excepted. It is an old 
custom not to serve fruit during 
novenas, unless circumstances make 
it necessary to have it as a pit- 
tance on fast nights. At noon meal 
only cheese is passed. Likewise, 
it is customary not to serve fruit 
from the 1st of August to the feast 



371 



of the Assumption, a pious prac- 
tice of our Holy Founder, called 
the Lent of our Lady. Those who 
wish to keep the entire Lent as 
our Holy Founder did, abstain 
from fruit beginning on July 5th. 
The Saint usually said, however, 
that it was sufficient for others to 
abstain from the 1st of August. 

IV. During the novena the or- 
dinary horarium is unchanged, ex- 
cept for the function during the 
time of evening prayer. In some 
retreats the novena for Christmas 
is public, for the benefit of the 
faithful who wish to attend. Then 
services are held in the morning 



during prayer time or immediately 
afterwards. If the function is dur- 
ing the second half-hour of morn- 
ing prayer, then the whole hour of 
prayer will be made in the eve- 
ning; if after the morning prayer, 
then there will be only a half-hour 
of prayer in the evening. During 
the other novenas, services are dur- 
ing the first or second half-hour of 
prayer, or even before Compline, 
if more convenient. But it would 
be an abuse to have it after supper 
or after rosary. The prayers for 
these functions are described in 
our Ritual, and nothing is to be 
added to make them last longer 
than the customary half-hour. 




References to "Ius Particulare" 

1 Normae IV, 24. 2 Decretum, 31 Martii 1919. 3 P. Seraphim, Consuet., 
Praeloquium, p. XII. 4 P. Seraphim, Consuet., Jnsciptio praevia... 5 P. Bernardo, 
Consuet., p. 5. fi Sylloge, p. 7. 7 Statu ta, n. 118. 8 Battandier, Guide canon., 
p. 47. 9 Normae, n. 28. 10 Collect™ Caeremon. (1912), p. 3. » Bastien, Direct- 
torio Canon., n. 551. 



372 



Customs and Liturgy 



lus Particulate C.P. 




THE CUSTOMS 



NOTION 

APPROVAL 

UTILITY 



(Pt. I, T. 

118. Rules and Con- 
stitutions contain on- 
ly the principal laws 
of a Community, 
whether they be constitutive or 
directive. Smaller and secondary 
matters are determined by usage 
from which arises a custom. The 
collection of the customs is called 
the "Book of Customs" or Direc- 
tory. 

The Book of Customs needs no 
approbation of the Church. It suf- 
fices that it be approved by the 
Highest Superior or by the Gen- 
eral Chapter. It is becoming, how- 
ever, that a copy be sent to the 
Sacred Congregation, so that the 
Sacred Congregation may know a- 
bout it; 1 for Institutes of women 
this is explicitly prescribed. 2 

It is evident that a book of cus- 
toms is of great value. Our Father 
Seraphim tells us that a religious 
society improves not by innova- 
tions, but by fidelity and constancy 
in those things that it has received 
from its Founder, either by his 
example, or by his writings, or by 



V. Ch. III.) 

tradition. 5 On the other hand if 
the minutiae and daily little things 
are left to the whim of each in- 
dividual, grave inconveniences fol- 
low and that uniformity of acting 
is lost which is the foundation of 
order and peace in a community. 
"Let no one dare to overthrow 
those sacred customs which our 
Fathers introduced with so much 
labor and which proceeded from 
divine light." 4 

119. The first to 
CUSTOM BOOK compile a collec . 

CONGREGATION tion of Customs 
in our Congrega- 
tion was Fr. Seraphim of the Sa- 
cred Heart of Jesus. In the year 
1875 he edited a volume entitled: 
Customs of the Congregation of the 
Most Holy Cross and Passion of 
our Lord Jesus Christ, transmitted 
to us by our forefathers. It was 
called a truly golden work by the 
revisors (three General Consultors 
of the time) as well as a comple- 
tion of the Rule ; it presents the 
ancient usages of our Institute and 
the laudable customs; it was 



373 



praised by the then Father Gen- 
eral, Fr. Dominic of the Name of 
Mary. 

Another collection of customs is 
due to the labor and study of 
Most Reverend Father Bernard 
Mary of Jesus who edited his col- 
lection in 1888 in Italian. 

In 1914 the Thirtieth General 
Chapter (Decree 18) seeing the 
utility of having one text of cus- 
toms, commissioned the General 
Curia to produce a new single text 
of customs from the two existing 
ones, and in case of doubt, give the 
text of Fr. Bernard the prefer- 
ence. Thus in 1920 the third Col- 
lection of customs appeared which 
by vote of the Chapter was the 
authentic version. By 1931 the 
General Chapter decided that the 
Collection of Fr. Bernard be trans- 
lated into Latin and amended by 
the General Curia as it might see 
fit, according to the mind of the 
18th Decree of the Thirtieth Gen- 
eral Chapter. 

In consequence of this decision 
the General Curia in 1937 pub- 
lished a book entitled : Sylloge 
praecipuarum Consuetudinem in 
Sodalitate Clericorum Excalceato- 
rum SS. Crucis et Passionis D.N. 
I.C. ex maiorum traditione vigen- 
tium. 

120. It is of quite 

^Sy££JA ( »£l some importance to 
OF CUSTOMS . .„ ,\_ _ 

know it the Customs 

presented in the above named Syl- 
loge have the weight of law or not, 

374 



so that their transgression would^ 
make the members of our Congre-i 
gation breakers of a law. In thisl 
matter Fr. Bernard wrote in his( 
booklet: Customs here presented 
are not new laws, but rather the 
application and declaration of the» 
spirit of our Congregation; there- 
fore their transgression does not! 
carry with it the violation of a 
law, but only a deviating from the 
path placed by our forefathers. 5 
The same we read in the new Syl- 
loge : The Customs here presented 
are not proposed as new laws, if 
you except those matters sanctioned 
by the Sacred Canons, the Rule or 
the Regulations, but as explana- 
tions and practical norms to indi- 
cate the spirit and intention in 
which those things should be per- 
formed that are mentioned or ar- 
ranged. Hence whoever disregards 
matters in the custom book does 
not violate a law, but if he does 
so without sufficient reason, let himi 
remember the admonition of Scrip- 
ture: "Do not transgress the an- 
cient boundaries which your Fa- 
thers have set." 

However, these assertions seem 
to weaken the weight of our cus- 
toms too much; in our Sylloge 
there are true canonical customs, 
this is especially the case when 
practical applications of the Rule 
are described. Consequently the 
Twenty-fifth General Chapter in its 
thirteenth session seems to speak 
more accurately when it says : The 



printed Customs of our Congrega- 
tion have not the force of law ex- 
cept in as far as they are in har- 
mony with our Rules ; doubts in 
this matter are to be solved by the 
Father General and his Consultors. 
Thus the Regulations prescribe 
that all, especially Superiors, have 
at heart above all things to main- 
tain in its integrity and purity the 
deposit of the regular observances 
and holy customs which were hand- 
ed down to us by our first Fathers 
who have received them from our 
Holy Father and Founder himself. 7 



BOOK OF 
CEREMONIES 



121. Customs con- 
cerning Liturgical 
Services are usual- 
ly contained in a special book called 
the Ceremonial. 

Ordinarily the Ceremonial is not 
explicitly approved by the Holy 
See ; 8 as a matter of fact the Norms 
of the Sacred Congregation forbid 
that citations of its decrees be 
made, lest the impression of an 
approval be given. 9 Similar then 
to the Book of Customs, the Cere- 
monial is approved by the General 
Superior or the General Chapter 
as long as its contents do not con- 
tradict any decrees of the Sacred 
Congregation of Rites. 

The first Ceremonial of our Con- 
gregation was printed in 1857 with 
the title: Collectio precum et ora- 
tionum, quae per- variae anni so- 
lemnitates a Clericis SS. Crucis et 



Passionis D.N.I.C. recitantur. This 
first edition had no approbation ; 
after some liturgical prescriptions 
there were prayers and orations to 
be used on certain feasts and dur- 
ing some Novenas ; finally some 
blessings were added and the meth- 
od of conducting the canonical 
visitation. 

Another edition appeared in 1880 
and a third in 1912. This latter 
edition was called the second en- 
larged and emended edition ; it car- 
ries an approbation of the Most 
Reverend Father General, Jeremy 
of the Sacred Thorns. In this ap- 
probation all members are com- 
manded in future to use the Cere- 
monial in the sacred functions and 
to closely follow all therein pre- 
scribed. 10 

«Wnrww» r . 12 2. The Thir- 
OF CEREMONIAL tv _ sec0 nd Gen- 
NEW EDITION Ly becunu ^ en 
eral Chapter in 

its twenty-third decree commis- 
sioned the General Curia to edit a 
new Collection of Prayers and Cer- 
emonies. This edition was to be 
enlarged and amended according to 
the suggestions from the various 
Provinces. The General Curia was 
to insist that this new edition he 
used by all our members. 

Since only a few things were 
suggested to be added or corrected 
the General Curia, to save expens- 
es, had merely a page printed with 
the changes and this appendix was 
sent to all the Provinces. 



375 



Obituaries 1941 




Followers of the Crucified 

XIII. 
Father Isidore of St. Dominic 

Dominic Anthony Nuccitelli, of the Province of the Addolorata, died April 27th, 19 hi in the 
Retreat of Sora (Frosinone) in the 74th year of his life and the 57th of his religious profession. 



IT was towards the end of April 
27th, 1941, and the dawn of 
April 28th was fast approaching, 
this day so full of unspeakable joy 
for the sons of the Passion, when 
Father Isidore of St. Dominic, 
breaking the painful bonds of his 
body, hurried, as we may justly 
hope, to be united with his Breth- 
ren in heaven, there to celebrate 
eternally the Feast of our common 
Father. 

With the death of Father Isidore 
there passed away one of those 
austere figures of the Congrega- 
tion, who, in the observance of the 
Holy Rule, know nothing of ad- 
justment and admit no interpreta- 
tions which are not most precise 
and most rigorous. This is the 
impression which this good Father 
made during his entire life; it cer- 
tainly expresses the best eulogy 

376 



that can be given in a few words. 
Father Isidore was born in the 
strong but still gentile Abruzzo; 
from his native place he seemed 
to have inherited his impressive 
character and his robust physique 
which never left him during the 
58 years of his religious life, nei- 
ther as a private religious nor as 
Superior. He made his Novitiate 
in Palliano under the able and 
worthy Father Raphael of the Side 
of Jesus, later to die a holy death 
in Argentina. According to the 
testimony of a fellow-novice Fa- 
ther Isidore made his novitiate 
with more than ordinary zeal. Af- 
ter his religious profession he went 
through the regular courses in 
Philosophy and Theology without 
any letting down in his religious 
life. Towards the end of the course 
of his studies his health seemed to 



fail. The then Superiors took all 
care to ward off such a disaster by 
taking him out of the formal 
course of studies and putting him 
with one of our able Fathers who 
was to be his private tutor and 
also have utmost regard for the 
physical condition of his pupil. 
Happily the condition passed away 
and Father Isidore was ordained 
to the Priesthood. 

Again in perfect health, very 
soon after his ordination he was 
appointed Lector and Director of 
Students and later Master of Nov- 
ices. In both these positions he 
studied to impress upon those in 
his charge his own character and 
spirit of exact religious and in- 
flexible observance. Later events 
brought him the Rectorship of sev- 
eral houses in the Province ; then 
also Consultor and also Provincial, 
both of the Province of the Ad- 
dolorata and of the Side of Jesus. 
For a short time he was a simple 
religious without any responsibili- 
ty, but soon was again elected Rec- 
tor and in that capacity he re- 
mained till the last Provincial 
Chapter before his death, 1940. 

It is needless to say that in 
these various appointments, carry- 
ing with them all the heavy 
responsibilities, Father Isidore 
showed the full firmness of his 
character by insisting on the full 
observance, whilst he himself went 
ahead of all with his example. It 
would be wrong, however, to con- 



clude from all this that Father Isi- 
dore was merely hard as a rock 
and nothing more ; on the contrary 
he knew how to combine a gentle- 
ness of manner and affability with 
his fortitude, so that he gained the 
esteem and good will of even peo- 
ple in high positions, both among 
the clergy and the laity. This is 
proven by the fact that he often 
received help and donations from 
them for the Retreats. 

On occasions he also showed le- 
gal talent and laid great stress on 
the rules and formalities of Canon 
Law. His hobby, almost irresisti- 
ble, seems to have been to improve 
the appearance of his Retreats. Al- 
so here he revealed good judgment 
and taste. 

The paternal charity of Superi- 
ors which the Holy Rule demands 
was conscientiously practiced by 
Father Isidore. He always spoke 
to his religious in an affable, al- 
most affectionate manner. The es- 
teem and affection in which Father 
was held was clearly demonstrated 
on February 8th, 1940 when he 
celebrated the 50th anniversary of 
his ordination to the Holy Priest- 
hood. There was a holy rivalry 
among the Superiors, the Religious 
and even the laity to enhance the 
occasion. 

Although he was Superior the 
most of his religious life, never- 
theless he did not neglect the Min- 
istry of the Confessional. He was 
a much sought Confessor both in 



377 



and out of the Retreat, especially 
in convents. On account of the 
weak caliber of his voice, on Mis- 
sions he limited his activity to that 
of Catechist. 

During the preliminary sessions 
of the 46th Provincial Chapter in 
1911, Father Isidore, then 2nd Con- 
suitor, gave a "beautiful and 
learned discourse" as the minutes 
relate. This talk was later put in 
printed form. It was in this chap- 
ter that he was elected Provincial 
the first time. 

Our good Father Isidore was 
born February 13th, 1867 in Scur- 
cola Marsicana (Aquila). His par- 
ents, Cajetan and Rose Nuccitelli. 
In Holy Baptism he received the 
name Dominic Anthony. In 1883 
he entered the Novitiate at Pali- 
ano and there made his Profession 
December 21st, 1884. He was or- 
dained to the Priesthood February 
8th, 1890. 

During the course of 1940 he 
mentioned liver ailments and other 
disturbances. For quite a while 
he had also been suffering from 
hernia. He was sent to the Retreat 
of Sora in order to receive treat- 
ment from the renowned Dr. Nicho- 
las Nota, but with little improve- 
ment, in fact his condition seemed 
to grow worse. It was decided to 
perform an operation and conse- 
quently he was sent to the hospital. 
Here he was treated by the eminent 
Dr. Zeri, and the Sisters of Chari- 



ty — in fact by all the personnel 
of the hospital with that careful 
attention which is always given our 
religious in that hospital. 

After the first operation, a sec- 
ond one seemed necessary. But the 
condition of the patient was such 
that another operation was impos- 
sible. He suffered much and al- 
ways with patience and resigna- 
tion. After some time when it be- 
came clear that further treatment 
was useless and that the end was 
near, he was taken back to the 
Retreat, as he himself desired in 
order to be able to die in the midst 
of his brethren. His condition 
grew steadily worse and on the 
evening of April 26th, after the 
Novena Devotions in honor of our 
Holy Founder, Father Rector, ac- 
companied by the entire Communi- 
ty with lighted candles, brought 
him Holy Viaticum; then Extreme 
Unction was administered with the 
accompanying prayers and absolu- 
tions. During this whole time Fa- 
ther was conscious and devoutly 
followed everything. Before re- 
ceiving Holy Viaticum he ad- 
dressed a few words to the Com- 
munity as best he could and asked 
pardon for all failings against his 
Superiors and all the Religious of 
the Province. This he had also 
done on the preceding Maundy 
Thursday. At the time he was in i 
the hospital and he requested one 
of the Fathers to ask pardon in 
his stead from the Community as 



378 



a preparation for a good Easter 
Communion. 

He calmly expired during the 
night of April 27th at 10:45. Dur- 
ing the evening hours of April 
28th after the Second Vespers and 
the Veneration of the relic of our 
Holy Founder, the body was car- 
ried in procession to the church. 
Here the people had waited in or- 
der to see the remains and kiss 
his hands. 

The following morning after the 
Office and Mass of the Dead, Fa- 
ther Rector gave an address in 
memory of the deceased and then 
the body was carried to the ceme- 



tery accompanied also by a large 
crowd of the laity. Here again 
Father Rector spoke a few words 
thanking all who had come to pay 
their respects. Finally the body 
was placed in the Community Mor- 
tuary Chapel. In the construction 
of this Chapel also, Father Isidore 
had given his assistance with his 
building talents. 

May his blessed soul repose in 
the eternal peace of heaven and 
even as our Holy Founder, St. Paul 
of the Cross, on his very Feast 
Day, took this worthy worker from 
his mystical vineyard, may he also 
quickly send many others similar 
to him to take his place. 




879 




GENERAL CURIA 



The General Curia in a meeting of 
February 11th, 1948, in view of the 
fact that Saint Gabriel of the Sor- 
rowful Mother is the Special Patron 
of our Students and Novices, decreed, 
that in all our Retreats whenever the 
Mass and Office of St. Gabriel are 
transferred liturgically, also the ex- 
ternal festivity be transferred to the 
same day on which Mass and Office 
are prescribed. 

II 

Since Very Reverend Father Mar- 
cellus of the Anunciation was nomi- 
nated Provincial of the Latere Christi 
Province, the General Curia in a meet- 
ing of May 21, 1949 conferred the 
office of Vice-Postulator upon Father 
Robert of Our Lady of Good Counsel 
of the Presentation Province. 

Ill 

Today in nearly every Province of 

the Congregation beyond the aposto- 

late of the word there is also the 

apostolate of the pen. This form of 



apostolate is most opportune namely 
by editing writings, especially maga- 
zines which bring the word of the 
Cross to individual families and make 
the fruits of our preaching more last- 
ing. 

However, lest abuses creep in 
against our vow of poverty which the 
Holy Rule calls the banner of our 
Congregation and according to the 
mind of St. Paul of the Cross is an 
essential element of our spirit; and 
lest, against the prescription of the 
Rule, our sustenance be received from 
regular and stable income, Most 
Reverend Father General reminds all 
Superiors that any profit from afore- 
said periodicals, after having sub- 
tracted the necessary and accessory 
expenses, may not be used for the 
benefit of the Retreat but must entire- 
ly and exclusively be given to the 
Preparatory Seminary of the Pro- 
vince, because, according to the 25th 
decree of the Thirty-First General 
Chapter, only the Preparatory Semi- 



380 



naries may have certain and stable 
income. (Bolletino Vol. I, p. 177) 

For the same reasons all profit from 
the selling of religious articles must 
be given to the Preparatory Seminary. 

In order that all this be faithfully 
observed Most Reverend Father 
General, with the consent of his Con- 
suitors, commands that in the annual 
report both of the Province and of the 
Retreats it be declared how much in- 
come was received from the editing 
of magazines and from the sale of re- 
ligious articles. 



GENERAL POSTULATION 

From the report given in the last 
issue of the Acta Congregationis we 
find that during the year 1948 posi- 
tive steps towards beatification have 
been taken for the following members 
of our Congregation: Father Bernard 
Mary of Jesus, former General; Fr. 
Nicephorus and his 25 Companions 
martyred in Spain during the recent 
revolution; Fr. John of the Holy 
Spirit; the Novice Galileo Nicolini. 



STS. JOHN AND PAUL 

(Rome) 
It is hardly conceivable that any one 
who ever was "de familia" in Sts. 
John and Paul would not have a dis- 
tinct recollection of Fra Francesco. 
On April 21st, 1949 he celebrated the 
golden Jubilee of his Profession. Fra 
Francesco is a Spaniard by birth and 
on September 20th reached his 70th 
year. He made his profession in 1899; 
this was followed by 10 years of faith- 
ful service in his own Province of the 
Sacred Heart. In 1909 he was called 
to Sts. John and Paul in Rome where 
he rendered very faithful services, es- 



pecially as tailor for the Community, 
a no mean task in our Generalate 
House. In 1921 he heard of the great 
need of a Lay-Brother in the recently 
established Mission in Peru; he offered 
his services to Father General. As a 
consequence his field of labors for the 
next 11 years was in the foreign mis- 
sions where he did valuable work not 
only caring for the temporal wants of 
his confreres, but also, as far as a 
Lay-Brother can, gave assistance in 
the ministerial line. In 1932 he was 
recalled to Sts. John and Paul, where 
he still is. For over 14 years he acted 
as Infirmarian; at present he assists 
the saintly Fra Gerard as porter. The 
reporter tells us that in spite of his 
age he still retains a youthful spirit 
full of initiative and enthusiasm. May 
the blessed Mother, towards whom he 
ever cherished a tender devotion, keep 
him with us for many a year to come ! 



On February 10th, 1949 the remains 
of Fr. Germain of St. Stanislaus, the 
Spiritual Director of St. Gemma, were 
exhumed from the common Passionist 
vault in Campo Verano, Rome, and 
after authentication were placed in a 
twofold container. On the 17th of 
the same month they were privately 
taken to our Retreat of Sts. John and 
Paul in Rome; from there they were 
taken to Luca; on the way the Nuns 
in the Monastery at Corneto had the 
privilege of having them within their 
walls for about an hour. Since the 
arrival in Luca was at night they 
were placed in the room where St. 
Gemma died. Early the next morning 
they were transferred to the church 
of St. Mary. Here at 3 P.M. the 
solemn procession with the remains 



:wi 



started for the church of St. Gemma; 
here services were held, including a 
sermon by His Excellency Bishop 
Battistelli, C.P., and the Absolution 
by the Archbishop of Luca. The next 
morning after a solemn Mass by our 
General Procurator, V. Rev. Fr. Al- 
fred the relics found their temporary 
resting place in the choir of the Pas- 
sionist Nuns in Luca. Eventually 
they will be placed near the relics of 
St. Gemma. 



The work on the facade of Sts. John 
and Paul is progressing and with 
every day, so to say, new discoveries 
are being made as to the antiquity, 
etc. of the building. 



PRESENTATION PROVINCE 

(Roman) 
The Very Reverend Father Pro- 
vincial of the Presentation Province 
received a letter from the Secretari- 
ate of State of His Holiness, dated 



April 7th, 1949, in which the Apos- 
tolic Blessing was given to all those 
who with labor or offerings help to 
finish the work on the Sanctuary of 
our Lady of Grace in Nettuno. Work 
on this church was begun in the far 
off 1909. The letter states that now 
is the opportune time to finish the 
enterprise in view both of the coming 
Holy Year and the fact that remains 
of Bl. Mary Goretti rest there, whose 
canonization is expected also in the 
coming year. 

The "Acta Congregationis", July 
1949 carries this letter in full and has 
an added note which reads in a free 
translation : 

In view of the preceding letter as 
well as the words of approval and 
praise given by the Holy Father 
towards the finishing and enlarging 
the Sanctuary of Blessed Mary of 
Grace, which Sanctuary is being 
erected also in honor of Blessed Mary 
Goretti, Virgin and Martyr, whose 



Community at Sts. John and Paul, Rome, June 24, 1949. 




■;-/ 



m 



-i 



C 




M . 



body rests in the said church; also 
in view of the large and increasing 
number of the faithful who come to 
Nettuno from all of Italy and also 
from foreign countries to visit the 
shrine of this new Agnes of the 
twentieth century, Most Reverend Fa- 
ther General earnestly exhorts all the 
Father Provincials of our Congrega- 
tion to efficaciously promote this holy 
work, by which also honor will come 
to our Congregation. His Paternity 
considers it quite in place that in each 
Province a capable priest be appointed, 
who, having obtained the necessary 
faculties, will collect money to be sent 
to the building committee of Sanc- 
tuary at Nettuno. 



On May 8th, 1799 the soldiers of 
Napoleon desecrated our church of the 
Presentation. Among other things 
they robbed the image of Mary of its 
jewelry and threw it into the sur- 
rounding woods; furthermore they 
took the consecrated hosts and sacri- 
legiously threw them about; it was 
on this occasion that Father Benedict 
of St. Joseph, C.P., daring the opposi- 
tion of the armed soldiers, reverently 
gathered the sacred particles and con- 
sumed them. On the 150th anniver- 
sary of this outrage solemn repara- 
tion was made. At early dawn the 
pilgrims started to climb the Mount. 
It is estimated that eventually some 
3,000 were present for the occasion; 
this is quite a crowd for the secluded 
Monte Argentaro. Promptly at 10:00 
A.M. his Excellency Bishop Galeazzi 
in full pontificals, proceeded to place 
a crown of gold both on the Blessed 
Mother's picture and on the Infant 
Jesus. Then he celebrated Pontifical 



High Mass. During the Mass his 
homily centered on the Mystery of the 
Immaculate Heart of Mary. In the 
afternoon the Picture of the Blessed 
Mother was carried in public proces- 
sion. Again the Bishop preached and 
exhorted that at some opportune time 
also a Eucharistic Procession be ar- 
ranged to repair the injury to the 
Blessed Sacrament perpetrated on the 
same occasion of the dishonoring of 
the Blessed Mother. The picture in 
question dates back to the time of 
our Holy Founder and is ordinarily 
kept in the choir of the Retreat. 



On the same May 8th a new Re- 
treat was solemnly opened in the Pro- 
vince at Mascalucia, Sicily. The event 
was preceded by a Triduum; many 
dignitaries, including our Most Rever- 
end Father General graced the occa- 
sion. Many pilgrims came also to pay 
their homage to our Lady of Sorrows, 
whose statue, heretofore honored in a 
little shrine is now on the altar of the 
chapel in the Retreat. 



PROVINCE OF THE "PIETA" 

(Italy) 
Often after a Servant of God is 
canonized, miracles through his or her 
intercession become less frequent and 
with this the interest in the Saint 
gradually wanes away. Not so with 
our St. Gabriel. Every issue of 
"L'Eco di S. Gabriele" official organ 
of the shrine at Isole del Gran Sasso, 
just bulges with reports of cures, fa- 
vors received etc. There is even a 
special section recounting cures on 
children entitled "Corona d'Angeli", 
beyond the section with the title 
"Pioggio di Fiori" or something simi- 



888 



lar, recounting favors for adults. Oc- 
casionally acknowledgments come even 
from the USA. The May 1949 issue 
had as part of its frontispiece a pic- 
ture of an outside spectacular proces- 
sion held in Montreal, Canada, on the 
Feast of St. Gabriel, this year. — In 
the chronological section of the July 
number it was recorded that the C.P. 
University students from Rome visited 
the shrine of St. Gabriel. The ac- 
count called them "dottori in erba". 
We have reason to suspect that the 
Province of Holy Cross was repre- 
sented and that we were not forgot- 
ten at the tomb of St. Gabriel. 



ST. JOSEPH PROVINCE 

(England) 
The Province that has the honor of 
guarding the mortal remains of Ven- 
erable Father Dominic of the Mother 
of God commemorated the centenary 
of his death with an eight-day cele- 
bration, starting on Sunday, August 
21st and closing the following Sunday. 
Naturally this was carried out in Sut- 
ton where Ven. Dominic's body is kept. 
Every day there was Solemn High 
Mass, four of which were Pontifical. 
The Apostolic Delegate graced the oc- 
casion with the opening Holy Mass. 
Every evening of the week there were 
devotions and sermon; some of the 
sermons being delivered by men in the 
Episcopal rank. The days were closed 
with solemn, sometimes Pontifical 
Benediction. On August 28th the an- 
nual pilgrimage was made to the tomb 
of Venerable Dominic; this was fol- 
lowed by a Eucharistic Procession in 
the Monastery Grounds and Pontifical 
Benediction. 



PROVINCE OF ST. PAUL 
OF THE CROSS 

(East USA.) 

A second time within two months 
Holy Cross Seminary lost a valuable 
member of the community with the 
death of Fr. Emmanuel of the Preci- 
ous Blood. Fr. Emmanuel was carried 
off suddenly by a severe cerebral 
hemorrhage. For a Passionist who 
had been crucified by ill-health for 
about sixteen years, it was most ap- 
propriate that his departure from this 
world should occur within the octave 
of the Feast of the Solemn Commemo- 
ration of the Passion, Feb. 25th, the 
day of his death being the fourth day 
within that octave. The body was re- 
moved to St. Michael's Retreat, Union 
City, N. J., and on the following 
March 1st the funeral mass was cele- 
brated and burial was provided in our 
private cemetery on the property. 

Fr. Emmanuel was born in Kings- 
ton, N. Y., Oct. 5th, 1888, and was one 
of a large family of boys and girls, 
of whom six are still living. His 
parents were Patrick and Ann O'Neill 
Carey. Fr. Emmanuel started his 
Passionist life and training in our pre- 
paratory school of that time at St. 
Mary's Monastery, Dunkirk, N. Y. He 
made his religious profession on 
March 7th, 1905 at our novitiate in 
Pittsburgh, Penna. He made his ec- 
clesiastical studies at our monasteries 
in Baltimore and Union City. At this 
latter place he was ordained to the 
priesthood on Dec. 21, 1912, by the 
Most Reverend J. J. O'Connor, Bishop 
of Newark. 

For the first five years of his priest- 
ly life Fr. Emmanuel served in the 
capacity of Provincial secretary. He 



384 



left this post in the Fall of 1917 to 
assume the charge of professor of 
Moral Theology, an occupation in 
which he continued for a term of 
years with marked success. In Sep- 
tember, 1920, he was appointed Vice- 
Rector of St. Gabriel's Monastery, 
Brighton, Mass., and remained in this 
post for about three years. In 1923 
he was elected to the Rectorship of 
Holy Cross Preparatory Seminary in 
Dunkirk, N. Y. His Obituary informs 
us that during his term of office at 
Holy Cross "he strove earnestly to 
raise the standards and advance the 
interests of the school. A lasting 
monument to his memory is the facul- 
ty wing, which he built and which was 
sorely needed at the time." In 1926 
he was elected to the Rectorship of 
Our Lady of Sorrows Retreat, Spring- 
field, Mass. 

After he was relieved of the re- 
sponsibility of office, he joyfully de- 
voted all his time and energy to the 
work of preaching. He was an excel- 
lent preacher of missions and retreats 
and for special occasions. He spared 
no pains in the preparation of his ser- 
mons, with the result that he preached 
in a very effective manner and his 
labors were most acceptable alike to 
the clergy, religious and the laity. 

The Obituary gives the following 
excellent appreciation of Fr. Em- 
manuel's priestly and religious char- 
acter: 

"Father Emmanuel never spared 
himself, for among his gifts was a 
sturdy physical constitution, and he 
gloried in the strength which God had 
given him. All his life he had been 
able to laugh at sickness, and as a 
student and a young priest he had 



hardly ever been troubled by even the 
slightest physical indisposition. But 
about sixteen years ago he was 
stricken with an illness which under- 
mined his health. In the midst of his 
days, in the prime of his manhood, his 
strength failed and he found himself 
a chronic invalid. Never again was 
he to know the physical power which 
had once been his and which had en- 
abled him to work so arduously for 
God. For a few years he was hopeful 
that more rest and better care of him- 
self would enable him to regain what 
he had lost, his health, and that he 
would be able to continue his work, 
but all was to no avail. Again and 
again he thought that his health was 
at least partially restored and that he 
could resume his work on the missions 
but each time his strength failed, and 
finally he was obliged to admit that 
his missionary days were over. The 
old ambition to work for God and 
souls still animated him and urged 
him on; it was with him to the end. 
Although he had not preached in ten 
years, there was on his desk when he 
died a four page manuscript — a draft 
of a sermon on humility — which from 
the references it contained can be 
positively identified as the work of the 
last few days of his life. Almost to 
the end he clung to a faint hope that 
God might restore his health and use 
him again in the works of the 
ministry. It was hard for him to sit 
by quietly and see his ambition frus- 
trated, to realize that the Apostolate 
of Suffering must replace the Apos- 
tolate of Action. 

"Father Emmanuel preached many 
an eloquent sermon during his priest- 
ly years but no sermon of his was 



:wr> 



ever as effective as the one he 
preached by the manner in which he 
bore the heavy cross of ill health for 
so many years. When he first real- 
ized his condition, then began his 
Gethsemani, and as he told a class- 
mate and friend, for two years he 
pleaded with God, not in rebellion but 
in a spirit of resignation, that this 
chalice might pass — that another way 
in which he might serve might be 
found — that his health might be re- 
stored in part at least, so that he 
might be able to work in some way 
in the Vineyard. But then he recog- 
nized the finger of God, pointing the 
way in which he must walk, the way 
of silent, patient suffering, and with 
a firm step he set his feet to walk 
therein. There were many sleepless 
nights, there were days of intense 
pain, there were hours of discourage- 
ment and depression, for there was 
no hope of relief in the days to come, 
but in the midst of these storms of 
his lower nature, there was peace in 
his soul — a peace that came from his 
strength, his strength of faith to see 
that this for him was the Will of 
God and his strength of fortitude to 
conform his will to the divine will. 
God was asking of him a sacrifice 
which was hard and difficult and he 
shrank from it. There were times 
when the question "Why?" arose in 
his mind, but he quickly realized that 
he had no right to ask it of God and 
that God never answers it, even if it is 
asked. He realized that he was on 
this earth for only one purpose, to do 
the will of God and to do that will in 
the manner in which God wishes it 
done and therefore fortified by the 
principles which he had so often in- 



culcated in others, he was able to add, 
as did his Master — to his prayer for 
release — those words of complete 
abandonment, "nevertheless, not as I 
will, but as Thou wilt." 

"Those who lived with Father Em- 
manuel during his long years of phy- 
sical trial, bear witness to the fact 
that he did not allow his illness to 
sour or warp his character, but he 
used it as a means of growing closer 
to God. He made it a point to keep 
posted on the projects in which each 
member of the Community was en- 
gaged, ministerial, scholastic, or 
otherwise, and to discuss them with 
the individuals concerned, and to re- 
joice with them at their prosperous 
outcome or to sympathize with them 
if things did not turn out well. As a 
student, he was known for his wil- 
lingness to assist at every opportunity 
and this trait of character was es- 
pecially manifest during the years 
when he could no longer teach or en- 
gage in any active work. In endless 
little ways, he sought to serve the 
Brethren and to add to their joy and 
comfort, especially the sick. He him- 
self dreaded becoming helpless and a 
burden to the Community. For a 
time he was threatened with blind- 
ness and so he practised walking along 
the corridor with his eyes closed and 
shaving without a mirror, so that, if 
he should lose his sight, he would be 
able to go around unattended. Be- 
cause of his condition he was unable 
to attend the regular choir observance 
but he joined with the Community in 
prayer as he walked up and down the 
corridor, reciting his rosaries. Some- 
times because of the intense pain in 
his head, he was obliged to omit his 



386 



daily Mass, and he experienced a keen 
sense of loss. He overtaxed his 
strength to attend the last annual re- 
treat, which closed on February 12th, 
and the doctor had to be called the 
next day. Perhaps he realized that 
for him the end was near. . . . His day 
of trial is over and we trust that he is 
now safe with God. ..." 



Fr. Gerard Rooney, C.P., one of our 
able and hardworking lectors, recently 
published Preface to the Bible, a neat 
little treatise on the inspiration, the 
interpretation and inerrancy of Holy 
Scripture. We call it neat both be- 
cause of the general efficiency, brevity 
and good sense of its intellectual and 
scientific composition. In his Fore- 
word the author briefly and adequate- 
ly describes the entire scope of his 
treatise as follows: 

"This book is not intended to be a 
complete Introduction to Scripture. 
Only material essential to the purpose 
of the book has been mentioned con- 
cerning the Canon of the Scriptures, 
the original texts, and their transla- 
tions. This has been done designedly, 
with the twofold purpose of keeping 
the introductory material in sharper 
focus and of permitting greater am- 
plification and clarification in treat- 
ing biblical inspiration, the principles 
of interpretation, and the application 
of those principles to certain par- 
ticular cases. It is meant to be a 
popular presentation (without, we 
hope, sacrificing scientific precision) 
of the essential points which are 
treated in scientific fashion in formal 
treatises. In the body of the book, 
technical language has been avoided 
as much as possible. Notes and 



references carry the reader farther 
when he so desires. A bibliography 
is added for the benefit of those who 
wish collateral reading or more tech- 
nical knowledge. The needs of the 
general reader have been constantly 
kept in mind. In the interest of 
clarity and readability, the body of 
the book has been kept brief .... It is 
hoped that the present work will be of 
benefit to the general reader, to college 
students particularly, to Newman 
clubs, and also to seminarians who de- 
sire a rapid review of essentials of 
General Introduction." 

By way of impartial evaluation we 
may quote the competent opinion of 
Fr. Louis Hartman, C.SS.R., General 
Secretary of the Catholic Biblical As- 
sociation of America. Fr. Hartman 
says: "It is a distinct pleasure to 
recommend most highly the Preface to 
the Bible. ... As a popular presenta- 
tion, this work is written in a very 
interesting and lucid manner, and cer- 
tainly no scientific precision is there- 
by sacrificed. Actually the points 
which are here given special treatment 
are presented in as accurately solid 
a manner as in the most scientific 
treatises on these same questions .... 
No other recent work in English 
treats of these problems in so clear 
and convincing a manner." 



The Catholic Book Publishing Com- 
pany of New York is about to issue 
a work of a priest of our province 
which ought to have a warm welcome 
and a wide circulation among all 
ranks of Catholic readers. The book 
in question is TJie Gem of Christ, The 
Story of St. (lemma of Lucca, and the 
author is Fr. Francis Shea, C. P., who 



387 



wrote Under His Shadow, a highly- 
regarded book of reflections on Our 
Lord's Passion. This new treatment 
of St. Gemma's life story will cer- 
tainly be enjoyed by all those who love 
the reading of the beautiful stories 
of God's saints. It should be an es- 
pecial delight to those who have 
learned to love the sainted Virgin of 
Lucca. It is written in a simple but 
pleasing style, easily to be understood 
by those who must read as they run, 
but at the same time it is literary 
enough to avoid alienating those who 
are fond of rhetorical seasoning even 
in their religious and devotional read- 
ing. 

Our annual ordination to the priest- 
hood took place this year on May 4th 
at our Monastery of Our Lady of 
Sorrows, W. Springfield, Mass. The 
ordaining prelate was the Bishop of 
the Springfield Diocese, The Most 
Reverend Thomas M. O'Leary. The 
new priests are Fr. Benet of the 
Seven Dolors (Kelley), Fr. George of 
the Holy Family (Nolan), Fr. Cyril 
of the Good Thief (Schweinberg), Fr. 
Malcolm of Christ Crucified (Mc- 
Guinn), Fr. Columkille of the Mother 
of God (Regan), Fr. Silvan of the 
Most Holy Trinity (Rouse), Fr. Ven- 
ard of Our Lady of Wisdom (Byrne), 
Fr. Cuthbert of the Most Merciful 
Savior (Sullivan). 

By their priestly ordination, these 
young men, like multitudes before 
them, have consecrated themselves 
body and soul to the Son of God, in 
His office as eternal High Priest of 
the Redemption. Our prayer for them 
is that they may prove themselves fit 
instruments in his hands for long and 
fruitful work in his vineyard. 



A big event this year both for our 
Jamaica monastery and for the pro- 
vince as a whole was the celebration, 
during the three days of April 30th, 
May 1st and May 2nd, of the twenty- 
fifth anniversary of the founding of 
our Parish of the Immaculate Concep- 
tion in Jamaica, N. Y. During these 
days there were Solemn Masses and 
special sermons, and on May 2nd there 
was a jubilee dinner and entertain- 
ment for all the parishioners who de- 
sired to participate. This social event 
of the jubilee celebration was held in 
the Grand Ballroom of the Hotel St. 
George in Brooklyn, N. Y., and was 
attended by more than 1200 parish- 
ioners. 

It is hard to realize that our Ja- 
maica Monastery and Parish are no 
longer exactly a "new" foundation. 
The arrival of this jubilee reminds us 
that almost a generation has slipped 
by since the foundation of the parish 
and that within that time it has ac- 
quired a more or less final shape and 
form. 

Among the large group of person- 
alities who figured in the history of 
Immaculate Conception Parish and 
standing at the head is the Bishop of 
Brooklyn, the Most Reverend Thomas 
E. Molloy, by whose invitation the late 
Very Rev. Fr. Provincial Stanislaus 
gladly undertook to settle our religious 
in the diocese. The present fine 
property having been acquired, a small 
community was stationed in Jamaica 
to begin operations. Fr. Chrysostom 
Smith and Father Albinus Kane be- 
gan the lengthening list of Passionists 
who have devoted their industry and 
zeal in the gradual building-up of the 
fine plant that now exists, though it 



388 



is still incomplete. Succeeding the 
above mentioned Fathers with the 
passing of the years, Fr. Kevin Mur- 
ray, Fr. Conor Monaghan, Fr. Theo- 
dore Noonan, Fr. Chrysostom Dris- 
coll, Fr. Roger Monson, Fr. Eugene 
Kieran, Fr. Huber Arliss, have 
labored in the parish either in the 
capacity of Pastor of or Curate or of 
both. The priests who form the paro- 
chial staff at the present time are 
Fr. Owen Doyle as Pastor and his 
three assistants, Fr. Kieran Richard- 
son, Fr. Maurice Sullivan and Fr. 
Brian Burke. Last but not least the 
Sisters of St. Joseph have had charge 
from the beginning of the teaching in 
the parish school, a work that they 
have carried on to this day with ex- 
emplary efficiency. 

The manner and means by which 
the essential purpose of the parish 
— tireless and ever-expanding work 
for the salvation of the souls whom 
the Bishop has committed to our care 
—is summarized well in the jubilee 
booklet published for the occasion. 
There we read that "since the very 
beginning parish activities grew and 
increased in number and variety to 
the extent of enriching the whole cul- 
tural life of Jamaica. Sodalities for 
the children, a Dramatic Society, the 
Men's Forum, an outstanding Male 
Choir and Holy Name Society, the 
Women's Rosary Society and the 
Junior and Senior B. V. M. Sodalities 
have been radiating "the good odor of 
Christ" among the parishioners and 
friends of the Immaculate Conception 
Parish, and continue to do so at the 
present time. All these activities are 
under the faithful supervision of the 
parish priests, to whose ranks was 



added in October 1948 Father Kieran 
Richardson, C.P., recently returned 
from China after spending ten years 
in the Passionist Missions. Another 
parish agency served personally by 
both Pastors, Father Roger and 
Father Owen, is the nearby Mary 
Louis Academy. At present the lat- 
ter is Professor of Philosophy and 
Church History, Fr. Brian assisting 
in this work. 

"During recent years, fruitful and 
intensely enterprising parish under- 
takings have continued to enjoy suc- 
cess. Redecoration of the Church, 
vast improvements in the School and 
Parish Convent, youth programs and 
sports activities for young people, 
Confraternities of Christian Doctrine 
for Public Grade and High School 
children, and wholesome social func- 
tions marked the progress of the 
Parish. . . . 

"The Immaculate Conception Parish 
has been for the past twenty-five years 
a center of spiritual and civic pros- 
perity. The Church and grounds have 
provided the scenes for youth rallies, 
pilgrimages and varied civic and paro- 
chial activities. Throughout the year 
the beautiful ceremonies of Divine 
Worship unfold in all their splendor. 
At Christmas, the Midnight Mass is 
attended by hundreds of people from 
all parts of the Diocese who enjoy 
the musical renditions of the Immacu- 
late Conception Male Choir, compe- 
tently aided by the Mary Louis Glee 
Club. During Lent the devotions of 
the Passion, carried out with the ful- 
ness of the liturgy, are attended by 
thousands. The Immaculate Concep- 
tion Parish, with the unstinted and 
wholehearted cooperation of its faith- 



;wo 



ful parishioners, has grown in twenty- 
five fruitful years to be a vital organ, 
an active spiritual and civic unit, and 
a powerful asset to the moral life of 
the Borough of Queens." 



Sixteen of our priests recently com- 
pleted their twenty-fifth year of 
priesthood on June 14th just passed. 
They have proved themselves an able 
and hard-working and zealous group 
of Passionists. These Silver Jubi- 
larians are the following: Fr. Allan 
of St. Gabriel (McEachen), Fr. Canice 
of St. Peter (Gardiner), Fr. Ignatius 
of St. Patrick (Ryan), Fr. William 
of St. Joseph (Cavanaugh), Fr. Con- 
on of the Blessed Sacrament 
(O'Brien), Fr. Sylvester of the Sor- 
rowful Virgin (Grace), Fr. Neil of 
Jesus and Mary (McBrearty), Fr. 
Ralph of the Sorrowful Virgin (Gor- 
man), Fr. Hubert of St. Patrick 
(Sweeney), Fr. Hilary of the Heart 
of Jesus (McGowan), Fr. Lucian of 
St. Paul of the Cross (Ducie), Fr. 
Vincent of Jesus (Conners), Fr. Jus- 
tin of the Mother of God (Mulcahy), 
Fr. Gordian of St. Gabriel (O'Reilly), 
Fr. Kenan of the Mother of God 
(Carey). 

The brethren of our province re- 
joice in and with these zealous and 
faithful sons of St. Paul of the Cross. 
The salutation, prayers, good wishes 
and greetings of all are with them 
during these days of their joy. The 
customary heartfelt greetings that are 
extended to these jubilarians are oc- 



companied by the prayer that they 
may have the complete and perfect re- 
newal of all the graces of their 
priestly ordination, so that the remain- 
ing years of their priestly career may 
make them even more worthy minis- 
ters of Christ and that the fruits of 
their priestly ministrations may bring 
forth even more abundant and preci- 
ous fruits to the greater honor and 
glory of God and the salvation of 
souls. 



On July 26th the twenty-fifth No- 
vena in honor of St. Ann in Scranton 
was closed with the record breaking 
crowd of 75,000. It was estimated 
that the attendance already during the 
first three days was 25,000 and then 
gradually grew day by day till its 
reached its culmination on the Feast, 
the closing day of the Devotion. "The 
Scranton Tribune" gave first-page 
headline attention to the event, to- 
gether with pictures of the crowds 
and the dignitaries who were present. 
"The Cross," periodical of our Breth- 
ren in Ireland, claims that the crowds 
attending at the Novena in honor of 
St. Ann in the Passionist church at 
Scranton, surpass all other religious 
gatherings in the USA with the pos- 
sible exception of Eucharistic Con- 
gresses. The Bishop of Scranton, His 
Excellency Bishop Hafey, addressed 
the faithful gathered for the closing 
services and in timely and inspiring 
words impressed upon his hearers now 
all must make a choice between the 



Newly ordained of St. Paul of the Cross Province blessing their Father Pro- 
vincial: Left to right: Fr. Columkille (Regan), Fr. Malcolm (McGuinn) Fr. Cyril 
(Schweinberg), V. Rev. Fr. Gabriel (Gorman), Provincial of the St. Paul of the 
Cross Province, V. Rev. Fr. James Patrick (White) provincial of Holy Cross 
Province. 



390 



^U^&?^$&<£m- 



. 



Mystical Body of Christ, commonly 
referred to as the Catholic Church, 
with its head or seat of authority in 
Rome, and the counterchurch, famili- 
arly known as Atheistic Communism 
with its head and seat of authority in 
Moscow. The Bishop compared the 
present conflict to the trial of Christ 
and reminded the audience that it 
has happened before in history, as for 
instance during the time of Pope Gre- 
gory VII. He also called attention to 
the fact that woman is conspicuously 
absent in Paganism, in Communism, 
whereas Mary is prominently present 
in the camp of Christ, also today. No 
doubt there were many happy hearts 
among those attending the devotions 
and many brought back to God, and 
many strengthened again in the battle 
of life. A particular joy must have 
been accorded to Father John Joseph 
Endler, C.P., who on that day wit- 
nessed a crowning point of the work 
he had inaugurated 25 years previ- 
ous. Also his sister, Sister M. Neo- 
line, of the Sisters of Charity was 
present for the occasion to share her 
brother's joy. May Good St. Ann 
keep the fruits alive and fresh in the 
hearts of all who profited by the No- 
vena. 



The Year Book, 1949, edited by the 
graduation class of St. Joseph's High 
School in New Bern, North Carolina 
is certainly a credit to the Students 
of the school and to the grand work 
of the Fathers of the Province of St. 
Paul of the Cross. The "Josephinum" 
as the book is called gives a fine sum- 
mary of the activities of the school 
and can be quite favorably compared 
to any publication of a similar nature. 



The Province of St. Paul of the 
Cross has a practice after the Ordina- 
tion Ceremony, the newly ordained I 
Fathers bless the ordaining Prelate 
and their Father Provincial before 
blessing their parents. We are happy 
to be able to present our readers with 
a picture of the touching ceremony. 



OUR CHINESE MISSIONS 

During the week of August 15, 
News Commentators announced that 
the Communist Armies in China had \ 
completely taken over the Province 
of Hunan, especially seizing the large 
City of Changsha, around which they 
had been fighting for some time. One 
or two small News Items to this effect I 
were noticed in the daily papers, butt 
nothing of seeming official importance 
or verification has yet been received. 
As a consequence, we are totally un- 
aware of the situation in our Vicariate I 
of Yuanling, Hunan, China. 

From a letter written by Fr. Justin 
Garvey, C.P., at the end of July, we; 
have the following report. Fr. Caspar - 
Caulfield, who returned to China dur- 
ing June, is now safely established in 
Yuanling, bag and baggage. Frs. Ar- ■ 
thur Benson and Bonaventure Griffith i 
have had to return to the U.S. for * 
medical attention. Since Fr. Justin 
happened to be in Hong Kong for" 
medical purposes when Fr. Bonaven- • 
ture departed, Bishop Cuthbert | 
O'Gara wired him to remain at the 
Procuration with Fr. Anthony. Fr. 
Justin reports that Fr. Anthony is 
fine. And he goes on to say: "It seems 
two men are being kept on the spot 
to tide things over in any emergency. 
Really only one is needed, but I sup- 
pose if Canton is taken, then one of 



392 



us will have to keep following the com- 
munications' routes in the hope of 
keeping the Mission supplied." 

In a recent News' Item of the Daily- 
Paper, it was reported that all Ameri- 
cans had evacuated from Canton to 
the Island of Formosa, because of the 
nearness of Communist Armies. We 
wonder where Frs. Anthony and Jus- 
tin went, if they did leave; surely not 
to Formosa, because no communica- 
tions could be kept open from that 
spot. 

For the past several months, as 
gleaned from a letter written from 
Yuanling, May 6th, Mission work has 
had to be suspended for the most part. 
The Vicariate has been neck deep in 
bandits who have literally swallowed 
up the whole mission territory. The 
result has been tragic for the people 
and the work of the Missionaries. All 
this bandit trouble seemed to be a 
softening up process instigated by the 
Communists. Surprisingly enough (or 
is it?), the bandits throughout all 
northwest Hunan rose up simultane- 
ously in a revolt against the Changsha 
Provincial Government. 

What plan will be adopted for the 
Missionaries in the eventuality that 
the Communist Armies take (or have 
taken) over our section of Hunan, is 
mere conjecture. Last reports were 
:hat only a very small skeleton per- 
sonnel would remain. 

All letters from our Chinese Mis- 
ionaries invariably end with heart- 
leaking requests for prayers — 
3rayers for the Missions, prayers for 
he Missionaries, prayers for the 
Church in China, prayers for the 
vhole of China herself. From the 
ooks of things few have any hope for 



improvement of the Chinese situation 
in even the near-distant future. There 
is no pessimism in that statement; it 
is merely factual observation. It 
seems to us that not only our Govern- 
ment, but the Catholic Church in the 
U.S. as well, should unite in an all- 
out campaign in Japan and the Philip- 
pines — our first lines of defense. Now 
is the time of Golden Opportunity in 
those Countries for God and Souls. 
For a while, at the beginning of the 
year, there was serious talk of the 
possibility of a Passionist Mission 
Foundation in Japan. We wonder 
whether there is any chance of this 
possibility becoming an actuality? 
— Fr. Carl, C.P. 



IMMACULATE HEART 
PROVINCE 

(N. Italy) 
June 11th was a big day in S. 
Zenone degli Ezzelini. On that day 
the Ordinary, Bishop Mantiero or- 
dained seven Passionist Theologians 
to the Holy Priesthood in the Monas- 
tery Church. This class represented 
the first-fruits of the rearranged and 
united Theological course of studies. 
On June 12th all offered their first 
Holy Mass in the Retreat Church in 
the presence of many relatives and 
friends. The afternoon was graced 
with a befitting program by the stu- 
dent-body in honor of the newly or- 
dained and for the entertainment of 
the visitors. The day closed with Te 
Deum and Benediction. We have the 
pleasure, through the courtesy of Fr. 
Gustavo, the chronicler, to present our 
readers with a picture of the young 
Levites and also the student-body in 
S. Zenone. Here are the names of the 



393 



young priests in the order they appear 
on the picture, reading from left to 
right: Frs. Severino, Erminio, Bene- 
venuto, Attilio, Umberto, Franco, 
Marino, and in the center Fr. Giulio, 
the Director. The picture of the stu- 
dent body at St. Zenone was taken 
with a distant view of the Retreat at 
S. Zenone in the background. Here 
are the names, standing, from left to 
right: Fr. Severino, (nswly ordained) 
Fr. Marino, (newly ordained) Fr. 
Gustavo, (III Theology) Fr. Edmon- 
do, (III Theology) Confr. Pierluigi (I 
Theology), Cfr. Gaudenzio, (I The- 
ology) Fr. Umberto, (newly ordained) 
Fr. Giulio, Director, Fr. Erminio 
(newly ordained), Fr. Benvenuto 
(newly ordained), Fr. Attilio (newly 
ordained), Fr. Tommasso (III The- 
ology). The front row from left to 
right: Fr. Efrem (III Theology), Cfr. 
Silvestro (I Theology), Cfr. Rinallo (I 
Theology), Fr. Franco (newly or- 
dained), Fr. Reginaldo (III The- 
ology), Cfr. Adriano (III Theology). 
May God bless their endeavors and 
give them perseverance in their high 
calling. 



IMMACULATE 
CONCEPTION PROVINCE 

(Argentina) 
The home Province of our Most 
Reverend Father General comprises 
the whole of Argentina. That it also 
takes in Uruguay may not be so wide- 
ly known. This fact was strongly 
brought to our notice some time ago 
when Fr. Frederick, C.P. sent us a 
copy of the "El Bien Publico", the 
Catholic DAILY of Montevideo. The 
particular issue, May 15th, 1949, 
carried a full page account of the 



"work and ideals of the Passionists in 
Uruguay". The write up contains a 
picture of, and sketch of the life of 
St. Gemma and also of our Holy 
Founder. Complete statistics of our 
Congregation are given, including a 
fine lineup, in fact the best we have 
seen in print, of our foreign missions, 
starting with the so much persecuted 
Bulgaria and ending with the mission 
in Colombia started in 1935 to offset 
non-Catholic Propaganda. Naturally 
and rightly, due space is given to Fa- 
ther General, son of the Province, 
stressing his unique election to the 
Generalship. The little message of Fr. 
Ambrose, Provincial, tells us among 
other things that in 1946 during a 
private audience conceded to Father 
General our present Holy Father gave 
an explicit approval and blessing of 
the work the Passionists are doing in 
Argentina and Uruguay on the many 
ranges. Fr. Norbert, Superior of the 
St. Gemma Foundation in Montevideo 
wrote the account of the establishment 
of the Passionists in Uruguay. The 
paper also carries a picture of the new 
church under construction in honor of I 
St. Gemma and also a picture of the 
sketch of how it will appear when 
completed. St. Gemma is the only 
Passionist foundation in Uruguay and 
although it dates back to 1922 and at 
present there are only two Fathers: 
stationed there, judging from the re- 
ports the hope that soon there will be 
a St. Gemma Retreat in Montevideo 
does not seem to be altogether un- 
founded. Quod faxit Deus! 

Reliable authority has it that the 
"Santa Cruz", publication of the Holy 
Cross Parish in Buenos Aires, intends! 
to transform itself itself into a "Di- 



394 





Above: Neo-presbyters in the Retreat of St. Zenone, Immaculate Heart Pro- 
vince, Italy, with their Fr. Director, Fr. Julius. 

Below: Student Body in St. Zenone. 



395 



gest" of things Passionistic, wherever 
they should appear. 

Steps are being taken to have a 
Monastery of Passionist Nuns in the 
Immaculate Conception Province soon. 



A LATERE CHRISTI 
PROVINCE 

(Italy) 
The Preparatory Seminary of St. 
Gabriel at Trepuzzi made special ef- 
forts to honor its Patron last Febru- 
ary. The whole month was dedicated 
to the Saint. Every day of the month 
the common Spiritual Reading was 
made on the life of St. Gabriel; every 
morning of the month the meditation 
was on some virtue the Saint had 
practised. During the month a 
spirtual bouquet was gathered to be 
presented to him on his Feast Day. 
Every evening of the month there was 
a function in the Church at which one 
of the Seminarians served in turn. 
During the second week each semi- 
narian was to write a five minute let- 
ter to St. Gabriel. In the meantime 
a program was being prepared to be 
presented on the Feast Day. On 
February 18th the solemn Novena was 
opened in the church with both sermon 
and instruction. On the Vigil of the 
Feast there was a High Mass; in the 
P.M. Solemn Vespers and closing of 
the Novena. On the Feast Day itself 
there was the Communion Mass for 
the Students; later the General Com- 
munion Mass for the people; after 
that there was a procession with the 
Statue of St. Gabriel from the Re- 
treat Church to the principal Church 
of the City. Here there was a solemn 
High Mass at which His Excellency 
the Bishop of Oria gave the panegyric. 



The Students sang the Mass to the ac- 
companiment of a string orchestra.! 
In the P.M. the statue was again 
solemnly carried back to the Preparan 
tory Seminary where an altar had 
been prepared at the entrance. Here 
the closing services were held and the 
blessing with the relic of the Saint 
imparted. The day after the Feast 
the letters to St. Gabriel etc. were 
read in a little meeting with the Rec- 
tor and the rest of the Community. 
Surely St. Gabriel was pleased with 
this effort in his honor and will bless 
the Institution that has him as its 
Patron. 



HOLY FAMILY PROVINCE 

(Spain) 

In the early part of this year Very 
Reverend Father Innocent, Provincia 
of the Holy Family Province, Spainij 
brought two Fathers and three 
Brothers of his Province to different 
stations in Central America where 
their services were needed. En routct 
they made a stop at the Retreat ir 
Jamaica for several days. Fr. Inno- 
cent, having been General Consultoi 
for two terms, was acquainted with 
several of the Fathers and also has 
a command of the English language 
The Brothers took their recreatior, 
with the students of whom only one 
knew a bit of Spanish; one of the 
Brothers knew Latin. But the Conn 
mon bond helped communication, ever 
if a bit hilariously. Subsequent let 
ters gave the safe arrival at their re 
spective posts: Frs. Paul and Seguw 
do at Santa Clara, Cuba; Bro. Ma™ 
ano, at Holguin, Cuba; Bro. Albert at 
Tacubaya, Mexico; Bro. Casimir ai 
Barquisimeto, Venezuela. We ar* 



396 




Part of the Jamaica 
Community with the 
Spanish Fathers and 
Brothers on their 
way to Central 
America. 



The Spanish Fathers 
and Brothers on 
their way to Central 
America. From left 
to right: Bro. Al- 
berto, Fr. Pablo, Bro. 
Casimiro, V. Rev. Fr. 
Innocenzo, Brother 
Mariano, Fr. Se- 
gundo. 




Fr. Director of Ja- 
maica with his stu- 
dents and the 
Spanish Brothers. 



happy to be able to present our 
readers with some pictures of the 
group taken at Jamaica between 
February 11th and 16th. Here are the 
names: One top picture: Kneeling: 
Cfrs. Victor Anthony and Paschal. 
Four partial faces in rear: Jogues, 
Gregory, Cassian, John Baptist. 
Standing: Cfr. Kieran, Bro. Albert 
(Spanish) Cfr. Cormac, Fr. Paul 
(Spanish) Cfr. Ronan, V. Rev. Fr. 
Leonard, Rector of Immaculate Con- 
ception Retreat, Jamaica, Bro. Casi- 
mir (Spanish), Cfr. Canisius, V. Rev. 
Fr. Innocent, Provincial of Holy 
Family Province, Cfr. Christopher, 
Cfr. Sebastian, Fr. Segundo (Span- 
ish) Cfr. Flavian, Cfr. Gerald, Bro. 
Marian (Spanish), Fr. Martin 
Joseph, Director of Students in Jam- 
ica. The lower picture: Fr. Martin, 
Director of Students, Cfrs. Jogues, 
Ronan, Kieran, Bro. Albert (Spanish) 
Cfrs. Gregory, Victor Anthony, Cani- 
sius, Bro. Casimir (Spanish), Cfrs. 
Sebastian, Cassian, Bro. Marian 
(Spanish) Cfrs. Gerald, Flavian, 
Paschal. 

HOLY CROSS PROVINCE 

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION 
RETREAT 

(Chicago) 

If the old adage be true that no 
news is good news, then certainly our 
report this time is all good news. For 
we have nothing that hasn't probably 
already reached you by way of the 
grape-vine. 

Among the distinguished visitors to 
our Retreat during the past few 
months was the Very Rev. Fr. Dolan 
the Provincial of the Irish Province of 
Carmelites. He spent an afternoon 



July 13 to 16 were as eventful a& 
any four days of the past few months 
The class from Des Moines arrivee 
at the Monastery on the afternoon oi 
the 13. They were as welcome, oJ: 
course, as any six men could be. Two 
Confraters Rian and Jude, were new 
additions to the class and were not 
known to the classes in Chicago, 
However, that only added to the em 
joyment of the whole day spent to* 
gether the 14. Early the fifteenth thd 
upper class left for Louisville to begir 
their study of morals. The gap they 
left was partially filled the following 
day by the arrival of two of the young 
priests recently finished with then; 
Sacred Eloquence, Fathers Keith ano 
Noel. Father Keith came to become 
a part of this community, and w« 
heartily welcome him. Father Noe 
was merely passing through to joii«[ 
the community in Des Moines. 

The Chicago Retreat is set for an 



398 



other fifty years or so as regards its 
water supply. Brother Leo put in a 
new water main. It was a major 
operation on the grounds and kept the 
back yard looking pretty well torn up 
for about a month. But the job is 
now cleared up and all there is to 
show for it is a scar running from the 
side of the house to the street, where 
the grass is only beginning to grow 
again, and an old ditch-digger which 
looks like it is here to stay. 

The Province might like to know 
that Tony, the old hired man who took 
care of the Monastery grounds here in 
Chicago until little over a year ago, 
died at the city hospital in the early 
summer. The students are still won- 
dering how he managed to keep the 
grounds so neat, especially now that 
that task has fallen to them. 

On the evening of August 1 the 
Sacred Eloquence class arrived in 
Chicago on their way to California. 
It was the first time some of the com- 
munity had seen them in eight years 
and the meeting was certainly a joy- 
ous one. When the young priests left 
the following noon for California, they 
left behind them a memory that is in- 
spiring others to put their whole 
hearts into their preparation for the 
priesthood, so that in a few short 
years our students here might take 
their place beside these other young 
priests of God at the altar of God, 
and might be as promising in their 
Passionist vocations as they are. 



SACRED HEART RETREAT 
(Louisville, Ky.) 
May 15 was a day of special cele- 
bration for this community, since on 
that day Brother Luke completed fifty 
years as a professed Passionist 



Brother. The chief feature was a 
special Solemn Mass with an inspiring 
sermon by Very Rev. Father Rector. 
At noon, a banquet was served for the 
community in the professed recreation, 
and in the evening the students pro- 
vided a program for entertainment of 
all. We pray that Brother may have 
many more years in which to serve 
the Lord with the fervor and fidelity 
which have characterized his life. 

June 11 marked the realization of 
the dreams of five of our students who 
were raised to the priesthood on that 
day. On the same day, six others were 
initiated into sacred orders by the re- 
ception of the subdiaconate. The 
ceremony took place at the Cathedral 
of the Assumption, since on the same 
day, Archbishop Floersh ordained five 
of his own priests. As usual, the cere- 
mony was most inspiring and beauti- 
ful. The sanctuary was packed with 
priests, both secular and regular, and 
the church was well filled with lay 
people. It was a ceremony that will 
be remembered by all concerned for 
many a day. 

The long projected parking lot for 
the use of those who attend Sunday 
Masses is now an accomplished fact. 
It is located on the plot between the 
Monastery and Mt. St. Agnes. This 
new improvement has helped much to 
relieve the conjestion of traffic on Sun- 
day mornings. This, together with the 
now almost finished St. Agnes School, 
brings the parish up to date in every 
way. 

The new class of Students arrived 
from Chicago on July 15. All seem 
well pleased with their new home, ex- 
cept for the heat which has been ex- 
cessive this summer. The Sacred Elo- 



399 



quence class of last year is now dis- 
banded, while the Sacred Eloquence 
class to be has migrated to California 
to be the first class of students ever to 
be stationed at Sierra Madre. They 
consider themselves very fortunate to 
be able to spend this year in America's 
dreamland. 

A couple of changes in the com- 
munity have been announced. Father 
Joyce will teach Moral Theology this 
year, relieving Father Vincent Mary 
from some of his work in order to al- 
low him more time for the Passionist 
and other duties. Father Roger suc- 
ceeds Father Camillus as Lector of 
Sacred Scripture, and Father Gilbert 
goes to California to be Director of 
the Sacred Eloquence class. 

After a year of almost no sickness 
in the community, we were visited 
quite heavily this summer. Father 



Flannon spent several days in the 
hospital for an ailment which the doc- 
tors never succeeded in diagnosing. 
Father Gordian was forced to undergo 
an emergency operation for appendi- 
citis. But the most serious case of 
sickness is perhaps Father Alfred. 
One morning suddenly one side of his 
face was paralyzed. The doctor's ex- 
amination revealed that one of his 
facial nerves had died. The doctor 
thinks it should grow back, but says 
it will take from six to eight months. 
We request prayers for our sick 
brethren. 

The Passionists are highly honored 
in having one of their own conducting 
a Catholic radio program each Sunday 
afternoon. The local chancery re- 
quested a priest to take over the 'In- 
formation Priest' program for two 
months, and Father Forrest was given 




Fr. Rector, Julii 
and Brother Luke 
Jubilee Banquet. 



400 




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401 



the task. The program is conducted 
in question and answer fashion, and 
deals with problems of interest to non- 
Catholics especially. Father is han- 
dling the program very creditably. 

MOTHER OF GOOD COUNSEL 
RETREAT 

(St. Louis) 
If it were not such a trite expres- 
sion we would say that the "Prepan- 
nual" 1949 is better than ever. This, 
its twenty-first volume, is dedicated to 
the Immaculate Heart of Mary, thus 
manifesting that our Preparatory 
Seminary believes in the adage ''Sen- 
tire cum Ecclesia". One of the more 
interesting pictures is that of the en- 
tire Community chanting solemn Com- 
pline with Archbishop Ritter presid- 
ing. Facts and rumors seem to indi- 
cate that the day may not be far off 
when the Preparatory Seminary of 
Holy Cross Province may have a new 
location and a Laymen's Retreat 
House connected with it. 



ST. FRANCIS RETREAT 

(St. Paul, Kansas) 
The Kansas news for this issue of 
'The Passionist' is made up of both 
glad news and sad news. 

On June 6th, six postulants came to 
the novitiate from the Preparatory 
Seminary. The Kansas weather was 
kind to them until they began their 
retreat— then they found out what 
Kansas heat is. 

The new Vice-Master, Fr. Fergus 
arrived on July 7th. Thus Fr. Joel 
was free to leave for his new duties 
in St. Louis. Our prayers and best 
wishes accompany Fr. Joel to his 
assignment at the Prep. School. 



The vestition ceremony took place 
on Friday afternoon, July 8th. Very 
Rev. Fr. Rector was celebrant, as- 
sisted by V. Rev. Fr. Faustinus as 
Master of Ceremonies. The new^ 
novices are: 

Confr. Gerard of the Mother of Sor- 
rows (Donald Steckel-Detroit, Michi- 
gan). Confr. Peter of the Heart ol 
Mary (Lawrence Berendt-Detroit 
Michigan). Conf rater Alexander o1 
the Sorrowful Hearts (John Chandler 
Parsons, Kan.). Confr. Michae 
Joseph of the Sorrowful Mother ( Wm 
Stengel,-Louisville, Ky.). Confr. Nel 
son of Mary (Arlie Vaughn-Kansa 
City, Mo.). 

Brother Charles of the Infant o 
Prague (David Archuleta-Pueblc 
Colo.). 

July 9th, the Feast of our Lady o 
Holy Hope, was profession day for th 
three novices. Very Rev. Fr. Josepl 
1st Provincial Consultor received th 
temporary profession of Confr. Frar 
cis Martin (Jakicic), Confr. Car 
Anthony (Tehundfeld) and Confi 
Jude (Monteith). The newly pn 
fessed left Kansas on July 12. Cor 
fraters Francis Martin and Cai 
Anthony joined the Des Moines' sti 
dent body and Confrater Jude wer 
to Chicago to begin the study 
Theology. 

With much hard work, the novice 
have the spacious garden looking ver 
beautiful. 

On August 8th, Fr. Henry returne 
from his labors among the Indians 
North Dakota. At a novena in hone 
of St. Anne, at Belcourt, N. D. ove 
400 Indians received Holy Communio 
each morning. In appreciation of th 
spiritual happiness that Fr. Heni 



402 



had brought to them, the Indians made 
Him a Chippewa Chief. He bears the 
name Chief Menogishaguib which 
translated means Chief Happy Days. 
On his return journey, Fr. Henry was 
accompanied by a bouncing brown and 
white puppy that answers (some- 
times) to the name 'Micky'. Micky 
has made herself right at home here 
at the monastery. 

So much for the glad news from St. 
Paul, Kansas. What follows is an ac- 
count of the tragic death of Confrater 
Richard Osterberg by drowning in 
the muddy waters of the Neosho river 
on July 25th, at 3:50 p.m. 

About the middle of the afternoon 
on the feast of St. James, July 25, the 
novices and brothers, in the company 
of the Vice- Master, went to the Camp 
for a swim. The river was in a semi- 
flood condition — the water was up to 
the bottom of the stairs that lead 
down to the river. Brother John, 
Brother Thomas, Brother Charles and 
Confr. Alexander were already in 
swimming when Richard (known in 
religion as Confr. Gerald) came down 
to join them. As the river was swift, 
he went up the bank about 10 yards 
and started to swim to the opposite 
shore. Bro. John and Bro. Charles had 
meanwhile swum down the river and 
were again on the camp side of the 
river, about 50 feet east of the camp. 
When Confr. Gerald was about 10 
feet from the opposite shore, the cur- 
rent caught him and bore him into 
a small cove in the bank. He tried to 
get out of the water but the current 



was strong and he could not get any 
footing. As he called for help, the 
current caught him again and took 
him into the midstream. Fr. Rector, 
who had just stepped into the water, 
told Bro. Thomas and Confr. Alex- 
ander to go to his aid and they started 
down the river. Meanwhile, Bros. 
John and Charles had started across 
to Gerald who had gone down 4 or 5 
times. When Gerald was at the mouth 
of Flatrock Creek only his hands were 
visible. Bro. Charles reached him at 
this point and took hold of him and 
dove down to get a better hold. It 
was then that Gerald seized Bro. 
Charles and forced him to break his 
hold, as he was dragging Charles 
down with him. Charles came up for 
air, and waited for Gerald to come up 
again. Gerald did not come up again. 
The river was swift and muddy. 
When he did not appear again, we 
knew that he was gone. He had been 
given absolution while he was still 
struggling above water. 

Within a few minutes, news of the 
drowning spread over St. Paul. Boats 
were launched and the search for the 
body began. Later in the afternoon 
help came from Erie and in the even- 
ing a unit of Sea Scouts from the Par- 
sons Red Cross joined the searchers. 
A portable lighting outfit arrived from 
Parsons but about 10:30 it was de- 
cided to call off the search until the 
morning. 

On Tuesday morning about 40 per- 
sons made up the search-party. The 
river was combed with hooks; divers 



Profession Ceremony in St. Paul, Kansas, July 9, 1949. Standing: V. Rev. Fr, 
Faustinus, C.P., Master of Novices. Kneeling on Step: Confrater Francis 
Martin. Kneeling on Floor— Left to Right: Confrater Carl Anthony and Con- 
frater Jude. 



404 









Jj 



















scoured the river-bed, but the body 
was not found. Around noon, the 
Sheriff decided to use dynamite and 
so the river was blasted all afternoon. 
At 4:45 a crew was searching along 
the south shore of the river, about 
300 yards down from the camp. They 
discovered the body floating in the 
midst of some submerged branches. 
Thus ended the search for the body 
of the first drowning victim of our 
camp on the Neosho. 

Confrater Gerald of Mary, was not 
vested with his class-mates on July 
8th. He would have been vested in a 
few days, had he not been drowned. 
His body, vested in cassock and sur- 
plice was brought to the Monastery on 
Wednesday afternoon. On Thursday 
morning, V. Rev. Fr. Provincial sang 
a Solemn Requiem Mass, assisted by 
V. Rev. Fr. Rector as Deacon and Fr. 
Miles as Sub-deacon. Fr. Faustinus, 
Master of Novices, preached the 
sermon. The casket was draped with 
the American flag. Confr. Gerald 
served in the navy during the recent 
war. On Thursday afternoon, Fr. 
Provincial and Fr. Faustinus left for 
Los Angeles, California with the body. 
The funeral was held on Monday 
morning, Aug. 1st, in All Saints 
Church. Very Rev. Fr. Provincial was 
celebrant, V. Rev. Fr. Lambert was 
Deacon and Rev. Fr. Isidore was Sub- 
deacon. V. Rev. Fr. Faustinus de- 
livered the funeral sermon. Confr. 
Gerald's body was reposed in a vault, 
awaiting the time when the Passionist 
Fathers shall have their own cemetery 
in California. Then his body shall be 
laid to rest, in the shadow of a Pas- 



sionist Monastery, where Confrater 
Gerald desired so intensely to spend 
his life. 

Confrater Gerald is mourned by his 
Father and Mother, two sisters and a 
brother. He is likewise mourned by 
those of His religious brethren who 
knew him. He was a very holy boy 
and desired nothing more than to be- 
come a Passionist, in the full sense of 
the word. 

We recommend His soul to the 
prayers of our Religious and we beg a 
remembrance in your prayers for his 
bereaved family. 



MATER DOLOROSA RETREAT 

(Sierra Madre) 
The day of the corner stone laying 
for the new Retreat-House in May was 
a cold rainy day. So only the most 
enthusiastic of the retreat-workers 
came out for the event. But it was 
gratifying to see the great number of 
the diocesan clergy who turned out. 
Bishop McGucken spoke briefly from 
the special platform erected in front 
of the new chapel. Then Al Berghoff, 
national president of the Laymen's 
Retreat League, spoke enthusiastically 
of the connection between the retreat 
work and Catholic Action. The vested 
choir from St. John's Church, Hyde 
Park, provided the music for the af- 
fair. After the ceremony a banquet 
for the clergy was held in St. Rita's 
Hall. 



The second annual Fiesta, sponsored 
by the Mater Dolorosa Retreat 
League, was held on the monastery 



Left to Right: Cfrs. Joachim, Augustine Paul, Paul Mary, Bede, who made 
their Perpetual Profession in Des Moines, Iowa, July 9, 1949. 



406 



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407 



grounds the afternoon of June 19th. 
The area to the side of the present 
chapel had been levelled off and booths 
were erected there. A huge awning 
had been stretched the full length of 
the drive in back of the monastery, 
where around 4,200 meals were served 
that afternoon. Most of the expenses 
of the Fiesta had been underwritten 
by the Retreat League, so practically 
everything that was taken in in the 
afternoon of the event was clear 
profit. 



Prep-School Boys provided the choir 
for the Mass. 



As mentioned on another page the 
remains of the Postulant, Richard 
Osterberg, who met his tragic death in 
St. Paul, Kansas, were brought to 
California for burial. Most of the 
Community of Mater Dolorosa Retreat 
attended the Rosary and were at the 
Funeral Mass in All Saints Church, 




Richard Osterberg 

El Sereno; Father Provincial was 
celebrant with Fathers Rector and 
Isidore as Deacon and Subdeacon re- 
spectively. Father Faustinus' sermon 
on that occasion was particularly 
moving by reason of the delicate way 
he was able to weave into his talk the 
notes and poetry left by Richard. Our 

408 



If the Sacred Eloquence Class was< 
glad to get to California, they could 
scarcely have been happier than the 
present Community. It will be 
source of gratification to be able to 
have many of the liturgical functions! 
which had to be curtailed because of 
lack of ministers and a choir. Ana 
the fact that the Student Priests 
come with faculties for preaching and 
hearing Confessions will make their 
welcome assured also outside the 
monastery. At present the students 
are busy setting up their Sacred Elo- 
quence library in the Assembly room 
on the third floor. The former re- 
treatant library will serve as recrea- 
tion and class room. 



By the time this appears in print 
the new Retreat House will be ir 
regular use. Work on the grading 
and landscaping is being pushed along 
at the same time with the finishing 
of the interior. 



ST. PAUL OF THE CROSS RETREA1 

(Detroit) 

Like in most places so also hert 
there was a sort of summer lull. How 
ever, we cannot fail to express oui 
congratulations to our Father Godfrey 
on his work in the Summer School o: 
Catholic Action. The School was helc 
in Detroit from August 8th to 13th 
From reports we know that Father': 
classes were very well attended an< 
that he held the interest of his audit 
ence. His lectures were on Vocations 
both religious and the marriage state 



On August 6th the monastery 
opened its doors to the seventeen C.P. 
Preparatory Seminarians who were 
home on their vacation. Fr. Mel, the 
latest addition to the Community, con- 
ducted a Day of Recollection for them. 
Needless to add, we are certain all 
the boys drew great benefit therefrom 
and were again renewed in their re- 
solve to persevere in their vocation. 



A great material improvement was 
made on the property when both front 
and rear road to the monastery were 
paved with bituminous cement. 



ST. JOSEPH RETREAT 
(Birmingham) 
It finally came — a bolt of lightening 
;hat struck St. Joseph Retreat. And 
ve were beginning to think that we 
kere immune. It has been a little 
nore than a decade since the Pas- 
lionists took up residence in this 
welling and during that time the 
Sghtening flashes have danced all 
round us, often within a few yards 
nd too close for comfort, though the 
|ouse had never been hit, thanks to 
rod. Surely, Divine Providence was 
;ain extending a protective hand 
er us, for the damage though not 
light could have been far more severe, 
[he main force of the bolt was ab- 
irbed by the stone chimney, which 
jas partly shattered, and a number of 
lingles torn off the roof, but for- 
inately no fire started. Fire would 
deed have been a major hazard with 
e nearest Fire Department five and 
le-half miles away. It was likewise 
rovidential that the electrical charge 
om the lightening did not elect to 
avel down the chimney, for one of 



the Fathers was sitting directly across 
from the open fire-place when the 
lightening struck. He uttered a fer- 
vent "Deo Gratias" as did we all. No 
little credit for protection must be 
given to our Most Reverend Bishop 
Toolen who orders every year from 
June to November, the Oratio Impera- 
ta: "Ad repellendas tempestates", due 
to the severe storms that prevail in 
many sections of the Diocese during 
the mentioned months. 

Our summer schedule has kept us 
all busy, mostly with supply work and 
Retreats. Fr. Terence opened a Re- 
treat at Our Lady of Sorrows Con- 
vent, Birmingham for the Sisters of 
Mercy. On the order of a Lay Re- 
treat is the 15 day Novena in honor of 
our Lady's Assumption which Fr. 
Gregory opened August 1st at St. 
Mark's Church, strictly Italian. A 
notable feature of the "Novena" is 
not only the 15 days, but also the fact 
that it is conducted in the open air, 
weather permitting. 



CHRIST THE KING RETREAT 

(Sacramento) 
Although long past, we are never- 
theless happy to present views of the 
formal ground-breaking for the new 
Retreat House in Sacramento. Mem- 
bers of the Fourth Degree Knights of 
Columbus and Boy Scouts of Sacred 
Heart Parish formed an honor guard 
for the occasion. Musical selections 
were given by the girls' orchestra of 
St. Joseph's Academy. His Excellency 
Bishop Armstrong spoke of the spirit- 
ual advantages the project would 
bring to the faithful of the diocese. A 
layman, Mr. Harold Leavey, of Sacra- 
mento also spoke and stressed the fact 



409 



that the Retreat House would be open 
to all walks of life. We understand 
that now the construction is well 
under way and the hopes are that the 
dedication will take place around the 
same time that our new Retreat House 
in Sierra Madre is blessed. 



Frs. Angelo and Pius anticipated 
the Retreat House by conducting a 
Laymens Retreat from June 24 to 
26th at Camp Sacramento. The city 
granted the use of the camp before its 
official opening to the public, for the 
purpose of running the retreat. The 
camp is high in the mountains near 
the famed Lake Tahoe. 



Fr. Gabriel preached the sermon at 
the Holy Hour which concluded the 
Priests' Eucharistic Conference, June 
9th at St. Patrick's Home. 



Telephone number is changed to 
Hillcrest 5-1976. 



HOLY NAME RETREAT 

(Houston) 

On Mother's Day, May 8th, a "Ro- 
sary Path" was formally opened on 
the Retreat Grounds. The "Path" 
was also formally used again for the 
Novena before the Feast of the As- 
sumption. Every evening of the No- 
vena the Rosary was recited in pro- 
cession on the "Path", Father Conleth 
preached and the services closed with 
out-of-doors Benediction. On the first 
day of the Novena a beautiful 5 ft. 
2 in. high statue of the Blessed Mother 
was blessed ; it stands in the middle of 
the 20 acres of pines on the property 
and is a gift of Monsignor J. J. Rapp. 



OUR PARISHES 

HOLY FAMILY 

(Ensley) 
Our Graduation night, June 2n^ 
was a memorable event. Twenty-si 
8th Graders and fifteen Seniors in ov 
High School received their Certificate 
This joint graduation ceremon 
brought us the biggest crowd ever j 
pack Holy Family Church. Peop 
were in the aisles and looking in J 
the three doors, standing out as fi 
as the sidewalks around the churc 
Fr. Frederick A. Hughes, Principal 
John Carrol High School gave the a 
dress. We hope the day is not fc 
distant when the church will be th 
crowded for Sunday Masses. 

The Hospital Drive bogged down 
bit, but not because of lack of interei 
We have been stymied by the Coi 
munity Chest. A fine group of bui 



410 



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i 



Fr. Angelo, Superior of Christ the King Retreat, speaking on the occasion of 
fhe groundbreaking for the new building. 

lishop Armstrong breaking ground for the new Christ the King Retreat House, 
bacramento. Pictured : Left to right : V. Rev. Thomas Kirby, Fr. Angelo C P 
Architect Silvio Baravetto, Bishop Armstrong, V. Rev. Fr. Neil. 



\W%*1 




ness men under the leadership of Ex- 
Congressman John A. Newsome were 
just getting organized for a real con- 
certed movement to raise $275,000.00 
when the Community Chest stepped in 
and said the Drive could not be held 
until their drive in October was over. 
They maintain our soliciting would 
hurt them. As things stand now our 
Drive cannot function until next 
January. Pressure was put upon us 
at every step of the way to hold off. 
We believe racial and religious preju- 
dice has a great deal to do with the 
situation, but we feel that if our work 
be of God, nothing can stop us. 



Painting the High School inside and 
out has added to the looks of the place. 
Our Holy Name Men were very faith- 
ful in getting the work done. Right 
now we are getting the interior of the 
Grammar School and the exterior of 
the convent ready for a coat of paint. 
The convent is an eye-sore to the 
neighborhood on Pike Avenue which 
we hope to have corrected shortly. 
The metal roof must first be scraped 
of rust before we can put on the 
asphalt-aluminum coating. 

Another project which has taken a 
great deal of our time this summer 
is our new hall which is in the course 
of erection. We cannot show you a 
picture of it at this time, but by the 
next issue of THE PASSIONIST we 
will show you a picture of the building 
completed. The new Hall is a Butler 
type building, all aluminum, 40 feet 
wide by 100 feet long, 21 feet high. 
The floor is of concrete with a three 
foot wall from ground level made of 
concrete block filled. It was necessary 
to build on a three-foot wall to obvi- 



ate flooding. The Hall will give us 
a variety of uses: basketball, tennis, 
ping-pong, badminton, dancing, shows, 
talkies, dinners, meetings, boxing et 
similia. We plan on using the Federal 
Aid Lunch Program if we can get the| 
equipment needed. A balanced meal 
for these youngsters should help de- 
velop them physically. Our visual aid 
program can now function to a great- 
er extent and inform the students of 
different food values and perhaps per- 
suade them to eat more intelligently 
and therefore more beneficially. 



ST. MARY 

(Fairfield) 
The new school, dedicated last 
March, will be put to good use this) 
school year. The number of children 
attending breaks the record of for- 
mer years. This year the fifth gradt 
was started. There are five Sisters 
teaching in the school now. 



ST. GEMMA 

(Detroit) 
The Parish Carnival held on Jun 
17, 18 and 19, netted a profit o 
$5,010.00. We had hoped for a tei 
thousand dollar profit this year as ou 
main prize was a 1949 Pontiac Si? 
But the Ford strike came in the midsl 
of selling chances and the Carniva 
itself. As we are a young parisl 
our initial expenses are high, since w 
need equipment. The parish i: 
general was very well pleased with th 
amount realized in spite of the man 
difficulties we experienced. 



Again this year we had a religiou 
Vacation School for the children wh 
attend the Public Schools. The* 



412 



youngsters receive instructions but 
once a week during the school-year, 
and our Vacation School is necessary 
to supplement the work done through 
the school months. It is needed here 
to keep the children from attending 
the Bible Classes in the nearby Memo- 
rial Christian Church. Two Domini- 
can Sisters from St. Alphonsus, Dear- 
born, very graciously gave their time 
each morning for a period of three 
weeks. For the most part our seventy- 
eight children were present each day. 
We finished the School with a picnic 
— Cokes, Ice cream, Cake and "tummy 
aches". 



The architects completed the plans 
for our school and hall, and these 
plans were immediately submitted to 
the Archdiocesan Building Commis- 
sion. We received full approval and 
were given permission to seek bids. 
At the present writing (Aug. 12) the 
bids are being sent in by General Con- 
tractors who are interested. We hope 
to have all the bids in by the end of 
August and start building the first 



week in September. The ceremony of 
Breaking Ground was held at 3 P.M. 
Sunday, August 14th with Msgr. 
Walter Harding officiating. We are 
promising THE PASSIONIST a pic- 
ture or two of the school for the next 
issue. 



HOLY SPIRIT PROVINCE 

(Australia) 
Twenty years of our life as a Pro- 
vince have passed since we have had 
the privilege and honor of receiving 
one of our Fathers General. The 
difficulties inseparable from the recent 
war made a lapse of ten years since 
a member of the General Curia has 
been able to come to help us. The 
visit of Most Reverend Father 
General, early this year, was there- 
fore a memorable event and all shall 
long remember the brief stay of Fr. 
General with us. Father General ad- 
dressed the Religious on the Spirit of 
Our Holy Founder and our Congrega- 
tion. His words were most inspiring 
and encouraging. Probably none ap- 
preciated the many gifts of Father 



mm m * ma Mnlfl HHwira ! ■ |B Rp : ] 

Mr* ,^^fi ^ Jm 



St. Mary Church, Fairfield, Alabama. 



413 



General, his guidance and his deep in- 
terest in the Province of the Holy 
Ghost more than the Capitular Fa- 
thers during the Chapter. 

July 1st was Ordination day for the 
Province. Four young men were 
raised to the Holy Priesthood and will 
take their Sacred Eloquence course in 
the Retreat at Glen Osmund. One of 
the Fathers, who has finished his 
Sacred E'oquence course is scheduled 
to continue his studies in Philosophy 
in Rome. 



the Ordinary, Bishop Lemmens per- 
formed the ceremony, Father Vincent, 
Master of Novices of the Province 
preached the sermon and the Pas- 
sionist Students took care of the sing- 
ing and music. The ceremony was 
based on our Vestition ceremony as 
given in our Ritual. 



MOTHER OF HOLY HOPE 
PROVINCE 

(Holland) 
The 25th anniversary of the found- 
ing of the Province was celebrated on 
April 20th with a three-hours adora- 
tion of the Solemnly Exposed Blessed 
Sacrament in the choir, and on April 
21st a Solemn High Mass in the Choir 
(at Mook) celebrated by the Very 
Reverend Father Consultor General, 
Fr. Vincent, assisted by the Father 
Provincial and the Father Rector, of 
Mook. The Provincial Chapter opened 
on April 22nd. Among other things, 
we have heard, that the Chapter grap- 
pled with the "game" question and 
also the smoking proposition. In both 
these questions, according to our stan- 
dards, a rather severe stand was 
taken. 



July 9th, Feast of our Lady of Holy 
Hope, was also a big day for the Fa- 
thers of the Province, especially those 
in Mook: the first five Postulants of 
the Missionary Sisters of St. Gemma 
(founded by the Fathers of the Pro- 
vince) took their Holy Habit. Father 
Provincial celebrated the High Mass, 



July 10th a new organ was blessed i 
in the C.P. church at Mook and played i 
for the occasion by Maestro Abrahami 
Marti j in, a brother of Fr. Ambrose, 
Vicar of the Retreat. 



Two of the Fathers Doctorated ins 
July, one in Theology the other in 
Philosophy; the latter made a Summa 
cum Laude on "cognitio intellectualisl 
rei materialis singularis secundum 
doctrinum S Thomae". 



There is also a sad note in the Pro- 
vince, especially at Mook, where there 
are Fathers and Brothers on a forced 
leave of absence from Bulgaria. One 
of these Fathers worked in Bulgaria 
for 40 years, another 25 and others 
13. At present all the Dutch Fathers 
and Brothers have left Bulgaria. II 
is hard for them to be thrown out oi 
the work they loved so much. 



ST. PATRICK PROVINCE 

(Ireland) 

On Good Friday, 1948, St. John' 
statue of the out-door Calvary grour 
on Mt. Argus fell to pieces. On ex 
amination it was discovered that th» 
other figures were perishing and th< 
canopy with its supporting pillars wa' 
badly affected by dry rot. It was witH 
much regret that the decision wa! 



414 



made to remove the Calvary. Erected 
in 1892 it was a link with the past 
and was loved by all who knew the 
Mount Argus of other days. The re- 
grets, however, were tempered with 
the generosity of the people of Mount 
Argus towards the erection of a new 
Calvary. On July 3rd, 1949 the new 
Calvary was blessed in connection 



with an elaborate ceremony which 
closed with solemn benediction. 

July 4th was the opening day of a 
Tridiuum in the C.P. Church of Mount 
Argus in honor of Blessed Mary 
Goretti. The Triduum closed on the 
Feast, July 6th with the blessing and 
opening of a shrine to Blessed Mary 
Goretti. 



PASSIONIST NUNS 



CONVENT OF OUR LADY 
OF SORROWS 

(Pittsburgh) 

In a recent election held in the Con- 
vent Mother Mary Elisabeth, C.P. was 
elected Superior for the coming term. 
She succeeds Mother Mary Teresa, 
C.P., who is one of the original Nuns 
that came to the USA in 1910. We 
congratulate the Community on their 
choice and wish to assure Mother 
Elisabeth of our prayers to help her 
preserve the Spirit of our Holy 
Founder and to mother the little flock 
entrusted to her care. 

On September 8th Consorella Mary 
Vincent of the Mother of God took her 
perpetual vows. May our Holy Fa- 
ther St. Paul of the Cross bless and 
strengthen her to persevere to the 
end! 

From Argentina a letter tells us 
that Sister Cecilia Dolan, C.P., Pas- 
sionist Sister, joined the Passionist 
Nuns at Pittsburgh. In part the letter 
says: "Young, enterprising, a great 
favorite with the pupils at Michael 
Ham, where she was Technical Direc- 
tor it has been a stupendous instance 
of a soul hungering for a closer union 
with Jesus. She is a sister of two 



Passionists down here and first cousin 
of two others. ..." 



ST. GABRIEL CONVENT 

(Scranton) 
August 13th was election day in St. 
Gabriel's. Mother Catharine in her 
own words wished to "sink down to be 
hidden and lost forever in the Heart 
of Jesus". Her wish and prayer was 
fulfilled. The result of the elections 
is as follows: Superior, Reverend 
Mother Vincent Mary, C.P.; Vicar, 
Mother M. Hyacinth, C.P.; 1st Coun- 
sellor, Mother M. Paul, C.P.; 2nd 
Counsellor, Mother M. Anna, C.P.; 
Mistress of Novices, Mother Rose 
Mary, C.P. We wish all God's 
guidance and strength. 



ST. JOSEPH MONASTERY 

(Owensboro) 
August 5th, Feast of Our Lady of 
the Snow and First Friday of the 
month, was another day of special joy 
and grace in the history of St. 
Joseph's: The Profession of Sister 
Rose Mary of the Sacred Heart, the 
second profession in the Community. 
Sister Rose Mary is a Lay Sister; she 
chose this state, immediately after 



415 



graduating from High School, in order 
that she might the better follow the 
example of our Blessed Mother in 
caring for the Holy Family. Since 
Most Reverend Bishop Cotton was ab- 
sent, Fr. Braun, Pastor of Sts. Joseph 
and Paul in Owensboro, was delegated 
to receive the profession. Now our 
good Nuns are looking forward to an- 
other Vestition on September 28th. 
All in all there are 11 members in St. 
Joseph's now. 

The Nuns, as well as all of us, were 
very pleased to hear that His Excel- 
lency Bishop Cotton, during his "ad 
limina" made it a point one day to 
offer the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass 
at the tomb of our Holy Founder. 

From Mamers the news came of the 
death of Sister Mary of Calvary. 
Sister Mary of Calvary was one of 
the cooks of the Community. The 
Community is very poor and since her 
death the Nuns have received several 
donations, e.g., 3 tons of charcoal 
which seem to indicate that Sister 
Mary is trying from heaven to make 
the burden of her successor a bit 
lighter. Another death notice came 
from Sables: Sister Mary Genevieve. 
RIP. 

The Nuns in Europe often mention 
that they can use cancelled American 
Stamps to help their financial situa- 
tion a bit. The Nuns in Owensboro 
will be glad to forward any you send 
to them. 



CONVENT OF THE SACRED 
PASSION 

(Erlanger) 

The Feast of our Lady's Assump- 
tion was a day of great rejoicing for 

416 



us: Our first Novice in Marydale, 
Consorella Mary Catharine, r pro- 
nounced her vows. Due to the absence 
of our Most Reverend Bishop, who is 
on his "ad limina visit", our devoted 
Father Rector, Very Reverend Father i 
Valentine, C.P., was delegated to of- 
ficiate. Needless to add we were very 
happy over the appointment. Rever- 
end Father Carl, C.P., delivered a very 
inspiring sermon, in which he clearly 
outlined the special characteristics 
that distinguish our Passionist voca- 
tion, according to the lofty ideals of 
our Holy Founder. Rev. Fr. Charles, 
C.P., our organist for all our "special" 
occasions, was faithfully and artisti- 
cally at his post, and took good care 
of the musical end of the program. 
We know our newly professed will be 
grateful for the prayers of the Fa- 
thers and Brothers of the Province, 
that the Lord will lead her through to 
the great day of her final profession. 



IMMACULATE CONCEPTION 
CONVENT 

(St. Louis) 

Not too long ago our Passionist 
Nuns in St. Louis published a voca- 
tional pamphlet entitled "Beneath the 
Cross", A sketch of the origin, life 
and aims of the Passionist Nuns. Iti 
contains pictures of the Founders, St. 1 
Paul of the Cross and Mother Mary 
Crucified of Jesus. The booklet is 
nicely written and gives a clear idea- 
to the Lay-woman who is interested' 
what the life of the Nuns amounts to. 
We hope that the distribution of thei 
work will bring vocations to the Mon- 
astery. 



PASSIONIST SISTERS 



In the latter part of the school year, 
events crowded upon each other. The 
first Sunday in May brought not only 
the Confirmation, given for the first 
time in this parish by His Excellency, 
Most Reverend Russell J. McVinney, 
but the added thrill of a First Solemn 
High Mass celebrated by Rev. Benet 
Kelley, C.P., one of our former pupils. 
The following Sunday, May 15, saw 
another young Passionist, Father Co- 
lumkille Regan, celebrate his First 
Solemn Mass in the Assumption 
Church. A month later another young 
man, Father Francis V. De Lellis, was 
ordained, listing the third of former 
students among the priesthood. The 
Sisters felt that God was repaying 
them in His own generous way for 
their labors among the children. 

The annual May Procession was as 
successful as usual. Led by the La 
Salle Band, the children in colorful at- 
tire marched from the School to the 
Church, where large crowds were in 
attendance. Graduation exercises held 
in the Church on the evening of 
Corpus Christi, brought the school 
year to a close. 

After a rest of a brief week most of 
the Community were again at work, 
some studying at Catholic Teachers' 
College, or at the Providence College 
School of Theology; others busily en- 
gaged at the Religious Vacation 



Schools held at the Assumption School, 
and at St. Bernard's, Wickford, St. 
Francis', Wakefield, St. Philomena's, 
Narragansett. 

The first week in August will find 
groups of sisters repairing to Mount 
St. Joseph, Bristol for a well-earned 
relaxation of a few weeks before 
starting a new school year in Septem- 
ber. 

For several months, we have been 
expecting the arrival of a little band 
of our Sisters from England, and on 
Whit Sunday, Sisters M. Annunciata 
and Thomasina from the English pro- 
vinces, and Sisters Helena Mary and 
Kenneth from the Irish Provinces ar- 
rived in New York on the Parthia. 
They are all happy and settled down 
in the land of their adoption. 

Mother M. Concepta, Novice Mis- 
tress, with Sisters de Chantal, Fran- 
cesca and Dominica sailed on the Brit- 
tanica, June 15 to visit our convents 
in Great Britain and Ireland, and all 
their relatives. All were in high 
spirits at the prospect of such joyous 
meetings after a lapse of over twenty 
years. Letters received from them 
since, reveal that their anticipations of 
a happy visit have been fully realized. 
They are loud in praise of the spirit 
of faith they see everywhere in dear 
old Ireland. 



117 




na 



With this issue of THE PAS- 
SIONIST we are sending you a copy 
of "Masses of the Passion". We need 
therefore and no further words on the 
neat work and on the practical aspect 
of the booklet. The printing was done 
by the printer of THE PASSIONIST, 
The Abbey Press and the compilation 
by Cfr. Paul Mary, C.P., Immaculate 
Conception Retreat, Chicago, 111. 
Copies obtainable from: THE PAS- 
SIONIST, 1924 Newburg Rd., Louis- 
ville 5, Kentucky, USA. 



"The Challenge of Fatima" by our 
Father Raphael, C.P., can now be ob- 
tained from "The Grail Office, St. 
Meinrad, Ind. It was released in the 
beginning of August and has already 
been sold to several thousands of 
people. Fr. Raphael has caught the 
spirit and importance of the Fatima 
Revelations and has put them very 
appealingly into print. They sell for 
25tf a copy with reduction for orders 
in numbers. Help spread the message 
of the Blessed Mother by procuring 
and distributing this excellent, timely 
and, I might say, necessary booklet. 



In reading the August-September 
issue of the "Revue de la Passion" 
published by our Brethren in France 
we were happy to find out that formal 




approval of the last necessary 
miracles for the Canonization of Bl. 
Mary Goretti was given in a General 
Meeting of the Sacred Congregation 
of Rites in the presence of the Holy 
Father. This places the proceedings 
for the Canonization of Blessed Mary 
Goretti on the same level with those 
of Blessed Vincent Mary Strambi. 
Both will in all probability be canon- 
ized in the Holy Year. Several times 
printed statements have been made to 
the effect that if Bl. Mary be canon- 
ized next year, it will be the most 
rapid case of canonization in the his- 
tory of the Church. Just what is 
meant by this is not clear; but if it 
means that the fewest years elapsed 
since the death of the individual the 
statement as it stands is not true. In 
the Martyrology we read that Pope 
Gregory IX canonized St. Anthony of 
Padua in less than a year after death. 
In our own St. Gemma is canonized 
and died in 1903 whereas Bl. Mary 
Goretti died in 1902. 



St. Meinrad Abbey Press has given 
word that the life of Bl. Mary Goretti, 
"Blood-Stained Lily", written by our 
Father Alfred McConastair, C.P., is 
just about to be released. Order your 
copies from: The Grail, St. Meinrad, 
Indiana. 



418 



The Confraternity of the Passion, 
West Springfield, Mass., has a very 
artistic leaflet with picture, prayer 
and eulogy of Bl. Mary Goretti. 

Negotiations for the printing of the 
C.P. Proprium of the Breviary with 
the old version of the Psalms by the 
Montreal Firm have fallen through. 
A new management has taken over the 
printing establishment and it claims 
that it could not go through with the 
printing of our Proprium on account 
of the high cost. However, an order 
has been placed with Pustet Company 
who, in spite of declarations to the 
contrary, now offer Breviaries with 
the old Psalter. 



Through the charity of V. Rev. Fr. 
Malcolm recently an oft-mooted ques- 
tion was privately but authoritatively 
settled. We quote the letter in part: 
"I must answer your question about 
missionaries giving the papal blessing 
privately to people who have made a 
retreat but cannot be present at the 
closing. The answer is NO. I took 
it up with Fr. Titus who has his 
fingers on sources and he says the 
faculty is given to the missionary to 
impart it just once in each retreat or 
mission — no more. . . " 



The Litany of All Saints with the 
following prayers in the Breviary are 
a part of the obligation of the Office 
on the specified days. Consequently 
any one who legitimately uses the 



privilege of reciting the small office 
)f the Passion or of the Bl. Mother 
instead of the large office, or according 
to privilege no. 92 recites the beads 
is not obliged to recite the Litany and 
following prayers. 



According to instructions contained 
in one of our Most Reverend Father 
General's recent communications, our 
evening community Rosary on Satur- 
days shall be offered in honor of the 
"Immaculate Heart of Mary, Queen 
of Peace and of our Congregation, 
that by her maternal and loving inter- 
cession, dissensions may be put aside, 
charity be reintegrated and a true 
and lasting peace be the portion of 
the whole world." In consequence of 
this instruction it would seem that on 
Saturday evenings the Rosary should 
not be offered for any other intention 
by the Community, e.g., as a Suffrage 
for the deceased or for rain etc. 

What is happening to our Retreat 
in Bethany, Palestine, we do not know. 
It is quite some time since we have 
heard. The last "PASSIONIST" 
failed to pass the postal frontier of 
Israel. 



The latest issue of the Acta Con- 
gregations takes up again (after an 
interruption of 20 years) the publish- 
ing of the circular letters of our 
Generals. The respective issue con- 
tains letters of the second and third 
Generals. 



419 



WORKS OF MINISTRY 

(The following enumeration does not pretend to be complete, but all is recorded that has come* 
to our notice and has not been published in a former issue of THE PASSIONIST) . 



April 10-17 
May 15-22 
May 22-29 
May 29-June 5 



June 5-12 
June 5-19 
June 19-28 
July 5-17 
July 10-17 
July 23-31 

May 9-13 

June 

June 5-10 

June 12-17 
June 12-18 
June 13-16 
June 13-18 
June 20-25 
August 7-13 
August 16-19 
August 22-26 

April 25-May 4 
May 7-16 
May 16-26 
May 24-June 1 
May 28-June 6 
May 27-June 5 
May 30-June 6 
June 1-5 
June 1-10 

June 2-11 
June 3-12 

June 4-11 

June 18 

June 9-16 

June 9-18 

June 10-19 

June 11-16 

June 11-17 

June 11-18 

June 11-19 



San Diego, Calif. 
Artesia, Calif. 
Norwalk, Calif. 
San Ysidro, Calif. 
New Orleans, La. 

Orange, Calif. 
Highlands, Texas 
Clementsville, Ky. 
Paintsville, Ky. 
Marksville, Minn. 
McEwen, Tenn. 



MISSIONS 

Lady of S. Heart 

Holy Family (San) 

Lady of G. Counsel (Span) 

Mt. Carmel 

St. Raymund 

Holy Family (Span) 

Sacred Heart 

Street Preaching 

St. Michael Mission Center 

Sacred Heart 

St. Patrick & Missions 



CLERGY RETREATS 



Gethsemani, Ky. 
San Fernando, Calif. 
Chicago, 111. 
Mobile, Alabama. 
St.. Meinrad, Ind. 
Lakewood, N. J. 
Des Moines, Iowa. 
St. Charles, 111. 
St. Charles, 111. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Richardton, N. Dak. 
Richardton, N. Dak. 

RETREATS FOR 

Des Moines, la. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Independence, Kansas 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Bellaire, Texas 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Victoria, Texas 
Cincinnati, O. 
Paris, Texas 
El Paso, Texas 
Fort Scott, Ks. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Joplin, Mo. 
Peoria, 111. 

Birmingham, Alabama 
Bardstown, Ky. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
St. Martin, Ohio 
Duluth, Minn. 
Mankota, Minn. 
Maple Mount, Ky. 
Burbank, Calif. 
Montebcllo. Calif. 



Owensboro Clergy 
Oblate Fathers 
Servite Fathers 
Dioec. Clergy 
Benedictine Frs. 
Maryknoll Frs. 
Diocesan Clergy 
Servite Fathers 
Servite Fathers 
Servite Fathers 
Bismark Clergy 
Benedictine Frs. 

BROTHERS & SISTERS 



Sisters of Mercy 

Sisters of Mercy 

Carmelite Sisters 

Srs. Incarnate Word 

Srs. of Social Service 

Srs. Incarnate Word 

Srs. of Good Shepherd 

Srs. Incarnate Word 

Srs. of Loretto 

Srs. of Mercy 

Srs. of Mercy 

Srs. of Mercy 

Srs. of St. Francis 

Srs. of Bl. Sacrament 

Xaverian Bros. 

Christian Bros. 

Ursulines 

Srs. of St. Benedict 

Sis. of Notre Dame 

Ursulines 

Holy Cross Bros. 

Christian Bros. 



Fr. Philip 
Fr. Edward 
Fr. Edward 
Fr. Dun stan 
Frs. Robert & 

George 
Fr. Edward 
Fr. Henry 
Fr. Cornelius 
Fr. Cornelius 
Fr. Henry 
Fr. Cornelius 



Fr. Paschal 

Fr. Damian 

Fr. Timothy 

Fr. Roland 

Fr. Paschal 

Fr. Emmanuel 

Fr. Edwin 

Fr. Marion 

Fr. Marion 

Fr. Marion 

Fr. Emmanuel 

Fr. Emmanuel 



Fr. Brendan 

Fr. Henry 
Fr. Brendan 
Fr. Stanislaus 
Fr. Jerome 
Fr. Bertrand 
Fr. Anthony 
Fr. John A el red 
Fr. Agatho 
Fr. Ronan 
Fr. Matthias 
Fr. Martin 
Fr. Hilary 
Fr. Cornelius 
Fr. Thomas 
Fr! Robert 
Fr. Joyce 
Fr. Louis 
Fr. Fidel is 
Fr. Kevin 
Fr. Philip 
Fr. Jerome 



420 



June 


12-19 


Ventura, Calif. 


Holy Cross Srs. 


Fr. 


Basil 






St. Ignace, Mich. 


Ursulines 


Fr. 


Vincent 


June 


12-21 


Des Plaines, 111. 


Srs. of Charity of Prov. 


Fr. 


Alexis 


June 


13-19 


Dayton, Ohio 


Srs. of Precious Blood 


Fr. 


Vincent M. 


June 


13-^0 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Sisters of St. Joseph 


Fr. 


Boniface 


June 


13-22 


Ottawa, 111. 


Srs. of Mercy 


Fr. 


Egbert 






Chicago, 111. 


Srs. of Mercy 


Fr. 


Matthew 






Chicago, HI. 


Srs. * Mercy 


Fr. 


Gilbert 






Chicago, 111. 


Srs. of Mercy 


Fr. 


Cyril Mary 


June 


13-i.Z 


Chicago, 111. 


Mercy Srs. 


Fr. 


Justin 


June 


15-24 


Chicago, 111. 


Sisters of Notre Dame 


Fr. 


Valentine 


June 


16-23 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Sisters ofg St. Vincent Orph. 


Fr. 


Emmanuel 


June 


16-25 


Nazareth, Ky. 


Charity Srs. 


Fr. 


Arnold 


June 


20-23 


Chicago, 111. 


Lt.. Srs. of the Poor 


Fr. 


Kevin 


June 


20-24 


Mobile, Alabama 


Lt. Srs. of Poor 


Fr. 


Anthony 






St. Louis, Mo. 


Lt. Srs. of Poor 


Fr. 


Ernest 


June 


21-27 


Chicago, 111. 


S. Srs. of Notre Dame 


Fr. 


Joyce 


June 


21-28 


St. Paul, Minn. 


Lt. Srs. of Poor 


Fr. 


Kenneth 


June 


21-30 


Mt. St. Joseph, O. 


Srs. of Charity 


Frs 


. Paschal & 










Benet 


July 


3-10 


Concordia, Ks. 


Srs. of St. Joseph 


Fr. 


George 


July 


13-22 


Cleveland, O. 


Good Shepherd Srs. 


Fr. 


Anthony 


July 


19-21 


Omaha, Nebr. 


Magdalens 


Fr. 


Louis 


July 


16-23 


San Antonio, Texas 


Srs. of Div. Providence 


Fr. 


Stanislaus 


July 


17-24 


San Antonio, Texas 


Srs. of Incarnate Word 


Fr. 


John Aelred 


My 


17-24 


San Antonio, Texas 


Srs. of Incarnate Word 


Fr. 


Conleth 


July 


21-27 


Austin, Texas 


Miss. Srs. of Immac. Cone. 


Fr. 


Agatho 


Tuly 23-29 


Mankato, Minn. 


Sch. Srs. of Notre Dame 


Fr. 


Fidelis 


July 26-Aug. 2 


St. Paul, Minn. 


St. Dominic Srs. 












Relief of Cancer 


Fr. 


Arnold 


fuly 


27-Ang. 5 


Santa Fe, N. Mex. 


Srs. of Lady of Victory 


Fr. 


Bertrand 






New Orleans, La. 


Immac. Cone. Srs. 


Fr. 


Anthony 


Tuly 30-Aug. 5 


Normandy, Mo. 


Srs. of St. Francis of 












St. George 


Fr. 


Justin 


fuly 


31-Aug. 7 


Detroit, Mich. 


Srs. of Christ. Charity 


Fr. 


Alexis 






New Orleans, La. 


Srs. of Christ. Charity 


Fr. 


Camillus 






Cleveland, O. 


Ursulines 


Fr. 


Kevin 


lug. 


1-6 


Corona, Calif. 


Franciscan Sisters 


Fr. 


Jerome 


V.UK. 


1-10 


Ferdinand, Ind. 


Benedictine Srs. 


Fr. 


Boniface 


lug. 


4-13 


Chicago, 111. 


Srs. of Providence 


Fr. 


Ronan 






Hamilton, O. 


Srs. of Notre Dame 


Fr. 


Matthias 


tug. 


5-14 


Dayton, O. 


Srs. of Precious Blood 


Fr. 


Vincent Mary 


Lug. 


5-14 


Lemont, 111. 


Srs. of St. Fr. of Xst the King Ft. 


Ernest 


Lug. 


6-15 


Lafayette, La. 


Bros, of Christ. Schools 


Fr. 


Paschal 






Cincinnati, O. 


Ursulines 


Fr. 


Kenneth 






Des, Moines, Iowa 


Mercy Srs. 


Fr. 


Joseph 






San Antonio, Texas 


Incarnate Word Srs. 


Fr. 


Stanislaus 






Peoria, 111. 


Srs. of &t. Francis 


Fr. 


James 






Vicksburg, Miss. 


Srs. of Mercy 


Fr. 


Anthony 






Chicago, 111. 


Srs. of Bl. Sacrament 


Fr. 


Egbert 






Sabta Fe, N. Mex. 


Srs. of Bl. Sacrament 


Fr. 


Bertrand 






Louisville, Ky. 


Srs. of Mercy 


Fr. 


Benet 






St. Michael, Ariz. 


Srs. of Bl. Sacrament 


Fr. 


John Aelred 


,'UR. 


7-14 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Zelatrices of S. Heart 


Fr. 


Arnold 


L«g. 


7-15 


Birmingham, Ala. 


Sis. of Mercy 


Fr. 


Terence 



421 



Aug. 


7-14 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


Aug. 


8-15 


Pomona, Calif. 
Ogden, Utah 


Aug. 


13-22 


Cincinnati, 0. 


Aug. 


15-23 


Oklahoma City, Okla 


Aug. 


19-28 


Detroit, Mich. 


Aug. 


19-25 


Donaldson, Ind. 


Aug. 


21-31 


Sioux City, Iowa 


Aug. 


30-Sept. 8 


Cleveland, Ohio 
St. Louis, Mo. 



Srs. of Social Service 
Felician Srs. 
Srs. of Holy Cross 
Good Shepherd Srs. 
Carmelite Srs. 
Good Shepherd Srs. 
Poor Handmaids 
Benedictine Srs. 
Good Shepherd Srs. 
Sis. of St. Mary 



Fr. Jerome 

Fr. Basil 

Fr. Philip 

Fr. Bernard 

Fr. Kevin 

Fr. Anthony 

Fr. Germain 

Fr. Elmer 

Fr. Anthony 

Fr. Matthias 



LAY RETREATS 



April 20-22 
May 4-8 
May 9-13 
May 13-15 
May 20-22 
May 27-29 

June 1-3 

June 3-12 

June 5-8 

June 17-19 

June 17-21 
June 24-26 
July 8-10 
July 14-17 
July 21-24 
July 29-3«l 
Aug. 5-7 
Aug. 10-21 
Aug. 26-28 
Sept. 2-4 



Ft. Scott, Kansas 
Van Nuys, Calif. 
Stewart, Minn. 
Owensboro, Ky. 
Alhambra, Calif. 
Ainambra, Calif. 
Owensboro, Ky. 
Hutchinson, Ks. 
Leland Lodge, Mich. 
Eiianger, ky. 
Austin, Texas 
Alhambra, Calif. 
Marshall, Texas 
Owensboro, Ky. 
Owensboro, Ky. 
Galveston, Texas 
San Antonio, Texas 
Covington, Ky. 
Owensboro, Ky. 
Normandy, Mo. 
Owensboro, Ky. 
Owensboro, Ky. 



Nurses 

Nazareth Retreat H. 

Parish Retreat 

At. CP. Nuns 

S. Heart Retreat H. 

S. Heart Retreat H. 

At. CP. Nuns 

State Reform Sch. 

Retreat House 

At. CP. Nuns 

N.C.C.W. 

S. Heart Retreat H. 

St. Joseph Parish 

At. CP. Nuns 

At. CP. Nuns 

N.C.C.W. 

Cath. Ladies 

Sodality Union 

At. CP. Nuns 

Mt. Providence (Girls) 

At. CP. Nuns 

At. CP. Nuns 



Fr. Henry 
Fr. Philip 
Fr. Henry 
Fr. Alfred S. 
Fr. Jerome 
Fr. Alfred Mc. 
Fr. Alfred S. 
Fr. Henry 
Fr. Kenneth 
Fr. Walter 
Fr. John Aelred 
Fr. Alfred Mc. 
Fr. Stanislaus 
Fr. Alfred S. 
Fr. Alfred S. 
Fr. Conleth 
Fr. Conleth 
Fr. Malachy 
Fr. Alfred S. 
Fr. Walter 
Fr. Alfred S. 
Fr. Alfred S. 



June 16-24 

June 24-July 3 
July 17-25 
July 17-26 



July 23-31 
Aug. 1-15 
Aug. 20-28 



Houston, Texas 
Chicago, 111. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Chicago, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 
Covington, Ky. 
St. Anne, 111. 
Belcourt, N. Dak. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Chicago, 111. 



NOVENAS 

Sacred Heart 

St. Jerome 

Precious Blood 

St. Mel. 

St. Louis of France 

St. Anne 

St. Anne 

St. Anne 

St. Mark 

St. Francis of Assisi 



Fr. Bertrand 

Fr. Timothy 

Fr. Jerome 

Fr. Alban 

Fr. Timothy 

Fr. Valentine 

Fr. Walter 

Fr. Henry 

Fr. Gregory Mc. ' 

Fr. Alban 



May 22-21 
June 5-7 

June ii'-i I 
.July 17-19 



Humboldt. Ks. 
Madison. Ind. 
Uniontown, Ky. 
Howardstovvn, Ky. 
ElSereno, Calif. 



FORTY HOURS 

St. Joseph 

St. Michael 

Si. Amies 

Si. ..nne 

All Saints 



Joel 

Gilbert 
Flannon 
Flannon 
Basil 



422 



toig. 7-9 


Cecilia, Ky. 


St. Ambrose 


Fr. 


John Baptist 




Payneville, Ky. 


St. Mary Magdel. 


Fr. 


Forrest 


\uk. ^i-23 


Clementsville, Ky. 


St. Bernard 


Fr. 


Gordian 


i\lg. 28-30 


Calvary, Ky. 


H. Name of Mary 


Fr. 


Forrest 




RECOLLECTION DAYS 






day 2(! 


Siena Madre, Calif. 


8th Grade Graduates 


Fr. 


Jerome 


une 


Duarte, Calif. 


S. Teresita Sanitarium 


Fr. 


Alfred Mc. 




Highland Park, Calif. 


Columba Squires 


Fr. 


Jerome 


une 26 


St. Paul Kansas 


Ladies of Parish 


Fr. 


Robert B. 




". . . Pray to Mary for me also and for the present needs of Holy 
hurch and for all the world, and for the souls in Purgatory, especially 
lose for whom we are bound to pray; for this least Congregation, that 
le will protect it and provide it with holy workers, because she is the 
reasurer of graces, and His Divine Majesty wishes that they pass through 
er hands." 

St. Paul of the Cross 



V2:\ 



WHO IS WHO AND WHERE 

HOLY CROSS PROVINCE, SEPTEMBER 1949 



ROME 


Brothers 


Bartholomew 


Regis 22 


Ignatius B 36 


Malcolm 1 
John Baptist 34 


Joseph 21 


Roger 39, 41 


David 23 


Ronan 


Leo 23, 24 


John 47 


ST. PAUL 


Thomas More [ 


Forrest 34 


CINCINNATI 


Subdeacons 


Robert 5 


Frederick 37 
Cronan 






Carrol 


Faustinus 6 


Stephen 38 
Noel 

Students 

Barry 


CHICAGO 

James Patrick 2 
Joseph 3 
Neil 4 


Valentine 5 
Colum 7 
Aurelius 
Alphonsus 


Randal 
Firmian 
Clyde 
Loran 


Egbert 7 
Matthew M 
Hyacinth 
Julian 


Herman 5 


Edwin 
Raphael 


Simon 


Edward 
George 


J. Francis 
Marvin 


Kilian 7 
Cyril 

Augustine 
David K 


Bernard 


In Minor Ord. 


Christopher 9 


Victor 


Arthur 9 
Ferdinand 


Melvin 
Emmet 


Brendan 
Cyprian F. 9 


Gail 
Aquinas 


Vincent X 


Sylvester 


Kent 


Henry 


J. Gabriel 


Norbert 
Alban 
Richard 9 
Matthias 


Nicholas 15 
Camillus 27 


Michael 
Ward 


Paschal 
Miles 10 


Myron 
Denis 


Daniel 

Emmanuel 

Joyce 


Bernardine 
Dominic 


Fergus 11 
Brothers 


Albert 
Eugene 


Conrad 12 


Leopold 


Brothers 


Louis 24 


Meinrad 

Bruce 

Berchmans 

Rian 

Francis Martin 

Carl Anthony 


Joseph M 13 
Alan 40 
Kenneth 
Conell 18 
Quentin 10 


Donald 
Jeremias 10 
Kenny 9 
Charles G. 25 
Carl 34 


Luke 24 
Gabriel 31 
Casimir 22 
Denis 21 


Philip 21 
John 22, 31 
Thomas 
George 


Howard 17 


Brothers 


ST. LOUIS 


Novices 


Brothers 


Thaddeus 39 


Kyran 5 
Walter 7 
Celestine 44 


Gerard 


Romuald 23 


Barnabas Mary 


Anthony 21, 22 


Peter 


Columban 22 


Paul F 10 


William 24 


Alexander 


Felix 31 


Wm. Gail 14 
Leo Patrick 


LOUISVILLE 


Herbert 45 


Michael Joseph 
Nelson 


Theodore 21 


Paul 48 


Julius 5 


Kevin 
Claude 
Edgar 45 


Charles 


DETROIT 


Godfrey 


Gordian 7 


Postulants 


Clarence 5 


Keith 


Adalbert 


Ervan 45 


Ralph Doren 


Benet 7 


Students 


Charles 
Lawrence 


Anthony Mah. 
Regis 45 
Elmer 45 


DES MOINES 


Benedict 
John Ph. 


Venard 


Anselm 9 


Bernard Mary 5 


David Ferl. 


Caspar 


Andrew 


Germain 45 


Canute 7 


Alexis 


Benedict Joseph 


Maurice 


Cyprian 45 


Ignatius 


Justin 


John Mary 


Thomas 


James 45 


Louis 


Gerald 


Peter Claver 


Hubert 42, 


William Jos 45 


Malachy 


Linus 


Luke 


Marion 


Emil 45 


Martin 


Boniface 27 


Clement 


Arnold 


Roch 39 


Hilary 


Gerard 


Paul Mary 


Joyce 46 


Joel 45 


Paulinus 


Mark 


AuKustine Paul 


Alfred 




Peter 


Urban 


Joachim 


Vincent M 16 


Brothers 


Robert 32 


Timothy 


Bede 


Cormac 10 


James 43 


Matthew V 39 


Roland 


Rian 


Flannon 


Bernard 21 


Roderick 


Austin 


Jude 


Finan 


Conrad 24 


Wilfrid 


Fidelis 



424 



atrick 9 


Ed. Guido 


Gregory Mc 


FAIRFIELD 


heophane 


Jerome 


Terrence 


Edmund 9 


el 


Ernest 


Brice 




ilus 


Isidore 25 


Bro. Henry 33 


CHINA 


yril Mary 
arold 


Harold 10 
Lucian 26 


SA'MENTO 


Anthony Mai 
William W 20 


eclan 25 
•rothers 


Sacred 
Eloquence 


Angelo 8 
Gabriel 
Damian 25 


Cyrian L 20 
James L'bt 20 
Francis Fl. 20 


loysius 21 
ilbert 22 


Jordan 

Rene 

Warren 


HOUSTON 


Harrold Trav. 20 


IERRA MADRE 


Aloysius 8 


UNIVERSITY 




Co'.umban 


Stanislaus 


Gregory Jos 28 


ambert 5 


Alvin 


Bertrand 


Leon 30 


unstan 7 




John Aelrcd 


Campion 30 


eginald 


Brothers 


Conleth 


Raymund 30 


eo 9 
asil 


Richard 22 
Gerald 21 


Bro. Daniel 33 


CHAPLAINS 


ilbert 39 


Patrick 24 


ENSLEY 


Fabian 


hilip 27 




Eustace 9 


Leonard 


ius 29 


BIRMINGHAM 


Ludger 


Xavier 


If red Mc. 


Ralph 8 


Canisius 


Brian 


idan 


Cornelius 


Nathaniel 


Nicholas G. 



REFERENCES 



First Gen. Consultor SS. Giovanni e Paolo 

Rome (147), Italy 

Provincial 

I Consultor 

II Consultor 
Rector 

Master of Novices 

Vicar 

Superior 

Pastor 

Assistant 

Vice Master 

Lector of Church History 

Lector of I and II Dogma Passion 

Chaplain at Dunning 

Chaplain for Passionist Nuns 

Lector of Liturgy 

Director of Girls' Vocational Club 

Provincial Secretary 

Spiritual Director of Students 

Catholic Mission 

Passionist Fathers, Yuanling, Hunan 
China 

Cook 
. Tailor, Inflrmarian 
, Refectorian 

Outside Brothers 



25. Director of Retreatants 

26. Assistant Director of Retreatants 

27. Retreat Master 

28. Montreal 

29. Lector of S. Eloquence 

30. Notre Dame 

31. Porter 

32. Lector of History 

33. All around Brother 

34. University Students 

35. Lector of English, II Phil. 

36. Lector of Phil. I; Hist, of Phil. Ill 

37. Lector of Phil. Ill; Hist, of Phil. II, 
Apologetics 

38. S. Passion, Elocution 

39. Director 

40. Sign Fieldman 

41. Lector of Scripture III and IV Passion 
III and IV 

42. Lector of Can. Law III, IV, Pastoral 
Theol. and Catechet.ics 

43. Assistant Cook 

44. Chaplain at St. Vincent's 

45. Lector 

46. Moral III & IV. 

47. Catholic U. 

48. Vocational Director 



Obtainable piotn 

"1/te PaUiosOd 



1) Masses of the Passion (English) 

2) Mass of St. Gemma 

3) Additiones et Variationes in Officiis Propriis Congregationis 

4) Bound Passionist Bulletin No. 19 to 28 

5) "God's own Method" by Fr. Aloysius 

6) Catechism of the Principal Duties of a Passionist Religious 

7) Regulations of the Passionist Novice 

8) Order to be observed by Choir At High or Solemn Mass 

9) "A Retreat Souvenir" by Fr. Victor, C.P., translated by Fr. 
Edmund, C.P. 

10) "THE PASSIONIST", 1948, bound. 

11) St. Gemma Galgani, by Fr. Osmund, C.P. 

12) Dominic Barbari by Fr. Osmund, C.P. 

13) The Love of Mary by D. Roberto. St. Gabriel's favorite book. 

14) Pictures of Bl. Mary Goretti. 



ASS10N1ST 

JLLETINofHOLY cross province 





No. 6 



November, 1949 



THE PASSIONIST 

Bulletin of Holy Cross Province 



Vol. II, No. 6 



November, 1949 



Published bimonthly at the Sacred Heart Retreat, 1924 Newburg Road, Louisville 5, Ky., U.S.A 
Issued each January, March, May, July, September and November. Financed by free-wil 
offerings from readers. There is no Copyright. The paper is a private publication "pre 
manuscripto." 



IN THIS ISSUE 



Vox Patris 425 

Companionship with Mary 427 

Missionary Forum 470 

Recollection and Prayer 474 

Passionist Customs 478 

Sorrows of Mary 480 

Ius Particulare 486 

Obituaries 491 

General Curia 493 

Provincial Curia 493 



Province of the Pieta 49< 

Province of St. Paul 491 

Province of Holy Cross 501 

Our Parishes 50! 

St. Gabriel Province 511 

Polish Vice-Province 511 

Passionist Nuns 513 

Passionist Sisters 511 

Varia 511 

Works of the Ministry 52 



"The Passionist" aims at a deeper knowledge of the purpose of our Congregation and at i 
closer attainment of said purpose. Cooperation is invited. Consequently, contributions by an; 
member of the Congregation along the lines of news, past or present, of general or provincial 
interest ; articles dogmatic, ascetical, canonical or of historical value for us, are welcome. Als« 
photographs of recent or historic C.P. events are helpful towards the ideal "The Passionist'! 
strives to reach. Especially at present does "The Passionist" wish to establish and conduct tW 
Missionary Forum. 



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ASSIO Domini Nostri Iesu Christi 
sit semper in cordibus nostris. 

Instructions on the obligations of the 
Tertiaries of the Congregation of the 
Passion of our Lord Jesus Christ. 

THOSE who are called to serve 
' God in this poor Congregation 
of the Passion of Jesus Christ, 
clothed as Tertiaries, must conform 
as much as possible to the pro- 
fessed Lay-brothers, observing our 
Holy Rule as they do where there 
are no precise obligations. They 
must not speak in the Retreat 
without necessity, remaining in si- 
lence like the others when their 
work does not demand talk. Above 
all they must be humb'e, docile, 
respectful and — what is more im- 
portant — obedient and submissive, 
particularly towards the superiors, 
doing promptly what they are com- 
manded. When sent outside the 
Retreat and while traveling they 




must diligently observe modesty, 
particularly with women, and while 
eating, etc. They should endeavor 
to show that they also live with 
the sons of the Passion of Jesus 
Christ and they should study to 
follow their example. Then they 
will give no cause for scandal to 
others, but will be very pleasing 
to God and thus will become saints 
in their own state. 

The habit of the Tertiaries 
should be like that of the professed 
Lay-brothers but three finger- 
widths shorter, with a mantle with- 
out collar (bavaro)? They are not 
to wear the holy Sign except when 
they go out, and it is to be a 
smaller one, since this is a dis- 
tinctive mark of the professed a- 
lone. They are not to wear a shirt 
nor anything else of linen but a 
poor woolen sweatshirt like the 
rest, except during the time of 

425 



the quests. Let them wear two 
straps on their sandals with the 
upper part open so their bare feet 
may appear. 

Their work does not permit fast- 
ing so when they are working they 
can take a collation in the morning 
and a good meal in the evening to 
satisfy their need. 

Because they wear the habit of 
our Congregation, they can eat in 
the refectory with the other re- 
ligious, but in the last place after 
the Lay-brothers. They are not to 
be admitted to the common recrea- 
tion. At their death they are to 
receive the same suffrages as the 
Lay-brothers. 

Since the end of our Congrega- 
tion is to spread the forgotten de- 
votion of the Passion of our Re- 
deemer, and since it is very rea- 
sonable that everyone who wears 
the holy habit should try to have 
the tenderest devotion towards It; 
as the Tertiaries do not have work 



that would exclude them from a 
fast of the Church, they are toi 
fast every Friday, dedicated as it 
is to the memory of Christ's Pas- 
sion. This we beg them to do with 
all exactness. 

Furthermore they will come to 
Mass and make a half-hour of men- 
tal prayer every morning, and a- 
gain in the evening at Compline 
or before, at whatever time suits 
them better. 

They are to recite the vocal 
prayers which the other Professed 
Lay-brothers recite in memory of 
the Passion of Our Crucified Love. 
They are to receive Holy Com- 
munion every eight days or oftener 
as the Fr. Superior shall judge. 

Finally they are to fly all con- 
tention with the other Brothers, 
which can occasionally occur, and 
so not harm holy Charity, but they 
are to yield to all, exercising them- 
selves in virtue in order to enjoy 
its reward in Paradise. 



General 



The present Letter gives some regulations for the Tertiaries who were received in the 
early days of the Congregation. The present decrees were approved by the Fourth General 
Chapter, 1764. The Tertiary took only one vow, that of perseverance. His duty was to help 
the lay-brothers in their work, especially in making the quest. The Tertiaries or Oblates 
remained until the Sixth General Chapter in 1775 had inserted later among its decrees one 
prohibiting their admission in the future (Cf. Lettere Vol. IV, p. 290). Those who had the 
habit were either to make Profession after a year of probation or remain in their present state 
with the right of Suffrages when they died. In the "Ius Particulare CP." Pt. I, T.I, Cha. II, art. 
3, n. 14 (Cf. Pd88ioni8t Bulletin May 5, 1947, p. 9) M. Rev. Fr. Titus, C.P. gives a summary 
of their place and work in the Congregation. The present Circular Letter bears no date but 
was inserted here when it was first published in the "Bollettino" Gennaio 1924 p. 18. with thei 
explanation "so as not to confuse the sequence of the others". 



42f, 



Companionship witfi <J\la>i\j 
cJn Comforting Cmist 




"You see, son, how I am clothed 
in a garment of mourning? This is 
because of the sorrowful death of my 
beloved Son Jesus. You must be clothed 
with the same garment, and you must 
start a Congregation which will con- 
tinually sorrow over the Passion and 
Death of my beloved Son." 1 



427 




N a flash every uncertainty 
vanished. His eyes were 
clear and sure as he lifted 
a shining face to gaze into 
the future. Paul was young 
— just 26. For long months 
after honorable discharge from the 
army, his young mind had been 
struggling with doubts and inde- 
cision about what to do with his 
life. Should he enter the Order of 
St. Augustine? — or become a Ser- 
vite? — or a Capuchin? And now 
at last, towards the end of that 
summer of 1720, he had the an- 
swer — thanks to Mary. She came 
to him clothed in a black garment, 
wearing the Sign of the Passion 
over her Immaculate Heart, and 
she told him : 

"Found a Congregation which 
will sorrow continually with me 
over the Passion and death of 
my Beloved Son." 

In answer to his sorrowing 
Mother, St. Paul of the Cross gave 
her the Passionists. We are his 
response to her plea for fellowship 
in compassion, for companionship 
beneath the Cross. Compassion for 
Christ and the zeal that it inspires 
to preach His Passion to men — 
this is the Passionist spirit, as 
Passionists have always known it 
and as they have handed it down. 
Perhaps from the time of our 
very first week in the novitiate we 
learned of the Holy Founder's visit 
from the Mother of Sorrows, dele- 
gating him to found the Congrega- 

428 



tion. Passionist masters of nov* 
ices down through the two cen-i 
turies of our existence have been 
at great pains to explain the mean-| 
ing of this apparition, to instil 
into the hearts of their charges 
the deep significance of Mary's 
words. 

Yet, what is meant by compas-, 
sion? It certainly is not emotion 
and sensible feeling, though it maj 
begin at times in this way. I 
should expect and even desire i| 
total lack of feeling. Only thui 
can it become perfect com-passior 
for a Master utterly devoid of an}, 
consolation whatever. Mary, th( 
sorrowful Mother beneath the cross 
is our perfect exemplar in thisi 
We don't imagine her compassion 
to be filled with sweet emotion 
and sentimentality. 

Compassion for Christ is an ac 
of the will — a determination U 
give love and loyal service to Jesus 
Crucified. For a Passionist it is i 
will to live dedicated to the cross 
of Christ. He manifests this will 
when he pronounces his fourth 
vow, when he follows an auster* 
rule, and when he goes out to dravl 
others close to Jesus on the cross 
To give enthusiasm, spirit anr 
unity to his life and life's work 
a deep, intimate, all-consuminj 
personal love for Jesus Crucifiet 
is necessary. One form that thi 
personal love can take is a con 
scious and continual desire to com 
passionate Jesus in His sorrows 



3 



That we may love and glory in 
>ur vocation, that our hearts may 
>pen wide with gratitude to God, 
ve must ever strive to know more 
ibout it. In the following pages 
ve will study this aspect of our 
vocation: companionship with Mary 
n comforting Christ. We will see 
low solid it is theologically and 
low prominent in the writings of 
St. Paul of the Cross. This study 
s divided according to the follow- 
ng outline : 

Part I : Theological Foundation 
in Sacred Scripture 

Part II : Theological Foundation 



in Papal Pronouncements 
Part III : Passionist Tradition 
Part IV: The Grace of Sharing 

in the Passion 
Part V : Ways of Comforting 

Christ 
Part VI : The Passionist Voca- 
tion in Acti